(c) allyn & bacon 2004copyright © allyn and bacon 2004 chapter three home-school collaboration:...

Download (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright © Allyn and Bacon 2004 Chapter Three Home-School Collaboration: Working with Families This multimedia product and its

Post on 19-Dec-2015

213 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Slide 1
  • Slide 2
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Chapter Three Home-School Collaboration: Working with Families This multimedia product and its contents are protected under copyright law. The following are prohibited by law: any public performance or display, including transmission of any image over a network; preparation of any derivative work, including the extraction, in whole or in part, of any images; any rental, lease, or lending of the program.
  • Slide 3
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Introduction Prior to PL 94-142, many schools did not encourage parents of children with special needs to participate in the education of their children. Federal law established the role of parents of students with special needs through the passage of PL 94-142.
  • Slide 4
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 IDEA Requirements for Parental Involvement Involve parents in decision-making activities. Inform parents of impending actions. Provide parents with information in a form they can readily understand. Make available due process rights to parents. Enable parents to request a due-process hearing if there is a disagreement that cannot be resolved with school personnel.
  • Slide 5
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Definition of Family Support Family support is an intervention model that provides services for the entire family of a child who has a disability.
  • Slide 6
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Six Categories of Family Support Principles Enhancing a Sense of Community Mobilizing Resources and Supports Protecting Family Integrity Strengthening Family Functioning Shared Responsibility and Collaboration Proactive Human Service Practices
  • Slide 7
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Areas in Which Family Participation Should Occur Student Assessment IEP Involvement with Parent Groups Observation in the School Setting Communication with Educators
  • Slide 8
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 What is a Family? Traditional View: - A family is a group of individuals who live together including a mother, a father, and one or more children Contemporary View: This view recognizes that numerous family arrangements exist.
  • Slide 9
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Cultural Considerations Teachers must be sensitive to the background of their students to ensure that cultural differences do not interfere with school-family relationships. School personnel should also put aside preconceived notions about various lifestyles. A family systems perspective is needed to enhance a childs educational program.
  • Slide 10
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Families and Children with Disabilities The arrival of a child results in changes in family structure and dynamics; the arrival of a child with a disabilities exacerbates these challenges. In addition to financial and emotional issues, other critical problems facing families include: Expensive medical treatment Expensive equipment Recurring crisis situations Stress on marriages Limited respite care services
  • Slide 11
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Various Reactions Families May Have When Learning Their Child Has a Disability Denial Anger Grief Fear Guilt Confusion Powerlessness Disappointment Acceptance Although these reactions are common ones, school personnel should keep in mind that parents are very different in the ways they respond when learning that their child has a disability.
  • Slide 12
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Stage Theory Approach to Parental Reactions Parental responses to learning that their child has a disability rarely follow any formal stage process.
  • Slide 13
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 How School Staff Can Help Parents Be aware of the reactions parents may have when they learn their child has a disability. Help parents understand the nature and needs of their childs disability.
  • Slide 14
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 What Parents Want and Need from School Professionals To communicate without jargon or to have terms explained To have conferences scheduled to enable both parents to attend To receive written materials that provide information that will assist them in understanding their childs problems
  • Slide 15
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 What Parents Want and Need from School Professionals To receive a copy of a written report about their child To receive specific advice on how to manage the specific behavior problems of their child or how to teach them needed skills To receive information regarding their childs social as well as academic behavior
  • Slide 16
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Parents Views on Inclusion Some parents (e.g., Learning Disabilities Association) have remained cautious about inclusion. Other parents (e.g., the Arc) have actively favored inclusion. Teachers should be sensitive to the fact that parents may have quite different views regarding inclusive practices.
  • Slide 17
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Involvement of Fathers The involvement of the entire family should be the primary goal. Often, the father is left out of the planning process. Children often do better in school if fathers are involved.
  • Slide 18
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Involvement of Siblings Siblings are important in developing and implementing educational programs. Some siblings may experience adjustment problems related to their siblings disability.
  • Slide 19
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Needs of Siblings Need for information about their siblings disability Need to address feelings of isolation Need to address feelings of guilt Need to address feelings of resentment Need to address perceived pressure to achieve Need to address caregiving demands Need to address their role in their siblings future
  • Slide 20
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Needs of Siblings Sibling Support Groups can be helpful. Additional Suggestions: Inform siblings about the nature and cause of the disability. Involve siblings in conferences with school personnel. Openly discuss the disability with all family members.
  • Slide 21
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Parent Education Parent education classes may be very helpful. Seeing that other parents face similar challenges can be comforting and empowering.
  • Slide 22
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Home-School Collaboration School personnel should: Be actively involved with families/parents. Recognize that parents vary tremendously in knowledge and expertise Consider parental advice; parents know their children very well
  • Slide 23
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Communicating with Parents Many teachers are not prepared to work with parents. Poor communication may cause many problems that could be avoided.
  • Slide 24
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Principles of Effective Communication Accept Listen Question Encourage Stay directed Develop an alliance Avoid defensiveness Effective communication must be regular and useful.
  • Slide 25
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Types of School-Home Communication Informal Exchanges Parent Observations Telephone Calls Written Notes Home Visits Formal Meetings
  • Slide 26
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Types of Formal Meetings IEP Meetings IFSP Meetings Individual Transition Plan Meetings Behavior Intervention Plan Meetings
  • Slide 27
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 IEP Meetings Reasons why parents need to be involved in IEP meetings: IDEA requires it. Most importantly, the input of parents is critical.
  • Slide 28
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 IEP Meetings: Helpful Hints Hold conferences in a small location free from distraction. Start conferences on time and maintain the schedule. Arrange the schedule so that participants are comfortable. Present information clearly, concisely, and in a way parents can understand.
  • Slide 29
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 IFSP Meetings Agencies serving young children with disabilities must develop an Individual Family Service Plan as required by PL 994-457. This requirement is based on the assumption that families cannot be effective in a childs intervention program if their own needs are not being met. The IFSP takes family needs (e.g., respite care, transportation) into consideration and provides strategies that can address some of the family needs while providing services to their child.
  • Slide 30
  • (c) Allyn & Bacon 2004Copyright Allyn and Bacon 2004 Me

Recommended

View more >