red deer advocate, june 20, 2016

Click here to load reader

Download Red Deer Advocate, June 20, 2016

Post on 03-Aug-2016

236 views

Category:

Documents

11 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

June 20, 2016 edition of the Red Deer Advocate

TRANSCRIPT

  • Alberta Health Services wants to help put an end to the food fight at the table when young children refuse to eat whats on their plate.

    The free workshop Goodbye Meal-time Struggles, for parents with chil-dren from six months to five years old, will run on Thursday, from 9:15 to 11:15 a.m., at Family Services of Central Al-berta, 5409 Gaetz Ave.

    Led by a registered dietitian and a pediatric occupational therapist, the focus is on developing the eating skills of children, how to introduce new foods, and more.

    Shelley Cooper, registered dietitian with nutrition services, population and public health, at Alberta Health Ser-vices, Central Zone, said parents have to be ready for children to reject some of the food they are offered.

    It sometimes takes numerous expo-sures, like 15 exposures to a food, be-fore they are comfortable eating that food and will actually say they like the food, Cooper said.

    She said its definitely stressful when children wont eat and thats why

    parents may unfortunately resort to bribing or forcing which triggers the flight or flight stress response in chil-dren. Blood flow is redirected away from the stomach so their interest in

    food disappears.Unlike children, adults can com-

    municate what they like and what they dont like, while children may resort to throwing food, fussing or crying, she

    said.With kids all foods are new. We

    kind of forget and its hard to be pa-tient all the time.

    But children arent alone when it comes to being cautious about food. Even as experience eaters, adults may approach an unfamiliar meal or recipe or food carefully, she said.

    We may take a little bit. Or we may ask a friend if theyve tried it. We may smell the food.

    Cooper said the workshop is about letting parents know they are not alone in their struggles and that there are ways to work with their children for better mealtimes. Its also helpful for parents who arent experiencing problems and want to learn how to set up good eating habits for their chil-dren.

    Mealtime tips include always of-fering some familiar foods alongside unfamiliar foods, establishing three meals and two snacks per day to avoid grazing and to ensure an appetite at meals, and getting children involved in grocery shopping or cooking. Hiding foods in recipes should be avoided.

    Sarah and Chauncey Carters cano-la-powered school bus that they con-verted into a home on wheels has eco-friendly and economical written all over it.

    Actually, what it does say is The Wandering Bus in big blue letters above the front windshield. But it runs primarily on canola oil donated by mom and pop restaurants and shops they find on their travels.

    Chauncey said canola oil doesnt add to the greenhouse effect and their bus gets 27 miles to the gallon com-pared to 18 miles on diesel.

    Theres a lot of places the oil is not recycled. Its just thrown out. Thats when we put it to a better use, said Chauncey, 28, while visiting friends in Lacombe on Friday.

    (Shop owners) are eager to get rid of it so were doing them a favor and theyre doing us a favour at the same time, said Sarah, 23.

    The couple, based in Whistler, B.C., passed through Central Alber-ta late last week during their latest cross-country adventure.

    Three years ago they joined the skoolie movement by converting a school bus into a recreational vehicle.

    Sarah said there are about 2,000 skoolies.

    The couple gutted their bus three years ago and put in a kitchen, bath-room, shower, work space with a desk, a bedroom with a queen-sized bed, and a deck on the roof. They also added so-lar panels for energy.

    Sarah said theyve spent about $40,000 to convert the bus and have travelled the continent.

    Its nice to build your own home and then be able to move it. Its a cheap form of living.

    Their 2001 school bus was decom-missioned just because of a faulty light, she said.

    There are graveyards of buses.

    And buses are almost indestructi-ble because they are made of steel, Chauncey said.

    They carry the nations most pre-

    cious cargo. School buses are the most over-engineered vehicles for civil-ians.

    For more information visit The

    Wandering Bus on Facebook or Insta-

    gram.

    szielinski@reddeeradvocate.com

    RED DEER ADVOCATE Friday, May 13, 2016 A01

    B9

    B5A HEALTHIER SHORTCAKE THAT WONT SHORT-SELL YOUR STRAWBERRIES

    CAVALIERS COMPLETE COMEBACK FOR NBA TITLE

    STAR TREK ACTOR KILLED BY OWN VEHICLE

    PLEASE RECYCLE

    M O N D A Y J U N E 2 0 2 0 1 6

    www . r e d d e e r a d v o c a t e . c om$1 . 0 0

    B1

    INDEX RED DEER WEATHER

    NEWS A1-8

    COMMENT A4

    SPORTS B1-4

    Business A9-10

    Food B5

    Entertainment B9

    Advice B10

    COMICS B8

    LOTTERIES

    SATURDAY

    Lotto 649: 7, 8, 22, 32, 40, 45,

    Bonus: 25

    Extra: 1117350

    Numbers are unofficial.

