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PAGE 30 THE VILLAGER August 5, 2010 THE VILLAGER NEWSPAPER AUGUST 5, 2010 REAL ESTATE HOME & GARDEN DEVELOPMENT di g s BY JENNIFER SCHAUFELE, DRCOG EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR A s the executive direc- tor of Denver Regional Council of Govern- ments, I am often faced with large volumes of technical data, discussions about legislation and trying to stretch a budget that cannot begin to fund all the trans- portation improvements needed in the region. The opportunity to discuss the Federal “Livable Com- munity Principles” with readers of The Villager is a pleasant diver- sion because I am reminded of the human benefits to the work of the Board of Directors and staff at DRCOG. The first Federal Livable Com- munity Principle is all about “al- ternative modes” of transportation. The principle recognizes how tran- sit, as well as bicycles and pedes- trian amenities, enhance a commu- nity’s quality of life. As a resident of Greenwood Village, I see enormous value in our access to light rail and all its existing and future connections. When combined with 42-plus miles of bike paths, 53 acres of streetscaping and more than 41 open space areas and urban parks sprinkled throughout the transpor- tation system, it’s clear Greenwood Village’s leadership has long been concerned with providing its resi- dents diverse, beautiful and func- tional choices for traveling to and from as well as throughout the city. Look how light rail has expand- ed our options. Just think of how frustrating it used to be getting to a Broncos game in your car: stuck in a traffic jam and hoping against hope you wouldn’t miss kick-off. And don’t forget the added cost and hassle of parking. Our teenag- ers now hop on the light rail for a quick ride to downtown Denver to meet friends at the 16 th Street Mall or to shop or step off the train and walk into the front door of the 3D IMAX theater at Colorado Center. We feel more comfortable as par- ents that our children are riding light rail than driving with their friends on I-25. As an added ame- nity, the Village has call-and-ride service to make getting to the sta- tion even easier. Investments increase benefits Investments in alternative modes of transportation only in- crease the benefits and choices of community denizens. Jing’s is a great example. You may think of this hot spot as a special place for a birthday dinner, but local owner Charlie Huang saw the transit-ori- ented development at The Land- mark as an open door that would serve to grow his business. Trans- portation alternatives, like our light rail line, increase economic empowerment for locally-owned businesses and make communities more livable, stable and sustain- able. Locally owned businesses bank locally, use local contractors, hire local talent and even buy fresh food from nearby farmers. They are also are frequently generous in their charitable contributions with- in the community. GV asset: bike paths One of Greenwood Village’s most outstanding assets is its bike paths and trails linking neighbor- hoods, schools, shopping and a multitude of office complexes in the community. You may be sur- prised to learn that last month, more than 350 people in Green- wood Village rode to their place of employment on Bike to Work Day. And, DRCOG’s data shows that taking part in that event motivates people to keep riding. About half the participants will try riding a bike now, not just to work, but also for all kinds of errands on a more regular basis. The Village’s trail system also provides recreational opportunities for children as well as the city’s retirees (more than 9 percent of our residents no longer work). Here, residents of all ages can be healthy, active and access all the activities and the beauty the Village has to offer. The federal livability principle concerning alternative transpor- tation modes is all about helping communities provide more choic- es, lower costs and better mobility accommodations. Greenwood Vil- lage is off to a very good start. GREENWOOD VILLAGE RTD Light Rail is a prime example of alternative modes of transportation that contribute to the concept of a city’s livability. PROVIDES MORE Landscaping and a contour ramp are more pleasing to the eye of the walker than plain old concrete slabs. Photos courtesy of DRCOG CENTENNIAL — The Den- ver Regional Council of Govern- ment Board of Directors awarded Centennial a $1.157 million dol- lar grant to reconstruct a portion of Arapahoe Road east of Holly Street to Krameria Street. Throughout the last 10 years, the city and other agencies have worked to improve Arapahoe be- tween Quebec Street and Univer- sity Boulevard, and the section be- tween Holly and Krameria is the last remaining portion that needs improvement. The project includes a com- plete reconstruction of the pave- ment and is expected to begin in spring 2011. Centennial has partnered with Arapahoe County, the Southeast Stormwater Authority over the last decade. “As a member of the DRCOG Board, I am pleased that we ap- proved funding for projects such as Arapahoe Road, Holly Street to Krameria Street in Centennial,” said Centennial Councilman Todd Miller. “I recognize transporta- tion needs are far greater than the resources available. Last week, DRCOG awarded approximately $56 million to various projects throughout the region, which is a step in the right direction.” Receipt of this grant allows for funding to be allocated to other projects in the city. City receives $1 million for Arapahoe Road TRANSPORTATION CHOIC ES MORE Denver Parade of Homes, Pg. 31 Feng Shui does the garden good, Pg. 32

