Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 1 States of Matter.

Download Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 1 States of Matter.

Post on 21-Dec-2015

213 views

Category:

Documents

1 download

TRANSCRIPT

<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 1 States of Matter </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 2 Some definitions Matter: has mass and volume Chemistry is the study of matter The properties of different types of matter The way matter changes and behaves when influenced by other matter and/or energy </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 3 Properties of Matter Physical Properties: the inherent characteristics of matter that are directly observable. Color Melting point Boiling point Chemical Properties: the characteristics of matter that allow it to form new substances Alcohol ignites in a flame. Wood is burned in a fireplace. </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 4 Classify each of the following as a physical or chemical property: Ethyl alcohol boiling at 78C. Hardness of a diamond. Sugar fermenting to form ethyl alcohol. </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 5 Changes in Matter Physical changes: changes to matter that do not result in a change the inherent make-up of the substance State changes: boiling, melting, condensing Chemical changes: changes that involve a change in the fundamental components of the substance Chemical reactions: Reactants Products e.g. propane + oxygen carbon dioxide + water </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 6 Classify each of the following as a physical or chemical change: Iron metal melting Iron combining with oxygen to form rust Sugar fermenting to form ethyl alcohol </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 7 Elements and Compounds Elements: substances that cannot be broken down into simpler substances by chemical reactions Most substances are chemical combinations of elements. These combinations are called compounds. Compounds are made of elements. Compounds can be broken down into elements. </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 8 Classification of Matter Homogeneous: uniform composition throughout Pure substances Solutions (homogeneous mixtures) Heterogeneous: non-uniform; contains regions with different properties than other regions </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 9 Pure Substances Pure substances All samples have the same physical and chemical properties. Constant composition: All samples have the same composition. Homogeneous </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 10 Mixtures Different samples may show different properties. Variable composition. Homogeneous or heterogeneous. Separate into components based on physical properties All mixtures are made of pure substances. </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 11 Solutions A solution is a homogeneous mixture. Phase can be gaseous, liquid, or solid. </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 12 Identity each of the following as a pure substance, homogeneous mixture, or heterogeneous mixture. Gasoline A stream with gravel on the bottom Copper metal </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 13 Gas Chromatogram of Unleaded Gasoline </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 14 Separation of a Mixture </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> Copyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 15 The organization of matter (Figure 3.10) </li> </ul>

Recommended

View more >