    Local Today Tonight Tuesday Wednesday

    Sunny Clear Thunderstorm risk Mainly Sunny

    A9JOBS AT RISK IN FADING LUMBER DEAL

    Running on eco-friendly

    Photo by JEFF STOKOE/Advocate staff

    Sarah and Chauncey Carter along with their dog Money are travelling across Canada in their renovated school bus. The solar-powered vehicle runs on canola oil or diesel and will soon gather rain water.

    BY SUSAN ZIELINSKIADVOCATE STAFF

    Putting an end to the food fight with children

    Photo by JEFF STOKOE/Advocate staff

    Alberta Health Services registered dietitian Shelley Cooper, right, discusses appropriate meal sizes for children and adults with Jackie Tomalty, a parent participant in the Good Bye Mealtime Struggles program.

    BY SUSAN ZIELINSKIADVOCATE STAFF

    See FOOD on Page A2

    24 9 20 23

  • 20% OFF MSRP%For A Limited Time

    www.pikewheaton.com

    3110 GAETZ AVE., RED DEERLOCAL 403-347-3301

    TOLL FREE 1-800-661-0995

    was $63,105

    20% Off : $50,484

    2016 CHEVROLET SILVERADO CREW CAB1500 4WD LTZ Stk# 31751

    SAVINGS$12,621

    SAVINGS$8,819was $44,095SAVI$8 8$44 095

    20% Off : $35,276

    2016 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE LT AWDStk# 31803 * Price includes $400 Admin Fee, $20 Tire Tax,

    $6.25 AMVIC Levy, excludes GST

    7654

    484F

    20

    Monday, June 20, 2016NEWS A2

    Rocky Mountain House Sylvan LakeOlds, Innisfail Ponoka

    Stettler Lacombe MiamiKamloops

    Sunny23 10

    Sunny23 11

    Sunny23 11

    Sun and Cloud23 12

    Sunny23 10

    Sunny24 12

    Chance of Rain30 25

    Sun and Clouds25 13

    Local Today

    Sun and Cloud Clear Thunderstorm risk Mainly Sunny Thurs

    23

    Sunrise

    5:14

    Sunset

    9:58

    Fri

    19

    Sat

    20

    Tonight Tuesday WednesdayTHE WEATHER

    9 20 2324

    The regions weatherfor tonight

    Fort McMurray 23/11

    Grande Prairie24/12

    Jasper21/9

    Banff20/7

    Calgary24/9

    Lethbridge24/13

    Edmonton24/13

    Brought to you by Pike Wheaton

    We dont want to set up any mistrust. We want to set up that positive feeding relationship. Focus more on talking about the foods and experiencing the foods together.

    Providing healthy foods is also important, she said.

    Their tummies are a lot smaller and we want to make sure that the food that is offered to them is nutrient dense so that their tummies are filled up on nutrient-dense foods.

    She said establishing a relaxed, pleasant atmo-sphere at meals that is focused on the family will go a long way to reducing conflicts.

    As a parent its important for us to learn our role is to offer food, healthy foods in regular intervals, and its up to the child to decide whether theyre going to eat that food and how much they are going to eat.

    To register for Goodbye Mealtime Struggles call 403-309-8222 or online at www.fsca.ca. Free child care is provided.

    Another workshop will also run Aug. 25.szielinski@reddeeradvocate.com

    STORY FROM A1

    FOOD: Mistrust

    Notley target meant for a laughBY THE CANADIAN PRESS

    BROOKS, Alta. An organizer of an Alberta golf tournament where a cutout of Premier Rachel Not-ley was placed on the course as a target says it was meant to be humorous and was never intended to promote violence.

    Ernest Bothi, president of the Big Country Oil-mens Association, says it was his idea to use the cut-out, which was placed on the 11th hole of the Brooks Golf Club during the associations annual golf tour-nament on Friday.

    The cutout drew criticism Saturday from an Al-berta NDP member of the legislature, who says it was inappropriate to put a womans face on a target, especially following the murder of British MP Jo Cox.

    Bothi says people in the local energy industry are frustrated with Notleys carbon tax and the cutout was meant as a laugh.

    He also says he was unaware of Coxs gender, and thought the MP was a man when news reports Friday said the victims name was Jo.

    Bothi says he doubts there would have been an uproar if former prime minister Stephen Harpers face was on a target.

    Theres a lot of people here down in Brooks that, for want of a better term, needed a bit of a lift, Bothi said in an interview on Saturday.

    He said no one hit the target.Everybody had a good laugh and thats all it was.

    It was good-hearted laughter. Nobodys going to hop into their vehicles and head off to Edmonton and do something horrible, he added.

    There was even women on the course who got a good chuckle out of it.

    Marie Renaud, a New Democrat who represents St. Albert in the legislature, called the Notley target upsetting. Renaud returned a call from the pre-miers office seeking comment on it.

    Of course, you hear the normal excuse, Its a

    joke. Thats not a jok