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PAGE 8 THE VILLAGER November 4, 2010 Ali's Cleaning Service Residential & Commercial Window Cleaning Licensed & Insured CALL ... 720-300-6731 OR EMAIL ... [email protected] Ali Colocho, Manager www.a-teamelectronics.com | [email protected] a-team inc. SUPER SIZE YOUR SECURITY SYSTEM • Don’t Just Detect Danger, Prevent It! • Prevent Intrusion • Prevent water and freeze damage • Control Lighting • Control Energy • Instant Medical Response CUSTOM MEDIA ROOMS • WATCH: Movies, Sports, Live Concerts • PLAY: Video games • LEARN: Languages, classes, interactive skills • TRANSACT: Business, conferences, banking • ENTERTAIN: Pictures, videos Contact us today. Brian Beck 303.570.1365 “Your Satisfaction is Our Goal” Family Owned Established 1949 2659 W. MAIN ST. LITTLETON, CO 80120 PHONE 303-795-1323 FAX 795-1325 www.UniqueLandscapesAndGardensInc.com UNIQUE LANDSCAPES & GARDENS dream it If you can we can build it. 303.274.0201 digs BY JENNIFER SCHAUFELE DRCOG EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR W e’re now at the sixth of the livable communi- ties principles that will conclude my discussion with you about the federal partnership for sustainable communities between the Environmental Protection Agency, Housing and Urban De- velopment office, and the Depart- ment of Transportation. We’ve talked about choices in transporta- tion and housing, the importance of economic competitiveness, pre- serving community character, and leveraging partnerships. The last principle is the one that could be thought of as summing things up. Value communities and neighborhoods Enhance the unique character- istics of all communities by invest- ing in healthy, safe, and walkable neighborhoods — rural, urban, or suburban. You might be thinking to your- self, how can a rural community be considered walkable? For that matter, what about my subur- ban home and how can that be considered on the same level as somebody who lives in downtown Denver? Maybe we need to start by talk- ing about why a walkable com- munity is important, and where and why we’re walking. Walkable neighborhoods are those with con- nections -- connections to trails and connections to services. That’s how a walkable neighborhood can look different depending on where you are. You could be walking be- tween different shops, restaurants and other places that provide ser- vices you need in an urban area; you could be walking to visit with friends or take your kids to school, or you could be walking to enjoy the outdoors and promote your health. Different uses may require sidewalks, they may require well- maintained trails, and in a truly walkable environment you can get from one to the other without stretches between where access on foot is difficult. Here in Green- wood Village, we have elements of rural, suburban and urban envi- ronments. Recreational walkers who en- joy the Marjorie Perry open space can connect with a network of communities by way of the High- line Canal Trail. That trail runs 66 miles through three counties. It’s one of the most popular rec- reational trails in greater Denver area, and accommodates not only walkers, but runners and cyclists. One of the valuable elements of the neighborhoods that adjoin the open space in Greenwood Vil- lage are connections not only to the Highline Canal Trail but oth- ers in the area. You can walk out of your house or wheel your bike out of the garage and go to the trail- head without having to drive and park. There may be other times that your walking needs are more city- oriented, and those are the times that you want to be able to park your car and do a little shopping and then get on the light rail and get to work downtown, or to at- tend a sporting event or get to an- other cultural attraction. Why are these things impor- tant? According to Walkscore. com, one point of Walk Score can be worth up to $3,000 in value for your property—that’s nothing to take lightly when talking about the most significant investment most of us will ever make. And speak- ing of investments, walkability is an investment in your health, as well: the average resident of a walkable neighborhood weighs seven pounds less than someone who lives in a less walkable one. Curious about your own walk score? Enter your address into www.walkscore.com to find out how you rank. Knowing what goes into mak- ing a walkable community helps citizens advocate for improve- ments that preserve access while keeping the character of the area. Greenwood Village will always be a suburban community, but part of what makes it unique is the ability to summon either a rural character by walking a trail like the High- line, or to evoke the urban in its transit facilities and walkable con- nections to the core city. Jennifer Schaufele is the executive director of the Denver Regional Council of Governments and a Greenwood Village resident SUBMITTED BY BLUE IRIS LANDSCAPING Most of us that think of plant- ing in the fall only think of plant- ing spring flowering bulbs. But the truth is, it is a great time to plant perennials, trees, shrubs and Why? Fall is an ideal time for planting for the following reasons: In cooler temperatures, plants don’t need as much water and have less stress from transplanting. Cooler temps are also easier on the gardener. In the fall, soils tend to be just the right temperature that makes the roots more comfortable. In the fall, plants begin to go dor- mant. It’s during the fall that roots get a chance to absorb all of the nu- trients without needing to distribute them to the leaves and blooms. You can plant most plants through mid-October (depending on the weather). This will allow roots another two months to get es- tablished before winter. Established plants also have a better chance of making it through the heat of the next summer. Here are some ideas to incorpo- rate into your garden: Contrast Combine light colored leaves with dark colored leaves; coarse textures with fine, lacy textures for a dramatic and interesting look. Use grasses Use ornamental grasses like Miscanthus (maiden grass), Pen- nisetum (fountain grass), or Cala- magrostis (feather reed grass) to add texture, movement, height (in some cases), and color to your fall landscape. Fall color Choose shrubs like viburnum, burning bush, dogwoods, and ma- ples to add some red color to your fall landscape. Evergreens Evergreen trees such as spruce or pine and evergreen shrubs such as spruce, pine, juniper, and euonymus act as a backdrop to summer flowers and as an anchor in a winter land- scape. di g s Keys to a fabulous fall garden Use ornamental grasses to add texture, movement, height (in some cases) and color to your fall landscape. Photo courtesy of Blue Iris Landscaping GV, Highline Canal Trail offer residents quality, walkable lifestyle

