dr. william allan kritsonis, dissertation chair - proposal, clarence johnson

Download Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair - Proposal, Clarence Johnson

Post on 03-Nov-2014

10 views

Category:

Education

5 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair - Proposal, Clarence Johnson

TRANSCRIPT

  • 1. IMPACT OF HIGH SCHOOL MATHEMATICS CURRICULA ONTHE MATHEMATICS TAKS EXIT-LEVEL PERFORMANCE OF AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDENTS Presented ByClarence Johnson September, 2007 Dissertation Chair: William Allan Kritsonis,PhD Dissertation Proposal Defense

2. Committee Members

  • William A. Kritsonis, Ph.D.
  • (Dissertation Chair)
  • Douglas Hermond, Ph.D.
  • (Member)
  • David Herrington, Ph.D.
  • (Member)
  • Pamela Barber-Freeman, Ph.D.
  • (Member)
  • Veda Brown, Ph.D.
  • (Outside Member)

3. Proposal Defense Outline

  • The Problem
  • Purpose of Study
  • Research Questions
  • Hypotheses
  • Importance of Study
  • Review of Literature
  • Research Design

4. The Problem

  • In the United States, remedial mathematics classrooms contain large number of African American students; however, advanced mathematics classes mainly served White students (Snipes & Waters, 2005).
  • Luebienski (2001) reported that, in both 1990 and 1996, White students in the lowest socioeconomic subgroup scored equal to or higher than African American students in the highest socioeconomic subgroup.

5. The Problem

  • In a summary of four national surveys reported between 1969 and 1987, Horn (1990) found that Asians earned twice the number of mathematics and science credits than did Whites, and Whites earned twice the number of credits for those subjects than did African Americans or Hispanics.

6. The Problem

  • Forty-three percent of African American high school students failed the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Exit-Level Mathematics Test in 2005. Current documentation indicates the failure rate is higher among African American students than any other ethnic groups (TEA Accountability System State Data Table, 2005).

7. New Jersey Mathematics Curriculum Framework High Expectations in Mathematics for All Students The Significance of Mathematics Core Curriculum Content Standards Identifying Equity Concerns in Districts and Schools Challenging All Students to Maximize Their Achievement Overcoming Barriers to Equity 8. New Jersey Mathematics Curriculum Framework Investigate Core Curriculum Content Standards Investigate High Expectations in Mathematics for All Students Identify 6 High Schools Mathematics TAKS Exit-Level Passing and Failure Rates of African American Students Survey 27 Counselors for Mathematics Placement of 8 thand 9 thGrades African American Students 9. Purpose of the Study

  • Investigate the relationship of high school mathematics curricula on the mathematics TAKS Exit-Level performance of African American students using the New Jersey Mathematics Curriculum Framework.

10. Purpose of the Study

  • Investigate high expectations in mathematics for all students using the New Jersey Mathematics Curriculum Framework.

11. Research Questions

  • Quantitative
  • 1. What is the impact of the decision of African American students to enroll in track one or track two in the eighth and ninth grades mathematics and the pass/fail status on the eleventh grade Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Exit-Level Mathematics Test?

12. Research Questions

  • Quantitative
  • 2. What is the impact of African American eighth and ninth grade mathematics students pass/fail status on the eleventh grade Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Exit-Level Mathematics Test among six high school campuses within a large urban school district?

13. Research Questions

  • Quantitative
  • 3. What is the impact of African American eighth and ninth grade students enrolled in track 1 or track 2 mathematics and advancing in mathematics learning by entering in chemistry, physics, pre-calculus, AP Physics, or AP Calculus in the eleventh and twelfth grades?

14. Research Questions

  • Quantitative
  • 4. What factors do counselors identify as influential on African American students placement in track 1 or track 2 in eighth and ninth grades mathematics?

15. Hypotheses

  • Ho 1 There is no statistically significant relationship between the decision to enroll in track 1 or track 2 in the eighth and ninth grades mathematics and pass/fail status of African American students on the eleventh grade Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Exit-Level Mathematics Test.

16. Hypotheses

  • Ho 2 There is no statistically significant relationship between African American eighth and ninth grades mathematics students pass/fail status on the eleventh grade Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Exit-Level Mathematics Test among six high school campuses within a large urban school district .

17.Hypotheses

  • Ho 3 There is no statistically significant relationship between the African American eighth and ninth grade students enrolled in track 1 or track 2 mathematics and advancing in mathematics learning by entering in chemistry, physics, pre-calculus, AP Physics, or AP Calculus in the eleventh and twelfth grades.

18. Importance of Study

  • Results of the study could provide a learning foundation for educational leadership in areas where the increased success of African American students on the mathematics exit-level tests has been identified.

19. Review of Literature

  • No Child Left Behind
  • On January 8, 2002, President Bush signed the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) into law to begin educational reform designed to improve student achievement and change American school culture (Jones & Hancock, 2005).

20. Review of Literature

  • Eighth-Grade Mathematics as the Gate-keeper to Advanced Mathematics Learning
  • In 1996, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) revealed that for Grade 4, 8, and 12, less than one third of U.S. students were proficient or above in mathematics and science (Glenn, 2000).

21. Review of Literature

  • African American Students in Advanced Mathematics Courses
  • Unfortunately, African American students in education today often experience a low-level, watered-down curriculum, negative perceptions about their ability, and low expectations regarding their achievement (Russell, 2005).

22. Review of Literature

  • Middle School Course Selection Patterns
  • In their analysis of American students achievement in the Third International Mathematics and Science Study, William Schmidt and his colleagues (1999) noticed how tracking creates differences in students opportunities to study mathematics and how reduced opportunities result in lower achievement.

23. Review of Literature

  • Disparities in Mathematics Achievement and Instruction
  • National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) data suggest that most African American students are not experiencing instructional practices consistent with the recommendations suggested by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), whereas more white students are experiencing NCTM standards-based instruction (Lubienski, 2001).

24. Review of Literature

  • Minority Gap in Mathematics
  • According to a 2004 report from the California Teacher Association (CTA), the widening achievement gap in Californias public schools raises many questions about educational equality.
  • The report further indicated that in 1990, there was a 33 point gap between the scores of Black and White students on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NEAP) mathematics test at the eighth grade level as compared to 2000 scores, the gap had grown to a 39 point gap.

25. Review of Literature

  • Impact of the Mathematics Curricula on the Success of African American Students
  • As Warren Simmons of the Casey Foundation observed, the nation entered the 1990s with twin goals for education reform. One of the goals was to create curricula and instructional approaches that would help all students attain world-class levels of achievement (Futrell & Brown, 2000).

26. Research Design

  • The research design for this study is in two phases. Phase one is a correlational study based on post hoc data. The Pearsons r statistic will be used to determine whether various factors are related to academic success in mathematics as measured by the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills Exit-Level Mathematics Test. Phase two is a survey of 27 counselors to determine factors for mathematics placement of African American students in the eighth and ninth grade. These data will be reported as descriptive data.

27. Subjects of the Study

  • Participants for the study will include 262 African American eleventh grade students and 27 eighth grade counselors. The students will be identified from the population of 827 eleventh grade students enrolled in mathematics courses in six high schools in a large urban school district.

28. Simple Random Sampling

  • The targeted population of 827 African American eleventh grade studentsenrolled inthe eleventh grade in 2006-2007 will be involved in the random sample.
  • Krejcie and Morgan in 1970 generated a model of appropriate sample size (Barlett, Ko