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digs is a supplemental publication of The Villager Newspaper. Produced twice a month, this new section will feature stories about home improvement and décor, lawn/garden care and landscaping. Digs will also focus on real estate – supplying real estate agents and brokers with a platform to highlight their properties, expertise and services.

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  • PAGE 30 THE VILLAGER August 5, 2010

    The Villager Newspaper aUgUsT 5, 2010

    real esTaTehome & garDeN

    DeVelopmeNTdigsBy Jennifer Schaufele, DrcOG executive DirectOr

    As the executive direc-tor of Denver Regional Council of Govern-ments, I am often faced

    with large volumes of technical data, discussions about legislation and trying to stretch a budget that cannot begin to fund all the trans-portation improvements needed in the region. The opportunity to discuss the Federal Livable Com-munity Principles with readers of The Villager is a pleasant diver-sion because I am reminded of the human benefits to the work of the Board of Directors and staff at DRCOG.

    The first Federal Livable Com-munity Principle is all about al-ternative modes of transportation. The principle recognizes how tran-sit, as well as bicycles and pedes-trian amenities, enhance a commu-nitys quality of life.

    As a resident of Greenwood Village, I see enormous value in our access to light rail and all its existing and future connections. When combined with 42-plus miles of bike paths, 53 acres of streetscaping and more than 41 open space areas and urban parks sprinkled throughout the transpor-tation system, its clear Greenwood Villages leadership has long been concerned with providing its resi-dents diverse, beautiful and func-tional choices for traveling to and from as well as throughout the city.

    Look how light rail has expand-ed our options. Just think of how frustrating it used to be getting to a Broncos game in your car: stuck in a traffic jam and hoping against hope you wouldnt miss kick-off. And dont forget the added cost and hassle of parking. Our teenag-ers now hop on the light rail for a quick ride to downtown Denver to meet friends at the 16th Street Mall or to shop or step off the train and walk into the front door of the 3D IMAX theater at Colorado Center. We feel more comfortable as par-ents that our children are riding light rail than driving with their friends on I-25. As an added ame-nity, the Village has call-and-ride

    service to make getting to the sta-tion even easier.

    Investments increase benefits

    Investments in alternative modes of transportation only in-crease the benefits and choices of community denizens. Jings is a great example. You may think of this hot spot as a special place for a birthday dinner, but local owner Charlie Huang saw the transit-ori-ented development at The Land-mark as an open door that would serve to grow his business. Trans-portation alternatives, like our light rail line, increase economic empowerment for locally-owned businesses and make communities more livable, stable and sustain-able. Locally owned businesses bank locally, use local contractors, hire local talent and even buy fresh

    food from nearby farmers. They are also are frequently generous in their charitable contributions with-in the community.

    GV asset: bike pathsOne of Greenwood Villages

    most outstanding assets is its bike paths and trails linking neighbor-hoods, schools, shopping and a multitude of office complexes in the community. You may be sur-prised to learn that last month, more than 350 people in Green-wood Village rode to their place of employment on Bike to Work Day. And, DRCOGs data shows that taking part in that event motivates people to keep riding. About half the participants will try riding a bike now, not just to work, but also for all kinds of errands on a more regular basis. The Villages trail system also provides recreational

    opportunities for children as well as the citys retirees (more than 9 percent of our residents no longer work). Here, residents of all ages can be healthy, active and access all the activities and the beauty the Village has to offer.

