red deer advocate, march 21, 2016

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March 21, 2016 edition of the Red Deer Advocate

TRANSCRIPT

  • A9

    A6IN PHOTOS: SLED DOGS BONEFIGHT COMPETITION

    CANADA DOWNS USA AT CURLING WORLDS

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    B2

    INDEX RED DEER WEATHER

    NEWS: A2,3,5,7,8

    COMMENT: A4

    SPORTS: B1-4

    ENTERTAINMENT:B9

    BUSINESS: A9-10

    CLASSIFIEDS: B6-7

    COMICS: B8

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    Local Today Tonight Tuesday Wednesday

    XXXXX 30% flurriesSnow 60% flurries Sunny & Cloudy

    BY LANA MICHELINADVOCATE STAFF

    When his pregnant daughter called for a ride, Doug Brown thought hed have time for a cup of cof-fee before driving her to the hospital.

    Mother Nature proved him wrong.Tiffany Brown had three contractions by the

    time we got to the Alberta Springs Golf Course, re-called Doug, who ended up delivering his grandson on the side of Hwy 11 at 4:45 a.m. on Jan. 9.

    Doug had taken on hospital driving duty because his daughters partner, Chris Foster, was still ap-prenticing as a millwright in Lloydminster when Tiffany went into labour. The young couple believed there would be plenty of time until the birth, since their second child wasnt due until Jan. 23.

    But there wasnt time.This isnt supposed to happen, Doug remembers

    thinking, after his daughter said, Dad, I think the heads coming

    I thought: Oh dear god, here we are. This is real life happening here! Doug recalled.

    The outside temperature was -25 C when he pulled off the dark, mostly empty highway. He parked his truck near the entrance to the golf course and called 911.

    Although Doug remembers being calm because I had to be, he appreciated hearing what to expect from emergency dispatcher Alanna Robertson. She said get a good hold of him, (the babys) going to be really slippery when he comes out, Doug recalled.

    All it took was one push by Tiffany, and Doug was holding his newborn grandson, Owen who is brother to Patrick, age 20 months.

    After the infant started breathing and crying, Doug wrapped him up in his jacket. Robertson told Doug to use one of his shoelaces to tie off the umbil-ical chord about six inches from the babys belly and then to wait for the ambulance to arrive.

    Tiffany and her newborn were taken by para-medics to hospital, where Owen weighed in at seven pounds, three ounces. There were no birth complica-tions.

    Ten weeks later, mom and baby are doing so well they wanted to thank Robertson in person for her assistance. Along with Grandpa Doug, the whole Syl-

    van Lake family met the emergency 911 dispatcher in Red Deer on Saturday to express appreciation.

    BY LANA MICHELINADVOCATE STAFF

    Asdolah Khierandishs hand-woven rug tells a sto-ry of horror and hope.

    It recounts his history, as well as that of his war-torn homeland.

    Khierandish, a master rug weaver from Afghan-istan, designed the artistic carpet on display at the Red Deer Museum and Art Gallery as part of an exhibit about the Central Alberta Refugee Effort. It was the best handiwork Khierandish brought out of his country when fleeing from the Taliban, along with wife and three young children, in 2008.

    Like the family, the rug survived a long and per-ilous journey through Iran, Turkey and Syria before finally arriving in Red Deer in March, 2012.

    Yet this one-of-a-kind weaving was the item Khie-randish later chose to donate to a CARE fundraiser.

    Theres an Afghan saying: When you donate some-thing, give the best you have, said the rug maker, who wanted to express his gratitude through this gift for the assistance provided by CARE and other orga-nizations during his familys passage to Canada.

    The tapestry-like carpet, purchased by the Allard family of Red Deer, was woven in red-dyed wool, symbolizing those fighting for freedom in his coun-try. Slim, broken bands of blue denote hope for a better future, said Khierandish.

    Arrow-like symbols represent people joining to-gether, while a band of barbed-wire symbols repre-sent Taliban oppression in Afghanistan. Its a jail, said Khierandish, who nearly lost his life recording destruction in his village.

    He was two years old when the Soviets invaded Afghanistan in 1979.

    At age nine, Khierandish was sent to become a rug-weaving apprentice.