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digs is a supplemental publication of The Villager Newspaper. Produced twice a month, this new section will feature stories about home improvement and décor, lawn/garden care and landscaping. Digs will also focus on real estate – supplying real estate agents and brokers with a platform to highlight their properties, expertise and services.

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  • PAGE 8 THE VILLAGER November 4, 2010

    Ali's Cleaning Service Residential & Commercial Window Cleaning Licensed & Insured CALL ... 720-300-6731OR EMAIL ... [email protected] Colocho, Manager

    www.a-teamelectronics.com | [email protected]

    a-teaminc.SUPER SIZE YOUR SECURITY SYSTEM Dont Just Detect Danger, Prevent It! Prevent Intrusion Prevent water and freeze damage Control Lighting Control Energy Instant Medical Response

    CUSTOM MEDIA ROOMS WATCH: Movies, Sports, Live Concerts PLAY: Video games LEARN: Languages, classes, interactive skills TRANSACT: Business, conferences, banking ENTERTAIN: Pictures, videos

    Contact us today.Brian Beck 303.570.1365

    Your Satisfaction is Our GoalFamily OwnedEstablished 1949

    2659W. MAIN ST.LITTLETON, CO 80120

    PHONE 303-795-1323FAX 795-1325

    www.UniqueLandscapesAndGardensInc.com

    UnIqUe LAndscApes & GArdens

    dream itIf you canwe can build it.

    303.274.0201

    digs

    By Jennifer SchaufeleDrcOG executive DirectOr

    W ere now at the sixth of the livable communi-ties principles that will conclude my discussion with you about the federal partnership for sustainable communities between the Environmental Protection Agency, Housing and Urban De-velopment office, and the Depart-ment of Transportation. Weve talked about choices in transporta-tion and housing, the importance of economic competitiveness, pre-serving community character, and leveraging partnerships. The last principle is the one that could be thought of as summing things up.

    Value communities and neighborhoods

    Enhance the unique character-istics of all communities by invest-ing in healthy, safe, and walkable neighborhoods rural, urban, or suburban.

    You might be thinking to your-self, how can a rural community be considered walkable? For that matter, what about my subur-ban home and how can that be considered on the same level as somebody who lives in downtown Denver?

    Maybe we need to start by talk-ing about why a walkable com-munity is important, and where and why were walking. Walkable neighborhoods are those with con-nections -- connections to trails

    and connections to services. Thats how a walkable neighborhood can look different depending on where you are. You could be walking be-tween different shops, restaurants and other places that provide ser-vices you need in an urban area; you could be walking to visit with friends or take your kids to school, or you could be walking to enjoy the outdoors and promote your health. Different uses may require sidewalks, they may require well-maintained trails, and in a truly walkable environment you can get from one to the other without stretches between where access on foot is difficult. Here in Green-wood Village, we have elements of rural, suburban and urban envi-ronments.

