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SCHOOL OF SCHOOL OF SCHOOL OF SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES HUMANITIES HUMANITIES HUMANITIES ARTS 2285 ARTS 2285 ARTS 2285 ARTS 2285 The Holocaust and Genocide The Holocaust and Genocide The Holocaust and Genocide The Holocaust and Genocide in in in in Historical Perspective Historical Perspective Historical Perspective Historical Perspective SUMMER SUMMER SUMMER SUMMER SESSION, SESSION, SESSION, SESSION, 2013 2013 2013 2013, U1B , U1B , U1B , U1B

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  • SCHOOL OF SCHOOL OF SCHOOL OF SCHOOL OF HUMANITIESHUMANITIESHUMANITIESHUMANITIES

    ARTS 2285ARTS 2285ARTS 2285ARTS 2285

    The Holocaust and GenocideThe Holocaust and GenocideThe Holocaust and GenocideThe Holocaust and Genocide in in in in

    Historical PerspectiveHistorical PerspectiveHistorical PerspectiveHistorical Perspective

    SUMMER SUMMER SUMMER SUMMER SESSION, SESSION, SESSION, SESSION, 2013201320132013, U1B, U1B, U1B, U1B

  • Page 2 of 27

    TABLE OF CONTENTSTABLE OF CONTENTSTABLE OF CONTENTSTABLE OF CONTENTS

    COURSE STAFFCOURSE STAFFCOURSE STAFFCOURSE STAFF ........................................................................................................... 3

    COURSE DETAILSCOURSE DETAILSCOURSE DETAILSCOURSE DETAILS ........................................................................................................ 3

    COURSE AIMSCOURSE AIMSCOURSE AIMSCOURSE AIMS ............................................................................................................. 3

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTSTUDENT LEARNING OUTSTUDENT LEARNING OUTSTUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMESCOMESCOMESCOMES ............................................................................... 3

    LEARNING AND TEACHINLEARNING AND TEACHINLEARNING AND TEACHINLEARNING AND TEACHING RATIONALEG RATIONALEG RATIONALEG RATIONALE ...................................................................... 4

    TEACHING STRATEGIESTEACHING STRATEGIESTEACHING STRATEGIESTEACHING STRATEGIES .............................................................................................. 4

    BACKGROUND READING:BACKGROUND READING:BACKGROUND READING:BACKGROUND READING: ............................................................................................ 5

    COURSE SCHEDULECOURSE SCHEDULECOURSE SCHEDULECOURSE SCHEDULE .................................................................................................... 6

    ASSESSMENTASSESSMENTASSESSMENTASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................... 24

    ATTENDANCEATTENDANCEATTENDANCEATTENDANCE ............................................................................................................ 26

    ACADEMIC HONESTY ANDACADEMIC HONESTY ANDACADEMIC HONESTY ANDACADEMIC HONESTY AND PLAGIARISMPLAGIARISMPLAGIARISMPLAGIARISM .................................................................. 26

    OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICYAND SAFETY POLICYAND SAFETY POLICYAND SAFETY POLICY ........................................................ 26

    STUDENT EQUITY AND DSTUDENT EQUITY AND DSTUDENT EQUITY AND DSTUDENT EQUITY AND DIVERSITYIVERSITYIVERSITYIVERSITY ............................................................................ 26

    OTHER STUDENT INFORMOTHER STUDENT INFORMOTHER STUDENT INFORMOTHER STUDENT INFORMATIONATIONATIONATION .............................................................................. 27

  • Page 3 of 27

    COURSE STAFFCOURSE STAFFCOURSE STAFFCOURSE STAFF

    ConvenerConvenerConvenerConvener/Lecturer/Lecturer/Lecturer/Lecturer Details:Details:Details:Details:

    Name: Dr Jan Lnek

    Room: Morven Brown 364

    Phone: 9385 1497

    Email: [email protected]

    Consultation Times: Mo-Fr 2-3pm;

