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  • NATA Safety 1st eToolkit Volume I, Issue 5 December 16, 2004 Page 1

    The NATA Safety 1st Management System Initiative is now fully operational. Manyof the tools discussed in this and other eToolkits will be provided as a part of the program.

    In This Edition: Safety Case Study

    Top 10 Aviation Comp Claims.........................1 How Secure Are Your Hangar Doors?. ...........6 Industry Alert ...................................................6 Deicing Safety Guidelines ...............................7 Continuing Education ......................................8

    Aircraft

    Equipment

    Personnel

    Environment

    Aircraft

    Equipment

    Personnel

    Environment

    Welcome to the fifth issue of the NATA Safety 1st eToolkit, our monthly online safety newsletter, supporting the NATA Safety 1st Management System (SMS) Initiative.

    This monthly newsletter will highlight known and emerging trends, environ-mental and geographical matters as well as advances in operational efficiency and safety. Flight and ground safety has been enhanced and many accidents prevented because of shared experiences.

    The NATA Safety 1st Management System (SMS) app-lication process is well underway. NATA Safety 1st and SH&E would like to welcome our new SMS members for the month of December.

    And how to prevent them from happening at your operation

    For the past four months we have focused on the prevention of ground damage to aircraft and vehicular equipment. Like any good safety program, we want to always focus on the human element that is the interplay between man (your personnel) and machine within the operating environment. Even when we are addressing such topics as vehicle to aircraft approach procedures or methods to properly hangar aircraft, we build on the fact that everything that happens is precipitated by human action. It all begins with the human touch.

    Focusing on the prevention of bent metal and bruised customer relations is a large part of what we have been addressing within the pages of the first few eToolkits, but we also want to focus on what matters most and that is - the health and well-being of your employees.

    Volume I, Issue 5 December 16, 2004

    New SMS Participants

    Company Name City State

    Frederick Aviation Frederick MD

    Abilene Aero Abilene TX

    Central Flying Service Sherwood AR

    Lane Aviation, Inc. Columbus OH

    Robinson Aviation East Haven CT

    Tac Air Texarkana TX

    Texas Jet Inc. Ft. Worth TX

    Wings of Wenatchee East Wenatchee WA

    New SMS Participants

    Company Name City State

    Frederick Aviation Frederick MD

    Abilene Aero Abilene TX

    Central Flying Service Sherwood AR

    Lane Aviation, Inc. Columbus OH

    Robinson Aviation East Haven CT

    Tac Air Texarkana TX

    Texas Jet Inc. Ft. Worth TX

    Wings of Wenatchee East Wenatchee WA

  • NATA Safety 1st eToolkit Volume I, Issue 5 December 16, 2004 Page 2

    As enlightened managers and supervisors know full well, a well-motivated core team of employees can do more to advance an effective safety culture than a catchy mission statement or safety slogan. Making the most of your safety program begins with the way in which you define your business goals. Reasonable and achievable are often best, but when you have to change the industry, and some feel they must, goals can become loftier. Theres nothing wrong with that and, to those that endeavor to bring positive change, we salute you. However, with the goal setting comes a responsibility to provide the resources to allow your team to achieve and exceed your goals. From there, and this becomes apparent quite rapidly, comes the question of how you encourage that achievement of those goals. Words are often viewed as cheap, but actions, and in this case, by providing the necessary tools of the trade, speaks volumes about your commitment to your employees future and the success of your organization.

    Respecting employees health and well-being is a sign of a well managed business. Several business managers have reached out to the industry and to our government for additional guidance, and in some cases, free (kind of) advice.

    In the case of preventing employee injuries or injuries to personnel at your location, we can point you in the right direction if you havent taken advantage of these opportunities as of yet. Here are some helpful suggestions:

    First and foremost, take advantage of what you are paying for already. Usually within your workers compensation insurance program is the provision of loss control services. Many of todays top flight insurers provide very effective loss control for specific issues like Hearing Conservation, Ergonomics, Air Sampling and so on. The best bet is to contact your Insurance Broker or your Carrier and ask them what is provided in the program. You may be surprised that you have not taken advantage of some exceptional guidance.