    Recreational walkers who en-joy the Marjorie Perry open space can connect with a network of communities by way of the High-line Canal Trail. That trail runs 66 miles through three counties. Its one of the most popular rec-reational trails in greater Denver area, and accommodates not only walkers, but runners and cyclists.

    One of the valuable elements of the neighborhoods that adjoin the open space in Greenwood Vil-lage are connections not only to the Highline Canal Trail but oth-ers in the area. You can walk out of your house or wheel your bike out of the garage and go to the trail-head without having to drive and park.

    There may be other times that your walking needs are more city-oriented, and those are the times that you want to be able to park your car and do a little shopping and then get on the light rail and get to work downtown, or to at-tend a sporting event or get to an-other cultural attraction.

    Why are these things impor-tant? According to Walkscore.com, one point of Walk Score can be worth up to $3,000 in value for your propertythats nothing to take lightly when talking about the most significant investment most of us will ever make. And speak-ing of investments, walkability is an investment in your health, as well: the average resident of a walkable neighborhood weighs seven pounds less than someone who lives in a less walkable one. Curious about your own walk score? Enter your address into www.walkscore.com to find out how you rank.

    Knowing what goes into mak-ing a walkable community helps citizens advocate for improve-ments that preserve access while keeping the character of the area. Greenwood Village will always be a suburban community, but part of what makes it unique is the ability to summon either a rural character by walking a trail like the High-line, or to evoke the urban in its transit facilities and walkable con-nections to the core city.

    Jennifer Schaufele is the executive director of the Denver Regional Council of Governments and a Greenwood Village resident

    SuBmitteD By Blue iriS lanDScapinGMost of us that think of plant-

    ing in the fall only think of plant-ing spring flowering bulbs. But the truth is, it is a great time to plant perennials, trees, shrubs and Why?

    Fall is an ideal time for planting for the following reasons:

    In cooler temperatures, plants dont need as much water and have less stress from transplanting. Cooler temps are also easier on the gardener.

    In the fall, soils tend to be just the right temperature that makes the roots more comfortable.

    In the fall, plants begin to go dor-mant. Its during the fall that roots get a chance to absorb all of the nu-trients without needing to distribute

    them to the leaves and blooms.You can plant most plants

    through mid-October (depending on the weather). This will allow roots another two months to get es-tablished before winter. Established plants also have a better chance of making it through the heat of the next summer.

    Here are some ideas to incorpo-rate into your garden:Contrast

    Combine light colored leaves with dark colored leaves; coarse textures with fine, lacy textures for a dramatic and interesting look.Use grasses

    Use ornamental grasses like

    Miscanthus (maiden grass), Pen-nisetum (fountain grass), or Cala-magrostis (feather reed grass) to add texture, movement, height (in some cases), and color to your fall landscape.Fall color

    Choose shrubs like viburnum, burning bush, dogwoods, and ma-ples to add some red color to your fall landscape.Evergreens

    Evergreen trees such as spruce or pine and evergreen shrubs such as spruce, pine, juniper, and euonymus act as a backdrop to summer flowers and as an anchor in a winter land-scape.

    digsKeys to a fabulous

    fall garden

    Use ornamental grasses to add texture, movement, height (in some cases) and color to your fall landscape. Photo courtesy of Blue Iris Landscaping

    GV, Highline Canal Trail offer residents quality, walkable lifestyle

  • November 4, 2010 THE VILLAGER PAGE 9

    Green AdvAntAGe Certified

    full ServiCe reSidentiAl remodelinG

    & deSiGn

    With a Personal Touch & Quality You Can Trust

    Since 19922003, 2007 & 2009 CARE Award Winner

    303-783-3707www.HusekRemodeling.com

    By H. THroTTleClassic cars are coming back; I

    would describe this new Canadian made Chrysler 300C sports model as a classic. It has the appear-ance of a Bentley, large front grill, large front bumper, an intimidating appearance, somewhat regal in a masculine way.

    This is a hot car, in appear-ance and performance, Chrysler is somewhat of a mystery these past few months having been sold by Daimler/Bentz to a Ca-nadian group who have appar-ently put their hearts into im-proving the impressive old line standards of Chrysler and Jeep, two American icon brands.