    The federal livability principle concerning alternative transpor-tation modes is all about helping communities provide more choic-es, lower costs and better mobility accommodations. Greenwood Vil-lage is off to a very good start.

    greeNwooD Village

    RTD Light Rail is a prime example of alternative modes of transportation that contribute to the concept of a citys livability.

    p r ov i d e s more

    Landscaping and a contour ramp are more pleasing to the eye of the walker than plain old concrete slabs. Photos courtesy of DRCOG

    CENTENNIAL The Den-ver Regional Council of Govern-ment Board of Directors awarded Centennial a $1.157 million dol-lar grant to reconstruct a portion of Arapahoe Road east of Holly Street to Krameria Street.

    Throughout the last 10 years, the city and other agencies have worked to improve Arapahoe be-

    tween Quebec Street and Univer-sity Boulevard, and the section be-tween Holly and Krameria is the last remaining portion that needs improvement.

    The project includes a com-plete reconstruction of the pave-ment and is expected to begin in spring 2011.

    Centennial has partnered with

    Arapahoe County, the Southeast Stormwater Authority over the last decade.

    As a member of the DRCOG Board, I am pleased that we ap-proved funding for projects such as Arapahoe Road, Holly Street to Krameria Street in Centennial, said Centennial Councilman Todd Miller. I recognize transporta-

    tion needs are far greater than the resources available. Last week, DRCOG awarded approximately $56 million to various projects throughout the region, which is a step in the right direction.

    Receipt of this grant allows for funding to be allocated to other projects in the city.

    City receives $1 million for arapahoe road

    TraNsporTaTioN ChoiCes

    MORE Denver Parade of Homes, Pg. 31 Feng Shui does the garden good, Pg. 32

  • August 5, 2010 THE VILLAGER PAGE 31

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    digs

    The Home Builders Associa-tion of Metro Denver (HBA) an-nounced details for the 2010 Den-ver Parade of Homes, a summer tradition with a new format. The event runs Aug. 14 through Labor Day, Sept. 6, throughout metro Denver.

    Visitors can see 58 homes in 21 cities across the front range. For the first time in the Parades 23-year history, entry to tour these homes is free. All the homes are new, never lived in and offer the greatest range of prices. The homes are for sale. Some are luxury custom homes, others are furnished models, some are town-homes, and one features land that is available for sale to build a home.

    The Parade features 25 custom and national builders.

    Within the 58 homes are eight Dream Homes, priced from $1 million to $6.3 million. The Dream Homes are custom luxury homes that are furnished, deco-rated and landscaped as tradi-tional Parade homes have been in the past. Entry is a suggested one-time $5 donation to Muscular Dystrophy Association. All mon-ies raised will benefit MDA.

    The value of the Parade homes is more than $42 million. The Parade invites visitors to explore homes in established neighbor-hoods, on golf courses, on expan-sive acreage or in popular mid-town locales like Lowry and Sta-pleton. Other homes are situated on or near water and many have outstanding views of the Rocky Mountains. The home styles in-clude ranch, Colorado rustic, Tus-can, townhomes, starter homes and luxury custom.

    This broad range of new homes offers a price point for almost every category from the first-time home buyer, step-up buyer, empty-nester, and to the luxury custom buyer, Pelletier said.

    Home prices range from $188,900 to $6.3 million.

    Hours, days and timesThe 2010 Denver Parade of

    Homes is open daily from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Entry is free except for a one-time $5 donation to visit the Dream Homes.

    21 cities throughout Denver

    The following is a list of cit-ies and the number of homes that can be seen: Arvada (2), Aurora (11), Brighton (1), Broomfield (4), Castle Rock (5), Commerce City (3), Denver (6), Eliza-beth (1), Erie (2), Frederick (1), Golden (2), Greenwood Village (1), Highlands Ranch (2), Lafay-ette (1), Littleton (1), Lone Tree (2), Longmont (1), Loveland (1), Parker (8), Thornton (2), and Westminster (1).

    Official ParadeGuides

    The official guides are avail-able at American Furniture Ware-house stores in the Denver area or in the south area at: Aurora: 1700 South Abilene Centennial: 8281 South Univer-

    sity Blvd. Douglas County, Englewood,

    Parker: 8820 American Way, EnglewoodAll monies donated to visit the

    Dream Homes will benefit MDA. Donations can be made at any one of the seven metro area American Furniture Warehouse locations or online.

