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The most delicious recipes with fruit.

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  • Kris Goegebeur Photography Joris Devos

    Fruity pastry

    Which apples make the best sou s? Which cherries are most suitable for cupcakes or macaroons?

    Do peaches go well with strawberry jam? Or do plums taste good with chocolate?

    And which fruit is most suited for the deep-fried beignets? Master patissier Kris Goegebeur takes a close look at eight di erent types of fruit,

    o ering a selection of best varieties and suggesting the best possible avour combinations for cakes and desserts. And the results are now before you: a book that contains no fewer than 60 ultimate fruit dessert recipes.

    ey are all surprising and all absolutely delicious!

    9 789401 402361

    Fruity pastryK

    ris Goegebeur

    www.lannoo.com

    Cover_patisserie met fruit.indd 3 16/08/12 16:51

  • 5Contents

    Foreword 7Author 7Foodpairing 9 1 Apples 10 Some varieties 17 Recipes with apples 20 Foodpairing with apple 48

    2 Pears 50 Some varieties 56 Recipes with pears 58 Foodpairing with pear 74

    3 Plums 80 Some varieties 87 Recipes with plums 88 Foodpairing with plum 100

    4 Cherries 104 Some varieties 111 Recipes with cherries 112 Foodpairing with cherry 126

    5 Peaches / apricots / nectarines 130 Some varieties 135 Recipes with peaches / apricots / nectarines 136

    6 Red fruit 152 Some varieties 158 Recipes with red fruit 160 Foodpairing with raspberry 180

    7 Berries 186 Recipes with berries 192 Foodpairing with red currant 200

    8 Rhubarb 204 Recipes with rhubarb 208 Foodpairing with rhubarb 212

    Basic recipes 216My fruit suppliers 221Recipe index 222

  • 1Apples

  • 55

    you probably imagine that you are consuming plenty of calories but nothing could be further from the truth. This is because pears contain lower levels of acids than many other fruits, which makes them seem sweeter by comparison. The quince is also a member of the pear family, but in a category apart. Quinces cannot be eaten raw. The bitter tannin in the peel and the hard, granular structure of the flesh makes them unpalatable. For this reason, they must be boiled or stewed before consumption. Quinces are also winter-hard and need a period with temperatures colder than 7 C in order to blossom. During growth, the fruits acquire a downy skin that is shed as full ripening approaches. In warmer climates, the fruits can be allowed to ripen on the branch, until the flesh becomes soft enough to be edible (although they must then be plucked before freezing weather sets in). In cooler climates, such as here in Northern Europe, the fruits are picked before they ripen, while they are still green. If they are allowed to ripen further, they turn a deep yellow colour, whilst simultaneous developing a pleasing aroma of flowers, in particular roses and citrus fruits. Because quinces contain such high quantities of pectin they are ideal for use in jams and compotes.

    Buying Choose pears that have a smooth peel, without bruising, dark spots, dents or tears, and with the stalk still intact. Pears are harvested and sold before they are fully ripe. They are at their best if firm, but not hard. The pears that you harvest from your own garden can be allowed to ripen at room temperature in a fruit basket. Pears that ripen in shops and supermarkets do so in climate-con-trolled conditions. They are fully ripe if the flesh around the bottom of the stalk yields when lightly pressed. Likewise with quinces, you should not buy wrinkled, soft or brownish-looking fruits. Ripe quinces are yellow. If they are green on purchase, allow them ripen at room temperature until they change colour and start to give off their distinctive floral aroma. If you do not want them to ripen immediately, they can be kept for a maximum of two weeks after purchase in the fridge. Once they are ripe, they should be used as soon as possible, since they start to rot quickly. If you peel and cut them but do not intend to use them immediately, rub lemon juice into them to prevent them from colouring.

    KeepingEating pears can be kept for a few days in a fridge or some other cool place. Ripe cooking pears can be kept in the same manner for about 1 week. To speed up the ripening process, you can keep the pears in a plain paper bag at room temperature. Because pears and quinces like apples give off large quantities of ethylene, it is important not to store them near other fruit.

    BakingWash the fruit thoroughly before use. Peel it, cut it into pieces and remove the core. Sprinkle the flesh with lemon juice immediately after peeling, otherwise it will quickly turn brown. Cooking pears should be peeled and then cooked either whole or halved, depending on their size. They should simmer gently for 3 to 4 hours in water or red wine, to which a cinnamon stick or a piece of lemon peel should be added. The pears will then colour red or pink (this is a natural process). Quinces should be peeled, cut into pieces and then boiled or stewed, with or without the addition of other types of pear and/or apple. During the cooking process, quince flesh also naturally changes colour from white-yellow to pink-red. Pears are delicious in cakes and pastries and in preparations with chocolate and almonds. In their pulped form, they are also excellent for making bavarois, sorbets, ice-cream, compotes and jam.

