red deer advocate, april 25, 2016

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April 25, 2016 edition of the Red Deer Advocate

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  • A9B9COLLECTIVE SOUL BRINGS THE ROCK AND ROLL

    REBELS HEAD HOME DOWN 2-0

    SCRAPS GO UPSCALE

    TOUGH TIMES FOR ENGINEERING STUDENTS

    B5

    PLEASE RECYCLE

    M O N D A Y A P R I L 2 5 2 0 1 6

    www . r e d d e e r a d v o c a t e . c om$1 . 0 0

    B1

    INDEX RED DEER WEATHER

    NEWS 2,3,5,7,8

    COMMENT A4

    SPORTS B1-4

    BUSINESS: A9-10

    ENTERTAINMENT: B9

    FOOD: B5

    COMICS B8

    LOTTERIES

    SATURDAY

    6/49: 14 ,29, 37 ,41, 48, 49

    bonus: 31

    Western 6/49: 1, 11, 12, 13, 17,

    37, bonus: 22SUNDAY

    Pick 3: 477

    Extra: 2384398

    Numbers are unofficial.

    Local Today Tonight Tuesday Wednesday

    XXXXX 60% showersCloudy Sun and Cloud 40% showers

    BY MARY-ANN BARRADVOCATE STAFF

    On any given day, an average of about 32,000 vehi-cles pass by Innisfail on Hwy 2.

    If youre a billboard owner, its not a bad place to put one.

    But of youre Faye Hallett, and the billboard sign is electronic, its not a great idea.

    Hallett, who lives in Red Deer, is concerned about electronic billboards on the highway and the distrac-tion they cause at night.

    One winter night as she was heading south on Hwy 2, concentrating on the road and fast traffic, she was startled by the electronic billboard on the west side of the highway at Innisfail.

    All a sudden to my right, going through Innisfail some huge electronic flash just scared me silly, and I jerked my vehicle. It took me several seconds to realize it was a billboard.

    Again, recently she was on the highway at night and found the electronic signage distracting. Theres another electronic billboard on the west side of Hwy 2 just south of Bowden.

    Halletts concern is that electronic billboards are too distracting to drivers. She believes they should not be allowed beside the highway and raised the issue with the provincial government in January but is still waiting to hear back.

    Alberta Transportation does not allow electronic signs within the development control zone of rural provincial highways but it does offer a list of recom-mended practices. Municipalities are responsible for approvals outside the right-of-way.

    Alberta Transportation encourages both rural and urban municipalities not to permit electronic message signs adjacent to provincial highway right-of-way, especially those that function as graphic and/or video display signs, it states on its website.

    The departments electronic message signs used to communicate safety and other pertinent informa-tion are permitted but governed by strict guidelines.

    It turns out the two-sided electronic billboard adjacent to Innisfail is owned by the Innisfail Cham-ber of Commerce and was approved by the Town of Innisfail.

    Dog Bos was Innisfail Chamber president when the sign was installed about five years ago. He said the electronic billboard was his idea.

    Now a town councillor, he said revenue from the sign has been key in helping the Chamber dig itself out of the red.

    The electronic billboard cost about $200,000. Ad-vertising on it generates about $2,000 per month net revenue for the chamber and when it is paid off this fall, it will provide about $5,000 per month, Bos said, adding the funds allow the chamber to do more to help local businesses.

    He said he just returned from the United States where he noticed electronic signs everywhere, and there are a number of them around Central Alberta now.

    The Chamber LED sign has a sensor so it is about 90 per cent of its capable brightness during the day, and dims down to about 30 per cent at night.

    Bos said he has only heard a couple of complaints and one was about three years ago when the light sensor malfunctioned so it was too bright at night but was quickly repaired.

    BY MARY-ANN BARRADVOCATE STAFF

    A national nonprofit group has arrived in Red Deer to help people improve their computer skills in an ever-increasing digital world.

    Ladies Learning Code will offers workshops to help people learn technical skills and computer pro-gramming so they can do things like build web pages and place content on them, said Mary Medinsky.

    Medinsky, a librarian, and Edward McIntyre, a web developer, are co-leads for the new Red Deer chapter of Ladies Learning Code.

    I definitely see how people are impacted every day by having strong digital literacy skills. The world is complicated and theres a lots out there and to be able to navigate that effectively requires some under-standing of whats happening in the background.