    For more details or to make a donation, visit www.ParadeOf-HomesDenver.com or call 303-778-1400.

    Denver Paradeof Homes opens Aug. 14

    This home at 6453 E. Ida Ave. (near Monaco and Orchard) built by Castleton Construction, is priced at $3,145,000. This grand Tuscan Villa. 6,720-square-foot home features five bedrooms, three living levels, eight baths, a six-car garage, five outdoor entertaining areas, five fireplaces, a paved brick veranda, steam shower, walk-out lower level, custom 500-bottle wine room, cad 5 wiring, built-in vacuum, and professional established landscape.

    Photo courtesy of HBA of Metro Denver

    58 new homes open for viewing for free

  • PAGE 32 THE VILLAGER August 5, 2010 digs

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    Submitted by by michelle cobb, blue iriS landScapeS

    Have you ever entered a room and felt the tension in the air but didnt know why? Have you ever rearranged the furniture in a room over and over until it felt right? That is energy! That is what Feng Shui is all about.

    Feng Shui literally translates to Wind and Water. Wind represents the unseen energy or chi. Wa-ter represents the seen, or physical objects we place around ourselves. Energy is all around us. Like wind, we cant see it but we feel its affect on us.

    Our landscapes have become our outdoor living spaces. In Colo-rado, we live and play outside all year long. We long to have our own oasis that we can sink into to escape our everyday chaos. Feng Shui is about creating that feel good feeling.

    Feng Shui in the garden is about creating an outdoor space that you love to live in. For the most part, its about good design. A good landscape or garden design will have good energy and good flow. Its about creating an environment that supports us and makes us feel good. When you feel good, isnt it

    easier to handle what life throws at you?

    Feng Shui Garden tips Make sure your house numbers can be easily seen from the street. Whether its on an ad-dress rock or mailbox if your house is set back from the street or on your house itself, its good to have your address visi-ble to passers-by. Not only does it make it easy for the pizza de-livery to be able to find you, but also the front door is where the energy enters your home.

    Make sure there is a clear path to your front door. Again, this sounds like just good common sense. You would be surprised at how many clients houses I have gone to that I had trouble finding the front door.

    Clear the clutter. We tend to do this once or twice a year inside our home, but the outside needs it too. Clearing the clutter from the yard (cutting back ornamen-tal grasses, perennials, picking up leaves and trash the winter winds blew in, etc.) clears out old, stagnant energy and makes room for new adventures and opportunities.

    Use gentle sweeping curves. Sometimes people try to cre-ate interest in their yard by us-ing squiggly lines. (edger lines, patios, pathways, etc.) A better way to do that is to use larger, sweeping curves. It looks bet-ter and creates a calmer, more comfortable feeling in a space.

    Add bold color. In the right plac-es, adding high energy colors (red, yellow, magenta) will at-tract energy. For example, near your front door add some col-orful pots with brightly colored annuals. This will draw the eye (and the positive energy) to the front door of your home.

    Place things in pairs in the far right corner of the back yard. This is your relationship area. Relationships are about two people. Could be a romantic relationship or even mother-daughter or brother-sister rela-tionship. The pairs in this area support and represent the rela-tionship between two people.

    Add movement and sound. A waterfall, fountain, or a sooth-ing wind chime can add a new element to your outdoor space that attracts energy and creates a comfortable feeling. Sound also helps counteract street noise.

    You will find that spending time in an outdoor space that you love will expand your living space and give you a sense of satisfaction. You also can more easily address weeds and other issues before they become a bigger stress if you are in your outdoors space on a daily or weekly basis. Feng Shui is a common sense,

    good design approach that can be used to create a good feeling. For more information, visit www.BlueIrisLandscapes.com or call 303-346-8115

    Feng Shui in the Garden~ Good Feng Shui makes good sense

    Add a waterfall or fountain that can add a new element to your outdoor space that attracts energy and creates a comfortable feeling. Sound also helps counteract street noise.

    Photo courtesy of Blue Iris Landscapes

    VIL_8-5-10_P30_KVIL_8-5-10_P31_KVIL_8-5-10_P32_K