  • 76

    Pear charlotteINGREDIENTS:

    Sponge fingers:300 g egg white200 g sugar300 g egg yolks160 g sifted flour20 g cacao powder30 g potato starch flouricing sugar

    Meringue:150 g egg white250 g sugar7 cl water

    Pear mousse: 500 g Confrence pears10 egg yolks100 g sugar10 slices of soaked gelatine375 g half whipped cream

    Chocolate sauce:100 g icing sugar10 cl cream50 g butter100 g plain chocolate

    Rodenbach cream(see basic recipe for creams with alcoholic drinks)chocolate decoration1 Confrence pear

    Extras:2 charlotte moulds for 6 persons or flowers pots with a diameter of 14 cm and a depth of 14 cm / piping bag with a 1 cm nozzle

    PREPARATION

    Sponge fingers: Pre-heat the oven to 230 C.Beat together the egg white and the sugar, until they become stiff. Fold in the egg yolks with a spatula. Mix the sifted flour, cacao powder and the potato starch flour and stir this lightly into the egg mixture. Spoon into a piping bag and pipe out broad fingers. Sprinkle with icing sugar and bake for 7 minutes in the warm oven.Meringue: Beat the egg white. Boil the water and sugar until they form a syrup. Pour the syrup into the egg white and beat further until the mixture becomes stiff. Pear mousse: Peel the pears and remove the cores. Cut the flesh into pieces and reduce them to a puree in a blender. Lightly beat the egg yolks and fold in the sugar. Heat the pear mousse in a pan until it reaches boiling point. Add the egg mixture and heat to 86 C. Pass the mixture through a conical strainer. Squeeze the water out of the gelatine slices and stir them into the strained mixture. Allow to cool. Fill the charlotte moulds to a quarter of their depth with this pear mousse.Meringue: Heat the water and sugar to 121 C. Add the beaten egg white and continue beating off the heat.Chocolate sauce: Mix the icing sugar, cream and butter in a large pot and allow to simmer for 3 minutes. The pot must be sufficiently large to allow the mixture to expand and rise during cooking. Break the chocolate into pieces and stir into the mixture with a spatula. Allow to cool. Beat the cooled pear mixture until it becomes smooth and creamy. Fold in the half whipped cream with a spatula and finally add the meringue. Finishing: Arrange the sponge fingers around the edge of the moulds. Fill for one quarter with pear mouse and one quarter with Rodenbach cream. Fill the remainder of the mould with pear mousse and seal off the top with a further layer of sponge fingers. Allow to stiffen for 2 hours in the fridge. Remove from the mould and finish with melted chocolate sauce, slices of pear and chocolate decoration.

    Confrence

  • 77

  • 87

    01 Mirabelle de NancyThis small, yellow and very sweet plum has many uses. The yield is generally prolific, without any loss of qua-lity. Harvesting is from mid-August onwards.

    02 Priesse doubleThis is a small, multi-coloured and highly fragrant plum. Just a few plums in a bowl are sufficient to perfume an entire room. The yield is generally good and the picking season is long, beginning in mid-August.

    03 Prune de princeThis small, deep-blue and very sweet plum is of Belgian origin. It is about the same size as the Mirabelle de Nancy and is the best variety for serving with rabbit and game. The harvesting season is from the end of August to the middle of September.

    04 QUEEN VICTORIAThis is an old English variety with large, eggshaped fruits. Its juicy yellow flesh has a sweet flavour. Harves-ting is in the second half of August.

    05 JeffersonThis large, full, yellow plum has little juice and a hard skin, but is very tasty. It has a long picking season that begins in mid-August.

    06 Altesse doubleSome regard this as the best damson, with its typical shape and dark-blue colour. It is certainly the best cooking plum, with many different kitchen uses. Altesse double is picked at the end of August and its yield is regular rather than prolific.

    Some varieties01 03 05

    02 04 06

  • 113

  • 127

    www. .com

    Foodpairing with cherry

  • 138

  • 139

    Peach cupcakesINGREDIENTS: (For 6 persons)

    Basic cupcake mixture (see basic recipe)Use finely mixed peach flesh for the fruit compote100 g yellow/orange mar-zipan18 marzipan balls100 g sugar peach liqueur1 peach, cut in pieces

    Extras:piping bag / 18 cupcake moulds /pipettes

    PREPARATION

    Pre-heat the oven to 180 C. Make the cupcake mixture using an peach compote (see the basic cupcake recipe). Place a piece of peach in each cupcake mould. Fill the moulds with the cupcake mixture. Bake for 20 minutes in the warm oven.Decorate with the yellow/orange marzipan. Roll a ball of marzipan in sugar and place on top of each cupcake. Fill a pipette with the peach liqueur.