    Next, turn to your Broker, in many cases, your Insurance Broker provides or makes provision for loss control and safety services. Check with your broker to see what they offer.

    From there, your good friends at NATA provide a wealth of services and can provide, at a nominal fee, on site safety services or telephonic consultation. We can also analyze your Workers Compensation Loss Runs and provide you with a management report and recommendations to better manage your Workers Compensation Program. These services are being offered though our Safety First Management System initiative. For those interested, contact Amy Koranda for more information.

    Our government offers services as well, within the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) are a variety of programs designed to help businesses address common to complex safety and employee health issues. For those of you who conduct operations in a state that has adopted a more stringent occupational safety program, refer to your states administrator for similar programs.

    Here are some of the available government sponsored tools, often at no cost other than your time:

    The OSHA Outreach Training Program is our primary way to train workers in the basics of

    occupational safety and health. Through the program, individuals who complete a one-week OSHA trainer course are authorized to teach 10-hour or 30-hour courses in construction or general industry safety and health standards. Authorized trainers can receive OSHA course completion cards for their students. Over the past four years, over one million students have received training through this program.

    OSHA's Small Business Outreach Training Program provides basic information about selected topics in occupational safety and health. This guide is designed to provide ideas and organizational assistance to an instructor who wishes to present these topics, which specifically focus on the needs of small business.

    mailto:[email protected]

  • NATA Safety 1st eToolkit Volume I, Issue 5 December 16, 2004 Page 3

    The topic discussions are available in both HTML and PDF formats. Overhead masters for presenting the topic and student handouts are available in PDF format.

    The HTML format allows you to immediately view the materials in an unformatted version to get a sense of the section contents. The PDF format allows you to view and print formatted copies of topic discussions, overhead masters, and student handouts.

    To access this program and all of the materials go to:

    http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/smallbusiness/index.html

    This course is a great way to encourage employee awareness and will be offered by NATA in 2005 as SH&E and its safety experts have the ability to conduct these training courses which become a train the trainer credential.

    Also important here is that NATA and SH&E have fine-tuned the course curriculum to address aviation exposures and applying OSHA to your operation.

    To access this program and all of the materials go to:

    http://www.osha.gov/fso/ote/training/outreach/training_program.html - aids

    OSHAs Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP) promote effective worksite-based safety and health. In the VPP, management, labor, and OSHA

    establish cooperative relationships at workplaces that have implemented a comprehensive safety and health management system. Approval into VPP is OSHAs official recognition of the outstanding efforts of employers and employees who have achieved exemplary occupational safety and health.

    For government statistics on occupational injures and commonly cited violations, the folks at the US Census Bureau compile a vast array of indices about US industry.

    Remember your SIC (thats Standard Industrial classification) Code from our good friends at the US Census Bureau, Well, they have changed to The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) which has replaced the U.S. Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS was designed to reshape the way we view our changing economy.

    NAICS was developed jointly by the U.S., Canada, and Mexico to provide new comparability in statistics about business activity across North America.

    For most of us in the aviation business, FBO and ground services were classified under the SIC code 4581 Airports, Flying Fields, And Airport Terminal Services. Now, under NAICS, this is code 488119 Other Airport Operations.

    This new classification addresses business within the U.S. and comprises establishments primarily engaged in (1) operating international, national, or civil airports, or public flying fields or (2) supporting airport operations, such as rental of hangar space, and providing baggage handling and/or cargo handling services. There are other SIC codes for the Aviation industry such as 4512 for Scheduled Air Transportation; 4522 for Non Scheduled Air Transportation and 4513 for Air couriers.