    Ladies Learning Code workshops are open to men and women, and the Red Deer chapter hopes to branch into childrens classes as well. The code.mo-bile, a travelling commuter lab for children, is coming to Red Deer this summer but the date hasnt been an-nounced, Medinsky said.

    The workshops have one mentor for every four stu-dents who want to learn beginner-friendly computer programming and other technical skills, Medinsky said. Participants will need to bring their own laptop, and have some understanding about using a comput-er and common applications. There is a charge per workshop to recover costs however scholarships are available for people who demonstrate financial need, Medinsky said.

    The goal is to open it up for as many people as possible.

    People who want to learn how websites work, from content consumers to content creators would ben-

    efit. Small business owners may want to learn more about how to manage their websites and create on-line stores, or artists may just want to showcase their work, she said.

    The world is changing and this is a great way to be able to participate in what the new digital world looks like.

    Started by a group of women in 2011 in Toronto, Ladies Learning Code is now in over 20 cities in Can-ada. They also have Girls Learning Code and Kids Learning Code chapters. The first Red Deer workshop CSS/HTML for Beginners launches May 14. Par-ticipants will learn to build a one-page website from scratch. It runs from 10 to 4 p.m. at the Welikoklad Event Centre, at 4922 49 St. For more information go to the website page: ladieslearningcode.com/chap-ters/red-deer or Facebook at Ladies Learning Code - Red Deer Chapter.

    Sign, sign, everywhere

    a signELECTRONIC BILLBOARD ON QEII MIGHT DISTRACT DRIVERS BUT MAKES MONEY FOR CHAMBER

    FULL SWING

    New nonprofit demystifies digital world

    Photo by ASHLI BARRETT/Advocate staff

    Caroline See of Miss Behavin shows some swing dancers how to jazz up some dance moves during a Saturday afternoon Swing Dance workshop at Dance Traxx Studio. The workshop ran throughout the day, and was part of Alberta Inspiration Week activities in the city. Live music, performances and social dancing all took place.

    Photo by JEFF STOKOE/Advocate staff

    Edward McIntyre and Mary Medinsky are chapter co-leads of Ladies Learning Code.

    See SIGN on Page A8

    9 4 14 9

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    2525TTHH AANNIVERSARY SALENNIVERSARY SALE

    Monday, April 25, 2016NEWS A2

    Sunrise6:15

    Sunset8:52

    Local Today

    Rocky Mountain House

    Sylvan Lake

    Olds, Innisfail

    Ponoka

    Stettler

    Lacombe

    OrlandoMontrealKelowna

    Cloudy

    A few showers8 1

    Cloudy12 1

    Cloudy9 0

    Cloudy11 1

    30% Showers9 4

    Cloudy11 1

    Sun and Cloud30 19

    Sunny11 0

    Sun and Cloud17 3

    60% Showers Sun and Cloud 40% Showers

    Thur

    17

    Fri

    15

    Sat

    15

    Tonight Tuesday WednesdayTHE WEATHER

    The regions weatherfor tonight

    Fort McMurray 9/2

    Grande Prairie12/2

    Jasper10/1

    Banff 9/1 Calgary

    9/3

    Lethbridge9/2

    4 14 9

    Edmonton10/4

    9

    BY PAUL COWLEYADVOCATE STAFF

    Efforts to control Albertas wild horse population through adoption and contraception are working, says the group behind the programs.

    Bob Henderson, of the Wild Horses of Alberta So-ciety (WHOAS), hopes that wont be lost on the prov-ince, which has yet to commit to abandoning what was becoming an almost annual roundup of dozens of horses.

    Henderson said adoption has proven successful with 34 horses adopted out in the last year, and more than 80 in the last few years.

    Things are going pretty good for us, he said. Weve adopted everything weve had come through our facility.

    There was some concern the economy and high hay costs could pose a problem, but that hasnt mate-rialized.

    There are people willing to step up to the plate and take on these wildies and turn them into their own horses. Its good. We havent had any issues yet.

    A pilot project to target fertile mares with contra-ception darts is also on track.

    We had a good winter. Were running pretty much on target with what our reproduction biolo-gists have told us we have to hit.

    Biologists recommended targeting about 80 mares with a contraception that prevents pregnancy for three years. More than 70 have been darted so far in the wilderness west of Sundre. A few tweaks to the dart gun, improving the barrel for better range and accuracy, has paid off, he said. A small tracked ve-hicle was also purchased by the society to better get into the back country. The contraception program is on hold for foaling season, but they will go out again in the summer to reach a few more. It also allows the group to track and document the herds.

    It