    Yellow peach

  • 169

  • 210

  • 211

    Dessert plate with rhubarbINGREDIENTS: (For 10 plates)

    madeleine cake mix (see basic recipe)

    Rhubarb filling:300 g rhubarb, cut in pieces300 g strawberry coulis100 g sugar

    Vanilla quinoa:30 cl cream1 vanilla stick, marrow only150 g quinoa50 g sugar

    Fried rhubarb:600 g rhubarb100 g butter80 g icing sugar

    200 g pre-baked puff pastry20 mint flowers

    Extra:moulds with a diameter of 8 cm

    PREPARATION

    Madeleine cake: Pre-heat the oven to 180 C. Divide the cake mix evenly between the moulds. Bake for 20 minutes in the warm oven. Rhubarb filling: Cook the rhubarb in the strawberry coulis and sugar until it is tender. Allow to cool.Vanilla quinoa: Mix the ingredients together and bring them to the boil, until they bind together well. Fried rhubarb: Cut the stalks of rhubarb lengthwise and fry them in the pan with some butter. When tender, sprinkle them with icing sugar. Remove from the pan and allow to drain on some kitchen paper.Finishing: Divide the rhubarb filling evenly between the moulds with the madeleine cake. Spoon in some vanilla quinoa and then top off the moulds with the fried rhubarb and some puff pastry. Decorate with the mint flowers.

    Rhubarb

  • 216

    Basic recipesINGREDIENTS: (For 2 cakes with a diame-ter of 21 cm)

    550 g flour300 g butter at room temperature2 g salt130 g icing sugar130 g almond powder2 eggs

    INGREDIENTS:

    1 kg flour300 g butter50 cl water2.5 g salt1 cl vinegar

    700 g butter120 g flour

    PREPARATION

    Mix the softened butter, salt, icing sugar and almond powder with a kitchen robot. Add the eggs and flour alternately until you get a nice short-crust dough. Allow to rest for at least 1 hour at room temperature.

    SuggestionsFor this recipe you can replace the almond powder with hazelnut powder, walnut powder, coconut powder, etc. If you want to make chocolate short-crust pastry, reduce the quantity of flour by 100 g and replace it with 100 g of cacao powder. Always roll the dough thin before cooking and bake at a maximum temperature of 180 C.

    PREPARATION

    Make a small hollow in the flour. Pour the water into the hollow. Mix the flour and the water. Knead in the 300 g of butter and the rest of the INGREDIENTS:. Sprinkle a work surface with flour and knead the dough until it is smooth and even. Wrap in plastic film and allow to rest for 3 hours in the fridge.Sprinkle a work surface with flour. Roll out the dough to a thickness of 1 cm. Mix the 700 g of butter with the 120 g of flour and spread this mixture evenly over two-thirds of the rolled sheet of dough. Fold the dough into three, starting with the unbuttered third. Roll the folded dough again, until it also has a thickness of 1 cm. Fold both ends of the dough into the centre, and then fold it double again. Wrap in plastic film and allow to rest for 3 hours in the fridge. Unwrap the dough and roll it out to a thickness of 1 cm. Once again, fold the rolled dough in three. Roll it out a final time and then fold it double, and double again. Re-wrap in plastic film and allow to rest for at least a further 24 hours in the fridge before use.

    SuggestionCan be kept for 3 months in the freezer

    Short-crust pastry

    Puff pastry

  • Kris Goegebeur Photography Joris Devos

    Fruity pastry

    Which apples make the best sou s? Which cherries are most suitable for cupcakes or macaroons?

    Do peaches go well with strawberry jam? Or do plums taste good with chocolate?

    And which fruit is most suited for the deep-fried beignets? Master patissier Kris Goegebeur takes a close look at eight di erent types of fruit,

    o ering a selection of best varieties and suggesting the best possible avour combinations for cakes and desserts. And the results are now before you: a book that contains no fewer than 60 ultimate fruit dessert recipes.

    ey are all surprising and all absolutely delicious!

    9 789401 402361

    Fruity pastryK

    ris Goegebeur

    www.lannoo.com

    Cover_patisserie met fruit.indd 3 16/08/12 16:51