    For more information on the North American Industry Classification System go to:

    http://www.census.gov/epcd/www/naics.html

    http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/smallbusiness/index.htmlhttp://www.osha.gov/fso/ote/training/outreach/training_program.htmlhttp://www.census.gov/epcd/www/naics.html

  • NATA Safety 1st eToolkit Volume I, Issue 5 December 16, 2004 Page 4

    Listed to the right are the standardswhich were cited by Federal OSHAfor the specified SIC (Aviation AllCategories) during the periodOctober 2003 through September2004. Penalties shown reflect currentrather than initial amounts. TheStandards refer to the Code ofFederal Regulations (CFR) forOccupational Safety and HealthStandards for General Industry 1910For the Full listing of OSHARegulations, go to:

    http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=9696

    The table provides a tabulation of thecommonly cited OSHA violationsand the dollar amount of the fines orpenalties levied on business. Ofcourse, the penalties are notnecessarily final and can be mitigatedor reduced.

    Standard #Cited #Insp $Penalty Description

    Total 293 84 16319219100134 27 11 3292 Respiratory Protection19101052 25 5 10005 Medical First Aid19100178 21 14 27579 Powered Industrial Trucks19101200 20 11 2438 Hazard Communication19100305 16 10 8187 Electrical, Wiring Methods, 19100037 12 9 3000 Means of Egress, General19100303 11 8 4345 Electrical Systems Design, General 19100212 10 9 12935 Machines, General Requirements19100215 10 8 3498 Abrasive Wheel Machinery19100147 8 4 2725 The Control of Hazardous Energy, 5A0001 8 6 2205019100095 7 1 2362 Occupational Noise Exposure19100151 7 7 3210 Medical Services and First Aid19100157 7 7 2538 Portable Fire Extinguishers19101030 7 5 975 Bloodborne Pathogens19100023 6 5 6190 Guarding Floor and Wall Openings and 19100141 6 4 4600 Sanitation19100146 5 4 525 Permit-Required Confined Spaces19100304 5 5 3450 Electrical, Wiring Design and 19100022 4 4 1800 Walking-Working Surfaces, General 19100029 4 3 3772 Manually Propelled Mobile Ladder 19100036 4 3 1600 Means of Egress, General 19100107 4 1 975 Spray Finishing with 19100179 4 2 2325 Overhead and Gantry Cranes19100184 4 2 825 Slings19100133 3 3 820 Eye and Face Protection19100219 3 3 2220 Mechanical Power-Transmission 19100253 3 3 515 Oxygen-Fuel Gas Welding and Cutting19040002 2 2 675 Log and Summary of Occupational 19040029 2 2 80019040040 2 2 11319100024 2 2 737 Fixed Industrial Stairs19100026 2 1 495 Portable Metal Ladders19100038 2 2 0 Employee Emergency Plans and Fire 19100106 2 2 640 Flammable and Combustible Liquids19100120 2 1 1125 Hazardous Waste Operations and 19100176 2 2 2250 Materials Handling, General19100242 2 2 315 Hand and Portable Powered Tools and 19101001 2 1 1500 Asbestos Tremolite, Anthophyllite and 19101025 2 2 1125 Lead19040004 1 1 638 Supplementary Record19040005 1 1 1000 Annual Summary, Occupational 19040008 1 1 0 Fatality/Multiple Hospitalization 19040030 1 1 0 Other Working Surfaces19040032 1 1 0 Other19040041 1 1 500 Other19100132 1 1 4500 Personal Protective 19100135 1 1 495 Occupational Head Protection19100136 1 1 0 Occupational Foot Protection19100145 1 1 0 Specifications, Accident Prevention 19100169 1 1 495 Compressed Air Receivers19100243 1 1 660 Guarding of Portable Powered Tools19100334 1 1 0 Electrical, Use of Equipment19260453 1 1 938 Manually Propelled Mobile Ladder 19260454 1 1 938 Other