    COURSE DETAILSCOURSE DETAILSCOURSE DETAILSCOURSE DETAILS

    The aim of 'Holocaust and Genocide' is to encourage an understanding of the phenomenon of

    genocide through incidences of mass killing of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries and

    ways in which people respond to state-sponsored violence. The course predominantly focuses

    on an intensive study of the Holocaust, and offers diverse perspectives on the groups of

    perpetrators, victims and bystanders. The course also looks closely at other genocides

    committed by Nazi Germany during the Second World War (Slavs, religious minorities,

    disabled and homosexuals) and in the last part moves on to examine the Holocaust in relation

    to other acts of genocide and mass killing during the twentieth and twenty-first century

    (Armenian genocide, Yugoslavia and Rwanda).

    Units of Credit: Units of Credit: Units of Credit: Units of Credit: 6

    COURSE AIMSCOURSE AIMSCOURSE AIMSCOURSE AIMS

    The aims of this course are:

    To give students an understanding of the history of the Holocaust.

    To give students an understanding of the human behaviour in face of state-sponsored

    policies of mass violence against minorities.

    To introduce the main categories of actors during the Holocaust (perpetrators, victims

    and bystanders/onlookers).

    To give students an overview of the relation between genocides and armed conflicts

    during the twentieth century.

    To give students an introduction to the issues concerning Holocaust representation in

    film and literature.

    To present comparative perspectives to the mass violence during the twentieth

    century.

    STUDENT LEARNING OUTSTUDENT LEARNING OUTSTUDENT LEARNING OUTSTUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMESCOMESCOMESCOMES

    At the completion of this course students will be able to:

    By the end of the course students will have a good knowledge concerning the history

    of the Holocaust, including its origins and the aftermath. Students will have gained

  • Page 4 of 27

    insights into the ways in which divergent actors (perpetrators, victims and bystanders)

    responded to the Nazi organized mass violence during World War 2. They will also

    gain knowledge concerning the initiation and execution of the genocidal violence

    during the twentieth century. Furthermore, students will have learned:

    to communicate ideas to others in a clear and concise manner, both orally and in

    written form

    to approach intellectual questions in a rigorous and academic manner, employing

    analytical skills and independent and reflective thinking

    to critically analyse scholarly material

    LEARNING AND TEACHINLEARNING AND TEACHINLEARNING AND TEACHINLEARNING AND TEACHING RATIONALEG RATIONALEG RATIONALEG RATIONALE

    The purpose of lectures is to give the students an overview of the historical events and

    introduce them on major issues of Holocaust historiography. In tutorials students will be

    encouraged to engage critically with primary sources and contextualise them with the

    secondary readings available before the class. Students will be required to give a short tutorial

    presentation (based on the available primary and secondary sources), to undertake

    independent research and to write an analytical essay. The knowledge gathered during the

    lectures and tutorials and the understanding of the discussed sources will be tested in the final

    in-class exam. In this way, students will be able to develop the above skills in the context of

    the specific learning offered by this course.

    TEACHING STRATEGIESTEACHING STRATEGIESTEACHING STRATEGIESTEACHING STRATEGIES

    Over the course of the semester I will use email to send important messages, reminders, or

    updates to you. Please make sure that you check your university email account regularly, or

    that you set it up to forward your email to another account.

    All students will need to have a copy of the reading kit. The reader is available for purchase

    from the UNSW Bookshop. Essential reading for each day is set out in the lecture and tutorial

    program below. A part of the essential reading is available online (links are provided below),

    but other resources will be accessible only in the reading kit. I understand that this is an

    intensive course and that you may not have time to prepare readings for every tutorial. Hence

    although I hope that all of you will at least check the readings, I expect that only those of you

    having tutorial presentations will read all the secondary sources. However, I expect all of you

    to be prepared to discuss the primary sources and will be able to contribute to our tutorial discussions. Further suggested readings are listed as part of the tutorial description and at the

    end of the syllabus.

