red deer advocate, march 30, 2016

Download Red Deer Advocate, March 30, 2016

Post on 27-Jul-2016

244 views

Category:

Documents

11 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

March 30, 2016 edition of the Red Deer Advocate

TRANSCRIPT

  • Your Career Path Your Skills Peoples Lives

    RED DEER RECRUITING TRIP APRIL 7

    NOW HIRING

    Free Information Session

    Register at: /reddeer

    B5

    A3CALGARY ARTIST USES PAINT TO BECOME MAN OF STEEL BEFORE YOUR EYES

    ABSTRACT ARTIST EXPERIMENTS WITH ITEMS CLOSE AT HAND

    KAYAKER SETSSIGHTS ON RETURN

    GADGETS PROMISING A BETTER YOU

    B1

    PLEASE RECYCLE

    W E D N E S D A Y M A R C H 3 0 2 0 1 6

    www . r e d d e e r a d v o c a t e . c om$1 . 0 0

    B9

    INDEX RED DEER WEATHER

    NEWS A2-A3, A5, A7-A8COMMENT A4

    BUSINESS A9-A10SPORTS B1-B4

    HEALTH B5CLASSIFIED B6-B7

    COMICS B8ENTERTAINMENT B9

    ADVICE B10

    LOTTERIES

    TUESDAY

    EXTRA: 5473696

    PICK 3: 054

    Numbers are unofficial.

    Local Today Tonight Thursday Friday

    A7DRUNK DRIVER JAILED 10 YEARS

    11

    Cloudy

    3

    30% Showers

    13

    Sun and Cloud

    18

    Sunny

    KEEPING HIS BALANCE

    Photo by ASHLI BARRETT/Advocate staff

    Vincent Russell, 5, tries to keep his balance as he crosses a balance beam at the Rotary Park playground Tuesday afternoon. With temperatures reaching 12 C, and many children on spring break, the park was one of the busier places in the city.

    Trudeau fires back at critics of EI changes during Calgary visitBY THE CANADIAN PRESS

    CALGARY Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pushed back at critics who say changes made to employment in-surance to help the struggling energy sector dont go far enough.

    Trudeau said in an interview with Global Calgary that people in Edmon-ton and Saskatchewan who complain

    of being left out of changes to the pro-gram should feel fortunate their areas have not been harder hit by the down-turn in energy prices.

    I think that both people in Ed-monton and Saskatchewan should be pleased that they are not hit as hard as

    other parts of the country and indeed the province have been, Trudeau said in the interview. Were of course go-ing to keep monitoring to make sure were doing everything we can for the places that need it.

    Last weeks federal budget boost-ed employment insurance benefits in some parts of the country, but left some areas of the oilpatch out.

    The government said it picked 12

    regions that needed the most help with extra weeks of benefits for jobless workers. Those include Newfoundland and Labrador, parts of northern and southern Alberta, northern British Columbia, northern Manitoba, north-ern Ontario, northern Saskatchewan, Whitehorse and Nunavut.

    Councilapproves17 budget guidelines

    Belt-tightening is ahead for city de-partments as work begins on the 2017 operating and capital budgets.

    By a split vote of 5-4, council ap-proved a set of guidelines for admin-istration to use when planning next years spending.

    Council directed administration to achieve an overall 2.5 per cent tax rate increase which includes a one per cent growth and amenities contribution. Basically its a one per cent increase to the existing budgets.

    Administration had recommended a no more than 3.5 per cent tax rate as a starting point but Coun. Dianne Wyntjes successfully argued to bring the number down one per cent or $1.2 million in targeted savings.

    Councillors Wyntjes, Mayor Tara Veer, Tanya Handley, Buck Buchanan and Frank Wong voted in support of the guidelines.

    Wyntjes said this gives a message that council is in touch with the com-munity and is disciplined when it comes to the budgets. She said council is well aware of the tough times with job losses and layoffs in the communi-ty.

    We talk about innovation, creativ-ity, belt-tighten and doing things dif-ferently, said Wyntjes. This is an op-portunity for us to see what our admin-istration can come up with some num-bers . There are a lot of unknowns but the leadership starts with us at the top and we have to give that direction.

    BY PAUL COWLEYADVOCATE STAFF

    HolmeHus Antiques owner Susan Manyluk has fought before to save trees near her Red Deer County home from being chopped down.

    Now, shes once again defending the treasured line of old black poplars on Township Road 282 about five km west of Red Deer.

    The county has informed her it wants to take down the stretch of trees in a road allowance lining the route south of Hwy 11A to improve safety and visibility on the well-used route.

    It is a travesty. I dont know what else you can call it, said Manyluk, who has lived practically in the trees shade for 39 years. Some of those trees are 100 years old.

    She points out these venerable nat-ural inhabitants of the rural landscape gave Poplar Ridge its name. It has been estimated only about 10 per cent of Central Albertas original poplar forests remain, heightening the im-portance of protecting what is left, she said.