    Americans and Canadians have a inherent love affair. Its unfortu-

    nate back in the last century that Canada didnt become part of the United States, It was talked about as recent as 1895 but the concept never bore fruit; what a splendid marriage that would have been.

    The Chrysler 300C sports edi-tion has a 6.l L V-8 engine that has enough power to rocket this car to the moon. The car just explodes with power when accelerated and this wonderful hemi engine goes to work. Coupled to a six-speed trans-mission this is not grandmothers Chrysler but could easily be the next pace car at the Indy 500.

    This is not the car for an eco-nomically minded, guzzle pinching consumer. The huge V8 produces a flimsy 13-mpg around town and 19 if allowed to idle down the high-

    way at speed limits. Appearance is classic, every

    bell and whistle, with red crys-tal pearl paint and leather interior this is a beautiful product priced at $49,195. Buyers pay a gas-guzzler tax of $1,700.

    The 300C is assembled in On-tario, transmission manufactured in US and Hemi engine in Mexi-co. The world is certainly getting smaller.

    One might guess that since were close to years end that these special Hemi powered Chryslers might be on sale and they are a very special product for a driver who likes power, size, comfort, and safety, almost perfect safety ratings on this beautiful beast of the realm.

    The Chrysler 300C is a beautiful product with a price tag of $49,195.

    Chrysler 300C sports sedan is classic muscle car

    Infinity G37 Coupe is engineering masterpieceBy H. THroTTle

    Its sleek and silver with liquid platinum paint and graphite leather interior. The appearance is just the icing on the cake; this 2010 Infinity G37 coupe is the real deal for the right car enthusiast. Drivers who like maneuverability, speed, ease of driving and performance this is a great vehicle.

    The flexible 7-speed transmis-sion is a perfect match-up with the 330 hp V-6 engine. Together the coupe delivers 25-mpg mileage but with careful driving techniques can go much higher.

    The G37 is in a class with far more expensive sports cars but for much less money. The G37 loaded with sound and navigation packages is listed at $46,914, but more than $7,000 is extra equip-ment. In many ways performance is what this coupe is all about, not extra bells and whistles, maybe too many with many buttons and con-

    trols on the center console. Manu-facturers should consider implying the electronics, too many, too com-plicated.

    A car designed for a driver who likes performance, the trans-mission is a dream to shift for high speed or mountain driving and is all-wheel-drive for winter highways. The car has sports car muscle and precise handling, great braking system, a treat to drive on

    a freeway or in traffic.A two-door, the rear seat is tight,

    barely large enough to seat a pas-senger, not a family sedan in most respects.

    Infinity does a great job in all of their models; the G37 is just a masterpiece of manufacturing and rivals all high performance cars tested at a moderate price level.

    Good as it gets for this sports car field.

    Quality and Precision

    The 2010 Infinity G37 coupe loaded package is listed at $46,914.

    Photo by H. Throttle

    By H. THroTTleAmerican car buyers are now

    starting to benefit from the mul-tiple vehicles being manufac-tured in the USA and abroad. This competition is fierce and no contender is working harder than Toyota to overcome short-comings and recalls. It appears that they have become a better, more competitive company.

    The new 2010 Toyota Corol-la has all of the engineered spe-cial features like keyless entry, heated rear view mirrors, and even Macpherson front struts, the best money can buy. These are just a few of the special features on a new Corolla that has a suggested retail price of $16,750.

    The car is peppy, powered by

    a 1.8L four cylinder engine that is miserly on fuel and produces an attractive 34-mpg on Colorado highways even with an automatic transmission.

    Safety rating on side crashes is a perfect five score, four on fron-tal and rollover, good scores for an economy vehicle.

    The new Corolla is a great commuter, high gas mileage, good safety, halogen headlights, front wheel drive with traction control, frontal ventilated disk brakes, this is a car that will last forever and has many old ances-tors on city streets.

    This is sound economical transportation and attractively priced for a four-passenger sedan loaded with bells and whistles and solid performance.

    2010 Toyota Corolla is solid buy for the buck

    The Toyota Corolla has a suggested retail price of $16,750.Photo by H. Throttle

    digs

    VIL_11-4-10_P8_KVIL_11-4-10_P9_K