  • Page 5 of 27

    BACKGROUND READING:BACKGROUND READING:BACKGROUND READING:BACKGROUND READING:

    None of these books are compulsory, but I strongly encourage you to check these volumes as

    a background reading for the course. The books are accessible in the University library (or

    online via the University library catalogue). The items can also be purchased in the University

    bookstore.

    Yehuda Bauer, A History of the Holocaust (New York: F. Watts, 1982). Doris Bergen, War and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust (Lanham: Rowman &

    Littlefield Publishers, 2009). Jonathan C. Friedman (ed.), Routledge History of the Holocaust (London: Routledge, 2012). Saul Friedlaender, Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1933-1945: Abridged Edition (New York:

    HarperCollins, 2009).

    Yisrael Gutman ed., Holocaust Encyclopaedia, 4 Volumes (New York: Macmillan, 1990). Michael R. Marrus, The Holocaust in History (London: Penguin 1989).

    In preparation for tutorials and for your written assignments, I strongly encourage you to

    consult holdings in the University library or in the Sydney Jewish museum. You can also

    consult online resources, but be extremely cautious to use only reliable websites. Please DO

    NOT use www.wikipedia.org unless absolutely necessary (you are NOT allowed to use

    www.wikipedia.org as a source in your essays). Although Wikipedia could often provide you

    with valuable information, the nature of a free encyclopaedia does not necessarily guarantee

    that only correct information is included. Rather try to check the following websites in the first

    place:

    www.holocuastchronicle.com

    www.ushmm.org

    www.yadvashem.org

    www.yivoencyclopaedia.com

  • Page 6 of 27

    COURSE SCHEDULECOURSE SCHEDULECOURSE SCHEDULECOURSE SCHEDULE

    LECTURES, Biomedical Theatre A (E27)LECTURES, Biomedical Theatre A (E27)LECTURES, Biomedical Theatre A (E27)LECTURES, Biomedical Theatre A (E27)

    7 January History of antisemitism

    Pre-1939 European Jewish history

    8 January Nazi Rise to Power

    Triumph of the Will in-class film (excerpts)

    9 January Nazi Policies 1933-39

    Emigration the World and the Jews 1933-1939

    10 January Survivor talk (Peter Rossler, a survivor of the Lodz ghetto and Auschwitz)

    Eugenics and the Euthanasia programme

    14 January Ghettos during World War 2

    A Film Unfinished in-class film (excerpts)

    15 January Radicalization of the Jewish policies (the War in the East)

    The Final Solution

    16 January Concentration and extermination camps

    Jewish resistance

    17 January Local collaborators and rescuers (Polish-Jewish relations)

    In Darkness in-class film (excerpts)

    21 January Nazi Satellites and the Holocaust

    Other victims of Nazi genocides (Roma, Jehovahs Witnesses,

    Homosexuals)

    22 January Allies and the Holocaust (1939-1945)

    Aftermath

    23 January Representation of the Holocaust

    Shoah in-class film (excerpts)

    24 January Genocides in the twentieth century (Armenian genocide, Cambodia,

    Rwanda, Former Yugoslavia)

    25 January Exam

  • Page 7 of 27

    TUTORIAL 1TUTORIAL 1TUTORIAL 1TUTORIAL 1

    7 Ja7 Ja7 Ja7 January 2013nuary 2013nuary 2013nuary 2013

    History of antiHistory of antiHistory of antiHistory of anti----Judaism and Judaism and Judaism and Judaism and anananantitititi----SemitismSemitismSemitismSemitism

    RRRReadingeadingeadingeadingssss::::

    Raul Hilberg, The Destruction of the European Jews: Precedents, in Omer Bartov (ed.), The Holocaust. Origins, Implementation, Aftermath (London: Routledge, 2000), pp. 21-42.

