red deer advocate, january 26, 2016

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January 26, 2016 edition of the Red Deer Advocate

TRANSCRIPT

  • A winter phenomenon that is at-tracting sightseers and photographers to Abraham Lake comes with a caution from an experienced outdoorsman.

    The artificial lake, which is a reser-voir for the Bighorn Dam on the North Saskatchewan River, is located 211 km west of Red Deer on Hwy 11. It has been a popular destination in winter because of large frozen bubbles in the ice.

    The bubbles are caused by meth-ane gas released by decaying organic matter in the water. The gas freezes in the ice during winter, making for some interesting photos.

    However, because water is drawn down from the reservoir, it can create conditions where there is air, not wa-ter, right below the ice surface.

    Bary Shellian, from Rocky Mountain House, recently went out to the lake, in the vicinity known as Windy Point, about 40 km west of Nordegg. He had gone out to the area to ride his fat-tire bike, made for riding in winter condi-tions, because he had heard about the bubbles.

    Its not a lake, its a reservoir, which means its constantly being drained, said Shellian.

    Its not safe at all actually because if it was a normal lake and you fell through the ice, the water would be right there. You might have a hope of getting back up.

    But boy, the reservoir, if the ice broke, you could drop several feet through space before you hit the wa-

    ter. The ice doesnt drop as the water is depleted.

    His advice is to stay off the lake.I have a pretty high tolerance for

    risk. Ive been through the ice before and pulled myself up. But if someone were to fall through the ice, they may not be able to reach up high enough from the water to pull themselves out.

    Red Deer Regional Hospital Centre is getting new life-saving equipment to diagnose cardiac conditions thanks to a $750,000 anonymous donation to Red Deer Regional Health Foundation.

    The hospital is getting its first trans-esophageal echocardiography system, known as TEE.

    The state-of-the-art equipment, worth $500,000, allows doctors to pic-ture the hearts movement, check for blood health, see clots, and any harm-ful bodies or diseases in the circulato-ry system.

    Essentially its an ultrasound that goes down to your esophagus and gives a better look at your heart than the conventional ultrasound, said Iaian Park, foundation executive director on Monday.

    The TEE will shorten diagnosis time, show the presence of arterial clots and further infections, assess valves for ruptures or leaks, and help prevent cryptogenic strokes, which are sudden and of unknown origin.

    It will aid echo and stress testing for patients with cardiac conditions that require more detailed analysis and tailored treatment.

    RESIDENTIAL PLOWING IS UNDERWAY

    reddeer.ca/snowzone 403.406.8796

    "%& )"0-/("!,+1%"01/""14%"+ +,4,+" &0 "&+$ -),4"!4&))"

    1. Know your Snow Zone and Route2. Check the schedule3. Move your vehicle

    NOBILL 6

    CARBONTAX

    BILL 6

    ONTAX

    LET YOUR VOICE BE HEARD

    THURSDAY, JANUARY 28TH QUALITY INN-NORTH HILL INN

    11:30 AM - 8:00 PM

    Sign the petitions calling for plebiscites on Bill 6 and the Carbon Tax.

    Red Deer AdvocateTUESDAY, JAN. 26, 2016

    Your trusted local news authority www.reddeeradvocate.com

    Two sectionsAlberta . . . . . . . . . . . . A3Business . . . . . . A9-A10Canada . . . . . . . . A5, A7Classified . . . . . . B6-B7Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . A8Entertainment . . . . . . B9Sports . . . . . . . . . B1-B5

    INDEX

    PLEASE RECYCLE

    Father of shooting victim prepares his sons grave

    The father of one of the victims of a mass shooting burned logs at the community cemetery where his son will be buried.

    Story on PAGE A5FORECAST ON A2

    WEATHER Increasing cloudiness. High 2. Low -6.

    B9The rise of an unlikely TV juggernautHomes away from home

    LOOK MA, NO HANDS!

    Photo by JEFF STOKOE/Advocate staff

    Kylie Stockford and Donovin Langille got the chance to enjoy a little winter playtime at school Monday afternoon. The Grade 2 students in Nicole Gruntmans class at Joseph Welsh Elementary, along with their classmates, donned their skates and took advantage of the rink on the school yard.

    Photo by JEFF STOKOE/Advocate staff

    Red Deer Regional Hospital Foundation executive director Iaian Park, left, speaks with cardiologist Dr. Stephen Tilley in the cardiology department at Red Deer Regional Hospital on Monday. Tilley and Park are excited about new cardiac testing equipment that will be brought online in Red Deer.

    Anonymous donation to hospital fits to a TEE

    BY SUSAN ZIELINSKIADVOCATE STAFF

    Please see DONATION on Page A2

    School board to vote on

    boundary changes

    It would be hard to argue the Red Deer Public School District didnt do their homework.