    RED DEER COUNTY

    BY CRYSTAL RHYNOADVOCATE STAFF

    Infrastructure minister visits Central Alberta Page A2

    Please see TREES on Page A8 Please see BUDGET on Page A8

    Please see TRUDEAU on Page A8

    Plan to chop trees

    pannedIT IS A TRAVESTY,

    SAYS CRITIC

  • Reports that the birds are back in town are true. Also true, thanks to a mild winter, is some never left in the first place.

    Several observers have recently re-ported seeing more than a usual num-ber of bald eagles in the Olds and Sun-dre areas.

    The large birds, which at one point were endangered but are now classed as a sensitive species, are being seen in increasing numbers because they are making their annual migration north, into and through the area.

    Carol Kelly, executive director of the Medicine River Wildlife Centre located north of Olds and Sundre, said Monday that while eagles migrate south in the fall, some stay if the win-ter is milder because they have more access to food.

    Thats what happened this past win-ter in Central Alberta where mild and even summer-like weather has also led to an early spring. Temperatures fore-cast for Friday and Saturday are ex-pected to reach highs of 18C and 19C.

    It is also common to notice eagles

    more now as spring calving is under-way, and when a calf doesnt survive farmers will sometimes leave the car-cass out in the field for wild animals.

    Eagles are one of the first animals to come in and feed, Kelly said.

    Some of the birds are coming back earlier. Im standing, looking out my

    window and my bluebird is back. In fact the two of them are here looking at nests, Kelly said Monday.

    Judy Boyd, a long-time local bird watcher and enthusiast, said she has noted eight bald eagles nests already this spring when normally she sees three or four.

    Boyd said it is hard to say why there are more it could just be that shes just been more successful this year with monitoring.

    One bald eagle has moved onto an osprey nest, which has always been used by osprey in the past. The osprey are not back yet, she said.

    The nests are marked with GPS for personal interest, but also in the event the Medicine River Wildlife Centre receives an orphaned bird. The bird can then be placed in the nest of new parents that have young ones about the same age.

    Boyd said it was an unusual winter as she counted a lot of cedar waxwings during the Christmas bird count. Nor-mally this species migrates south.

    She said she also spotted white-winged crossbills and red crossbills over the winter. Usually these birds arent seen locally.

    PIKE WHEATON

    *All rebates to dealer. Price includes Owner Loyalty and must be proven by six months of ownership on any motor vehicle 99 or newer. Payment based on 60 month term at 1.5%. With 2500 down or equivalent trade. Residual value 5851. Price 400 admin, 20 tire, tax 6.25 Amvic.

    www.pikewheaton.com

    3110 GAETZ AVE., RED DEERLOCAL 403-347-3301 TOLL FREE 1-800-661-0995

    DRIVE AWAYWITHOUT PAYING

    2016 CHEVROLET CRUZE LIMITED 2LS

    7517601C

    28-D2

    ON NOW UNTIL MARCH 30ON NOW UNTIL MARCH 30

    NOW $18,205OR $8715BW

    E V E N T

    MITED 2LSCRUZE CRUZE LIMITED 2LSMIIILLR ZE SCRUZE LIMITED 2LS

    Wednesday, March 30, 2016NEWS A2

    Sunrise7:16

    Sunset8:02

    Local Today

    Rocky Mountain House

    Sylvan Lake

    Olds, Innisfail

    Ponoka

    Stettler

    Lacombe

    TokyoTorontoVancouver

    Sun and Cloud11 2

    Mainly cloudy12 2

    Sun & Cloud10 1

    Sun & Cloud12 2

    Mainly cloudy11 2

    Mainly cloudy10 1

    Sun & Cloud11 2

    Mainly sunny14

    Mainly sunny9 6

    Sunny17 8

    Partly cloudy11 2

    Sun and Cloud12 5

    Sunny18 3

    Sat

    18

    Sun

    8

    Mon

    16

    Tonight Thursday FridayTHE WEATHER

    The regions weatherfor tonight

    Fort McMurray 11/-6

    Grande Prairie13/0

    Jasper13/2

    Banff 12/1 Calgary

    13/3

    Lethbridge13/3

    2 12 18

    Edmonton13/1

    11

    Infrastructure minister visits Central Alberta

    Touting the Liberals maiden bud-get, Federal Infrastructure Minister Amarjeet Sohi met with Central Al-berta elected officials in Red Deer on Tuesday.

    Sohi rehashed the 2016 federal bud-get and explained the focus on growth, job creation and investing in seniors, families with children, Indigenous communities and middle-class Cana-dians.

    We understand that in the past the federal government has not done a good job at communicating with mid-sized cities as well as rural commu-nities, said Sohi. I was surprised to learn I was the first minister to pay a visit to City Hall for a long, long time. To us, that is not how we want to do business. We want to do business by being inclusive. We want to do busi-ness by listening to all sorts of commu-nities and municipalities