    CHECK, PLEASE

    Photo by ASHLI BARRETT/Advocate staff

    Defenceman Kayle Doetzel of the Red Deer Rebels and Ben Carroll of the Edmonton Oil Kings collide in the corner during their Saturday night WHL tilt at the Enmax Centrium. The Rebels defeated the Oil Kings 7-2. See related story on Page B1.

    Threads of hope

    HAND-WOVEN RUG RECOUNTS HISTORY OF AFGHANISTAN

    THIS IS REAL LIFE HAPPENING HERE!FAMILY DESCRIBES BABYS BIRTH ON HWY 11

    Photo by Lana Michelin/Advocate staff

    Red Deer emergency dispatcher Alanna Robertson meets Baby Owen, his mother, Tiffany Brown, and his grandfather, Doug Brown, who helped delivered the baby at the side of a road in Sylvan Lake.

    See BABY on Page A8

    See RUG on Page A8

    7 -5 -40

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    21-26

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    Monday, March 21, 2016NEWS A2

    Local Today

    Rocky Mountain House

    Sylvan Lake

    Olds, Innisfail

    Ponoka

    Stettler

    Lacombe

    HonoluluCancunKelowna

    Snow1 -5

    Snow-1 -7

    Snow-1 -5

    Snow0 -5

    Snow-1 -5

    Snow-1 -5

    Snow0 -6

    Sun & Cloud27 20

    Sun & Cloud24 19

    Sun & Cloud14 2

    30% Flurries1 -5

    60% Flurries0 -5

    Sunny & Cloudy4 -4

    Thu

    3

    Fri

    5

    Sat

    6

    Tonight Tue WedTHE WEATHER

    The regions weatherfor tonight

    Fort McMurray -2 / -12

    Grande Prairie -1 / -4

    Jasper 10 /1

    Banff 7 / -3 Calgary

    6 / -4

    Lethbridge 13/ -2

    7 -5 0 4

    BY THE CANADIAN PRESS

    BLACKFALDS The father of an Alberta politi-cian who died following a highway crash last Novem-ber says an RCMP search of the median has turned up his sons missing watch and eyeglasses.

    But Baljinder Bhullar says some of his sons oth-er personal effects including his kara a bracelet worn by Sikhs is still missing along with his cuf-flinks and shoes.

    Manmeet Bhullar, 35, died on Nov. 23, 2015, when he pulled over on Highway 2 between Calgary and Edmonton to help a stranded motorist and was struck in a chain-reaction crash.

    A special tactical operations team of the RCMP temporarily shut one lane each of the busy four-lane divided highway near Blackfalds on Saturday to search for some of Bhullars personal effects that have been missing since his death.

    Police say the search was not related to the inves-tigation into the crash that killed the Calgary mem-ber of the legislature.

    Baljinder Bhullar says he feels blessed that the searchers were able to find some of the missing items.

    Thanks to God, thanks to the RCMP who have spent the time, Bhullar said Saturday from Calgary.

    RCMP spokesperson Cpl. Sharon Franks couldnt say whether it was unusual in Alberta for police to assist in such a search, although she said having of-ficers present would assist in the safety. She didnt know what sparked the search four months after the accident, but suggested it might be due to the fact the crash occurred during a snowstorm and couldnt be easily searched at the time.

    An RCMP news release says police consulted with Alberta Transportation in launching the search.

    Franks said the search was concluded on Satur-day afternoon and that an item or items had been located, but she said she didnt know what they were.

    Bhullar served in three cabinet portfolios Ser-vice Alberta, Human Services and Infrastructure under the previous Conservative government.

    After Bhullars death, the World Sikh Organiza-tion praised the politician for his service, including his work on achieving the accommodation of the kir-pan in Alberta courthouses.

    Under the Alberta policy introduced in 2013, a person must tell security officers they have a kirpan and wear it in a sheath, under clothing and the blade of the kirpan can be no longer than 10 centimetres.

    The organization said at the time that it was the first province to adopt a policy that was uniform for all its courthouses.

    Bhullars watch, glasses found in highway search

    BY THE CANADIAN PRESS

    OTTAWA The political messaging that will weave through Justin Trudeaus first budget is poised to have a recognizable ring to it: reducing inequality while laying the groundwork for long-term economic growth.

    But delivering the most substantial items from the prime ministers election platform has been a tougher task than his government anticipated during the fall campaign.

    For starters, Trudeaus $10-billion deficit pro-jection is now widely expected to be three times the size.

    His Liberals will unveil their i