    For more than a year, they have consulted, developed scenarios, con-sulted, engaged online and consulted some more in the redistricting of a number of schools starting in Septem-ber 2017.

    T h a t s t h e y e a r the new In-g l e w o o d S c h o o l opens and the need for new bound-aries there opened up the door for the district to make a larger effort to get its school areas right, said s u p e r i n -tendent Stu Henry.

    W e wanted to look at the whole pic-ture, said Henry. You dont get many chances to get it right and there was a sense that some of the neighbourhoods werent going to the closest schools and we had a chance to fix things.

    For example Vanier Woods and Vanier Woods East students were pre-viously attending Barrie Wilson, which is located in Timberlands. Their po-tential new school in Inglewood will be much closer to home.

    The public school board will vote on Wednesday on the redistricting pro-posed by the boards administration.

    Henry said the best feedback came from online with the meetings and open houses being poorly attended. The online process had 1,000 partici-pants with 3,000 comments. That feed-back led to the proposed solution.

    One of the larger adjustments is the relocation of the Spanish Bilingual program.

    BY MURRAY CRAWFORDADVOCATE STAFF

    WE WANTED TO LOOK AT THE WHOLE

    PICTURE. YOU DONT GET MANY

    CHANCES TO GET IT RIGHT AND THERE

    WAS A SENSE THAT SOME OF THE NEIGHBOURHOODS

    WERENT GOING TO THE CLOSEST

    SCHOOLS AND WE HAD A CHANCE TO

    FIX THINGS. STU HENRY, SUPERINTENDENT

    Please see SCHOOLS on Page A2

    Abraham Lakes frozen bubbles beautiful but deadly

    MARY-ANN BARRADVOCATE STAFF

    Contributed photo by BARRY SHELLIAN

    The ice at Abraham Lake showing frozen bubbles of methane, caused by plants releasing the gas, which then gets frozen and trapped under the ice.

    Please see BUBBLES on Page A2

  • Suspect in West Country crime spree to stand trial in May

    An accused in a summer crime spree will head to trial in late May for a litany of charges.

    Zane Curtis Bronson, 28, of no fixed address was arrested by the RCMP near Breton, but the alleged offences occurred in Rocky Mountain House and Rimbey in August, 2015.

    He is charged with two counts each of break and enter, possession of break-in instruments, having his face masked and mischief under $5,000 and one count each of theft of a motor vehicle, mischief over $5,000, arson to a vehicle, possession of a firearm while committing an indictable offence and possession of a firearm dangerous to the public peace.

    The trial will be held form May 30 to June 2 in Rimbey provincial court.

    Police said the spree started early on Aug. 6 in Rimbey when two men attempted to break into an ATM outside of the Servus Credit Union at 4:20 a.m. Rimbey RCMP were alerted of a break and enter to an Esso Gas station about 20 minutes after the Servus incident.

    Outside of Rimbey, police were told of a pickup truck on fire at 5 a.m. That truck was reported stolen earlier that evening and was believed to have been involved in the downtown Rimbey incidents.

    At 11:30 a.m. Rocky Mountain House RCMP attempted to pull a vehicle over. The vehicle pulled over, but went into reverse and rammed the police car before leaving the scene.

    The suspects were arrested near Breton after a chase that started 35 km north of Rocky Mountain House.

    Penhold resident wins $1 millionWhat are the chances that there would be two

    separate back-to-back big lottery wins in the same small community?

    Well, whatever they are, the odds were in Axel Griesshabers favour when he won $1 million in a Maxmillions draw.

    The Penhold resident followed a different big win by two other Penhold residents; Jeannot Desjardins and his daughter-in-law Vanessa Desjardins recently won the $1 million on a Western Millions game.

    Griesshaber likes to play Lotta Max when the jackpot gets high. He won on the Dec. 11 draw but only discovered his win a few weeks after.

    I had just washed my truck and went to check some tickets I found while cleaning, he said. I had to get the clerk to check it for me. I couldnt really believe what I was seeing.

    Griesshaber hasnt made any concrete plans for his winnings, but said he will most likely start by paying some bills.

    Im still in a little bit of shock, he said. Ill

    pay off my mortgage and probably book a vacation somewhere hot maybe Hawaii.

    He purchased his winning ticket at the Fas Gas Penhold Service. The Desjardins bought their ticket at Penhold Family Foods.

    Perspectives Series welcomes chairman of Truth and Reconciliation Commission

    Red Deer Colleges Perspectives Series returns with the chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada talking about the harrowing experiences of Aboriginal people and Residential Schools.

    Justice Murray Sinclair, of the Manitoba Court of Queens Bench, will talk on