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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Chapter Eleven Teaching Students with Communication Disorders This multimedia product and its contents are protected under copyright law. The following are prohibited by law: any public performance or display, including transmission of any image over a network; preparation of any derivative work, including the extraction, in whole or in part, of any images; any rental, lease, or lending of the program.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Introduction Most of us take our ability to communicate for granted. When communication is impaired, absent, or qualitatively different, the simplest interactions become different or even impossible. Disorders in communication may result in social problems in school. Communication problems are often complex. There are many different types of communication disorders, involving both speech and language.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Definitions of Communication & Language COMMUNICATION is the exchange of information and ideas. Communication involves encoding, transmitting, and decoding messages. It is an interactive process requiring at least two parties to play the roles of both sender and receiver. LANGUAGE is a system used by a group of people for giving meaning to sounds, words, gestures, and other symbols to enable communication with one another.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Definition of Speech (Heward, 1995) Although it is not the only possible vehicle for expressing language (gestures, manual signing, patterns, and written symbols can also be used to convey ideas and intentions), speech is a most effective and efficient endeavor. Speech is one of the most complex and difficult human endeavors. SPEECH is the actual behavior of producing a language code by making appropriate vocal sound patterns.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Important Language Considerations (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 1982) Effective use of language for communication requires a broad understanding of human interactions, including associated factors such as nonverbal cues, motivation, and sociocultural roles. Language learning and use are determined by the interaction of biological, cognitive, psychosocial, and environmental factors. Language is rule-governed behavior. Language evolves within specific historical, social, and cultural contexts.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Normal and Disordered Communication According to Emerick and Haynes (1986), a communication difference is considered a disability when: the transmission or perception of messages is faulty. the person is placed at an economic disadvantage. the person is placed at a learning disadvantage. the person is placed at a social disadvantage. there is a negative impact upon the persons emotional growth. the problem causes physical damage or endangers the health of the person.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Types of Communication Disorders SPEECH DISORDERS LANGUAGE DISORDERS
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Speech Disorders SPEECH DISORDERS include impairments of: Voice Articulation Fluency
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Prevalence About 2% of the school-age population were classified as having speech or language impairments during the 1999- 2000 school year. Because many other students have other conditions as their primary disability but still receive speech-language services, the total number of students served by speech- language pathologists is about 5% of all school-age children (2/3s of these students are boys) Students with communication disorders constitute about 20% of all students with disabilities. Of the estimated one million students identified as speech- language impaired, over 90% are 6 to 12 years old.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Identification, Assessment, and Eligibility Students with speech or language impairments are the most highly integrated of all students with disabilities. During the 1998-1999 school year, 88.5% of students with communication disorders were served in general education classrooms, and 6.5% were served in resource rooms. The small proportion served in separate classes most likely represents students with severe language delays and disabilities.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Types of Speech Disorders Articulatory & Phonological Disorders Voice Disorders Fluency Disorders
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Articulatory and Phonological Disorders Articulation and phonological disorders are the most common speech disorder affecting about 10% of preschool and school age children. The ability to articulate clearly and use the phonological code correctly is a function of many variables, including: Age Developmental History Oral-Motor Skills Culture
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Most Common Types of Articulation Efforts Distortions Substitutions Omissions Additions
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Organic & Functional Causes of Articulatory & Phonological Disorders FUNCTIONAL CAUSES: lack of opportunities to practice appropriate/ inappropriate speech transient hearing loss during early development absence of good speech models differences in speech related to culture (often do not constitute a speech disorder) ORGANIC CAUSES: Cleft palate Dental malformations Tumors Hearing loss Brain damage Other related neurological problems The severity of articulation disorders can vary widely, depending in part on the causes of the disorder.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Teaching Suggestions Take note of how understandable or intelligible the students speech is. Consider how many different errors the student makes. Consider whether the errors could be due to physical problems. Evaluate whether the speech errors may have an impact of the students ability to read and write. Observe whether the articulation errors cause the student problems in socialization or adjustment.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Voice Disorders Defined VOICE DISORDERS are abnormalities of speech related to volume, quality, or pitch. Voice disorders are not very common in children. It is difficult to distinguish an unpleasant voice from one that would be considered disordered. Two basic types of voice disorders: Phonation - production of sounds by the vocal folds EXAMPLE: Hoarseness Resonance - hypernasality or hyponasality
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Causes of Voice Disorders Vocal Abuse and Misuse Trauma to the Larynx, Nodules, or Tumors Learned Speech Patterns Medical Conditions or Trauma Reyes syndrome Juvenile arthritis Psychiatric problems Tourette syndrome When voice disorders are related to a medical condition, the child may be referred to an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat doctor). Most voice disorders are due to functional problems, resulting from learned speech patterns.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Questions to Ask Before Referring a Student for a Possible Voice Disorder Might the voice quality be related to a hearing loss? Is there a possibility that the voice disorder is related to another medical condition? Has there been a recent, noticeable change in the students vocal quality? Does the student habitually abuse or misuse his voice? Does the students voice problem make him difficult for others to understand? Is the students voice having such an unpleasant effect on others that the student is teased or excluded from activities?
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Fluency Disorders Defined FLUENCY refers to the pattern of the rate and flow of a persons speech. Normal speech patterns include some interruptions in speech flow. When the interruptions in speech flow are so frequent or pervasive that a speaker cannot be understood, when efforts at speech are so intense that they are uncomfortable, or when they draw undue attention, then the dysfluencies are considered a problem. Many young children exhibit dysfluencies; these typically disappear by age 5.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Fluency Disorders Fluency problems consist of blocking, repeating, or prolonging sounds, syllables, words, or phrases. The most frequent type of fluency disorder is stuttering, which affects about 2% of the school-age children. More boys than girls are affected.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Stuttering In stuttering, interruptions in speech are frequently obvious to both the speaker and the listener. Stuttering has received much attention, even though it is not as prevalent as other communication disorders.
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  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Ba

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