    Standard #Cited #Insp $Penalty Description

    Total 293 84 16319219100134 27 11 3292 Respiratory Protection19101052 25 5 10005 Medical First Aid19100178 21 14 27579 Powered Industrial Trucks19101200 20 11 2438 Hazard Communication19100305 16 10 8187 Electrical, Wiring Methods, 19100037 12 9 3000 Means of Egress, General19100303 11 8 4345 Electrical Systems Design, General 19100212 10 9 12935 Machines, General Requirements19100215 10 8 3498 Abrasive Wheel Machinery19100147 8 4 2725 The Control of Hazardous Energy, 5A0001 8 6 2205019100095 7 1 2362 Occupational Noise Exposure19100151 7 7 3210 Medical Services and First Aid19100157 7 7 2538 Portable Fire Extinguishers19101030 7 5 975 Bloodborne Pathogens19100023 6 5 6190 Guarding Floor and Wall Openings and 19100141 6 4 4600 Sanitation19100146 5 4 525 Permit-Required Confined Spaces19100304 5 5 3450 Electrical, Wiring Design and 19100022 4 4 1800 Walking-Working Surfaces, General 19100029 4 3 3772 Manually Propelled Mobile Ladder 19100036 4 3 1600 Means of Egress, General 19100107 4 1 975 Spray Finishing with 19100179 4 2 2325 Overhead and Gantry Cranes19100184 4 2 825 Slings19100133 3 3 820 Eye and Face Protection19100219 3 3 2220 Mechanical Power-Transmission 19100253 3 3 515 Oxygen-Fuel Gas Welding and Cutting19040002 2 2 675 Log and Summary of Occupational 19040029 2 2 80019040040 2 2 11319100024 2 2 737 Fixed Industrial Stairs19100026 2 1 495 Portable Metal Ladders19100038 2 2 0 Employee Emergency Plans and Fire 19100106 2 2 640 Flammable and Combustible Liquids19100120 2 1 1125 Hazardous Waste Operations and 19100176 2 2 2250 Materials Handling, General19100242 2 2 315 Hand and Portable Powered Tools and 19101001 2 1 1500 Asbestos Tremolite, Anthophyllite and 19101025 2 2 1125 Lead19040004 1 1 638 Supplementary Record19040005 1 1 1000 Annual Summary, Occupational 19040008 1 1 0 Fatality/Multiple Hospitalization 19040030 1 1 0 Other Working Surfaces19040032 1 1 0 Other19040041 1 1 500 Other19100132 1 1 4500 Personal Protective 19100135 1 1 495 Occupational Head Protection19100136 1 1 0 Occupational Foot Protection19100145 1 1 0 Specifications, Accident Prevention 19100169 1 1 495 Compressed Air Receivers19100243 1 1 660 Guarding of Portable Powered Tools19100334 1 1 0 Electrical, Use of Equipment19260453 1 1 938 Manually Propelled Mobile Ladder 19260454 1 1 938 Other

    http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=9696

  • NATA Safety 1st eToolkit Volume I, Issue 5 December 16, 2004 Page 5

    OSHAs Top Ten Standard Citations NATAs Top Ten Employee Injury Events

    1 Respiratory Protection 1 Back Injuries Lifting

    2 Medical First Aid 2 Hand Injuries Cuts

    3 Powered Industrial Trucks 3 Falls from Ladders

    4 Hazard Communication 4 Slips Groin Injuries

    5 Electrical, Wiring Methods, Components and Equipment

    5 Ankle Sprains

    6 Means of Egress, General 6 Multiple from Mobile Equipment Accidents

    7 Electrical Systems Design, General Requirements

    7 Eye Injuries Fuel or Debris

    8 Machines, General Requirements 8 Head Strikes & Bumps

    9 Abrasive Wheel Machinery 9 Hearing Degradation

    10 The Control of Hazardous Energy, Lockout/Tagout

    10 Respiratory Discomfort

    OSHAs Top Ten Standard Citations NATAs Top Ten Employee Injury Events

    1 Respiratory Protection 1 Back Injuries Lifting

    2 Medical First Aid 2 Hand Injuries Cuts

    3 Powered Industrial Trucks 3 Falls from Ladders

    4 Hazard Communication 4 Slips Groin Injuries

    5 Electrical, Wiring Methods, Components and Equipment

    5 Ankle Sprains

    6 Means of Egress, General 6 Multiple from Mobile Equipment Accidents

    7 Electrical Systems Design, General Requirements

    7 Eye Injuries Fuel or Debris

    8 Machines, General Requirements 8 Head Strikes & Bumps

    9 Abrasive Wheel Machinery 9 Hearing Degradation

    10 The Control of Hazardous Energy, Lockout/Tagout

    10 Respiratory Discomfort

    One thing is for sure, when management does a poor job of managing, that is being visible and providing clear,consistent guidance and oversight things can get out of hand rather quickly. Walking the floor, driving the ramp andjust plain looking around will open your eyes to the many short cuts we have allowed our employees to take because wewerent as clear as we should have been.

    Every employee and customer should come to your operation with the belief you are looking out for them. To do so,you must be aware of the requirements and must apply them completely and consistently.

    Many thanks to Michael Clark, VP of Phoenix Aviation Manager's Workers' Compensation Division for providingtheir assessment of the common claims within the non-flight employee ranks.

  • NATA Safety 1st eToolkit Volume I, Issue 5 December 16, 2004 Page 6

    How Secure Are Your Hangar Doors? In the October issue of NATA Safety 1st eToolkit, the safety alert contained a high winds plan shared by reader, John Hatten of Delta Global Services. Since that issue, we have received additional tips on securing

    hangar doors. We would like to thank Marshall Dean, U. S. Aviation Underwriters, for sharing pictures of damages sustained by aircraft parked in hangars due to fallen

    hangar doors. (Please note these pictures were NOT of Steve Smalleys aircraft due to the precautions we will share with you below.)

    We would also like to thank Steve Smalley for sharing his creative idea on securing hangar doors in hopes that this will assist you the next time you encounter abnormally high winds.

    Steve Smalley is in the salvaging business, Air & Sea Crash Recovery in Ft. Lauderdale, and is no stranger to the damages caused by hurricanes and tropical storms over the past 15 years spent in Florida. Steve keeps his aircraft in a 10,000 square foot hanger with four 28-foot sliding doors. Having seen too many aircraft destroyed by hangar doors, he decided he wasnt going to stand by and watch the same thing happen to his aircraft.

    In order to prepare for this years hurricane season, Steve contacted the local welding shop to have brackets made to bolt down the bottom of the hangar doors. He then drilled holes into the concrete and secured the doors shut with inch bolts. He also chained the top rails of the hangar doors to prevent them from blowing off the tracks.

    What kind of damage was sustained after securing the top and bottom of the hangar doors? Steve reported that 25% of the hangar roof panels blew off, but the doors remained in place in winds nearing 100 mph. He compared this to a nearby, 14,000 square foot, four- year old building, blown down during the same winds. One can only imaginewhat if.

    What were the costs for securing the hangar doors? Steve indicated this retrofit cost approximately $150 - $200. This small expenditure may have saved Steves aircraft. Again, we extend our thanks to Steve for sharing this story. He has been working non-stop since the hurricanes ravaged their way through the Caribbean and southern states.

    What about the rest of you? What precautions has your operation taken to weather the storms? While hurricane season is over, those of us in the north are just entering the powerful ice, wind and snow storm season. Hangar doors are challenging, but if you pass along your preparation strategies, we can all benefit. Please email your stories to Amy Koranda. We will share pertinent information with you in upcoming eToolkit issues. Thanks for staying in touch!

    INDUSTRY ALERT: Over the past four weeks, our industry has been rocked byfive significant aircraft accidents, with several involving thetragic and unfortunate loss of precious life. In three of thefive cases, the accidents occurred during the approach andlanding phase. Two accidents occurred during or shortlyafter the departure phase. Of the five aircraft, 7 lives werelost, significant injuries and $47M in hull losses sustained.

    Flight Safety Foundation Approach and Landing AccidentReduction (ALAR) task force produced a CD that includes awealth of information on methods to identify the hazards andmitigate the risk. For your copy of the ALAR Toolkit, pleasevisit Flight Safety Foundation to order your ALAR CD at:http://www.flightsafety.org/ecommerce

    http://www.nata-online.org/8MemServ/Safety1st/PDF/Safety_1st_eToolkit%20_Oct04_Issue_3.pdfmailto:[email protected]://www.flightsafety.org/ecommerce

  • NATA Safety 1st eToolkit Volume I, Issue 5 December 16, 2004 Page 7

    Deicing Safety Guidelines

  • NATA Safety 1st eToolkit Volume I, Issue 5 December 16, 2004 Page 8

    Information on NATA Safety 1st Training

    Online: http://www.nata.aero/events/index.html Phone: (703) 845-9000, ext 127 Fax: (703) 845-8176 Mail: NATA 4226 King Street Alexandria, VA 22302

    We have provided an application in our eToolkit for the SMS. Don't delay! Start

    taking safety at your facility to the next level.

    CONTINUING EDUCATION Through continuing education, you and your team can enhance the professional skills needed to maximize personal and professional contributions to the day-to-day efficiency of your operation. We will provide learning opportunities in each monthly issue that may be of interest to you and your team.

    General Education Offerings:

    Aircraft De/Anti-Icing Training NATA Safety 1st in partnership with Leading Edge Website: http://www.nata.aero/events/index.html (click Online Training) Phone: 703/845-9000, ext. 127 Business Aircraft Deicing Guide NATA Safety 1st in partnership with Leading Edge Website: http://www.nata.aero/publications/index.html Phone: 703/845-9000, ext. 127 Line Service Supervisor Seminar Website: http://www.nata.aero/events/index.html Phone: 703/845-9000, ext 106 Aviation Safety and Security Offerings:

    Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Universitys Center for Aerospace Safety/Security Education (CASE) Website: http://www.avsaf.org/case/programs_events.html

    Phone: 386/226-6928 Email: [email protected]

    Southern California Safety Institute Website: http://www.scsi-inc.com/

    Phone: 310/517-8844 ext. 5

    Transportation Safety Institute Website: http://www.tsi.dot.gov/divisions/Aviation/aviation.htm

    Phone: 405/954-3614

    University of Southern California 2005 Aviation Safety Course Schedule Website: http://viterbi.usc.edu/pdfs/unstructured/aviation/ Course_Schedule.htm Phone: 310/342-1345

    The NATA Safety 1st eToolkit is brought to you by NATA Safety 1st SMS and SH&E. SH&E is the leading expert in safety and

    operational integrity evaluations and safety management consulting. SH&E has developed a proprietary evaluation methodology, called Safety Architecture, which is unique within the industry as it focuses on systemic surveillance and process evaluation. This is a systems and controls look at how an operator manages

    those technical functions that support aviation operations.

    Subscribe To NATA Safety 1st e Toolkit

    If you are not currently a subscriber to NATA Safety 1st eToolkit and would like to receive it on a regular basis, please send an email to [email protected] with the word "Subscribe" in the header. Please include your name, title, company and e-mail address. Safety 1st eToolkit is distributed free of charge to NATA member companies and NATA Safety 1st participants.

    http://www.nata.aero/events/index.html http://www.nata.aero/publications/index.htmlhttp://www.nata.aero/events/index.htmlhttp://www.avsaf.org/case/programs_events.htmlhttp://www.scsi-inc.com/http://www.nata.aero/events/index.html http://www.tsi.dot.gov/divisions/Aviation/aviation.htmhttp://viterbi.usc.edu/pdfs/unstructured/aviation/mailto:[email protected]

  • Safety Case Study - Top 10 Aviation Comp ClaimsHow Secure Are Your Hangar Doors?Industry AlertDeicing Safety GuidelinesContinuing EducationSMS Order Form