    PPPPrimary sources:rimary sources:rimary sources:rimary sources:

    Excerpts from Martin Luther, On the Jews and Their Lies, 1543, in Steve Hochstadt (ed.),

    Sources of the Holocaust (London: Palgrave, 2004), pp. 13-15. Excerpts from article Jewish Morality in Vatican newspaper, 10 January 1893, in Hochstadt,

    pp. 19-21.

    Excerpt from Heinrich von Treitschke, Our Views, 1879, in Hochstadt, pp.26-8.

    Wilhelm Marr, The Victory of Judaism over Germandom (1879), in Paul Mendes-Flohr and

    Jehuda Reinharz (eds.), The Jew in the Modern World. A Documentary History. Second Edition (Oxford: OUP, 1995), pp. 331-3.

    Karl Eugen Duehring, The Question of the Jew Is a Question of Race (1881), in Mendes-Flohr,

    pp. 333-4

    Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Jews: Oppressed or Oppressors? (1877), in Mendes Flohr, 337-338.

    Protocols of the Elders of Zion (c. 1902), Mendes-Flohr, pp. 363-367.

    Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:

    Compare provided primary sources and discuss the transformation of anti-Jewish prejudices

    across centuries.

    How did anti-Jewish prejudices develop over the time?

    What were the sources and origins of anti-Jewish sentiments in European societies?

    What is the difference between anti-Judaism and anti-Semitism?

    What was the basis of racial anti-Semitism?

    How did anti-Jewish prejudices develop in the age of nationalism?

    Who and why wrote the so-called Protocols of the Elders of Zion?

  • Page 8 of 27

    TUTORIAL 2TUTORIAL 2TUTORIAL 2TUTORIAL 2

    8 January 2013 8 January 2013 8 January 2013 8 January 2013

    Nazi Nazi Nazi Nazi ideology, ideology, ideology, ideology, propaganda and the Jewspropaganda and the Jewspropaganda and the Jewspropaganda and the Jews

    ReadingReadingReadingReadingssss::::

    Adolf Hitler, Nation and Race, in Simone Gigliotti and Berel Lang (eds.), The Holocaust. A Reader (Oxford: Blackwell, 2005), pp. 68-81.

    Jan Grabowski, German Anti-Jewish Propaganda in the Generalgouvernement, 19391945:

    Inciting Hate through Posters, Films, and Exhibitions, in Holocaust and Genocide

    Studies, 23:3, Winter 2009, pp. 381-412 (http://hgs.oxfordjournals.org/content/23/3/381.full.pdf)

    Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:

    Childrens story from Ernst Hiemer, The Poisonous Mushroom, in Hochstadt, pp. 52-55. Pictures from Jeffrey Herf

    http://www.ushmm.org/propaganda/

    Tutorial questionsTutorial questionsTutorial questionsTutorial questions (discuss images from the course reader and USHMM webpage)(discuss images from the course reader and USHMM webpage)(discuss images from the course reader and USHMM webpage)(discuss images from the course reader and USHMM webpage)::::

    Summarize the ideology of Race and Nation as depicted in Hitlers Mein Kampf.

    How did the Nazi propaganda depict the Jews between 1933 and 1945?

    What was the purpose of Nazi propaganda?

    How did Leni Riefenstahl depict the rebirth of the German nation? (in-class film)

    What was the role played by the Nazi propaganda in the segregation of German Jews before

    1939?

    How did the Nazi propaganda appeal to German children?

    What is the role played by propaganda in totalitarian societies?

    Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:

    David Bankier, The Germans and the final solution: public opinion under Nazism (Oxford: Balckwell, 1992).

    Saul Friedlnder, Nazi Germany and the Jews. Volume 1, The years of persecution, 1933-1939

    (London: Phoenix, 1998).

    Jeffrey Herf, The Jewish Enemy: Nazi Propaganda during World War 2 and the Holocaust

    (Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap, 2006).

    Victor Klemperer, I will bear witness: a diary of the Nazi years (New York: Random House, 1998-9).

    Michael R. Marrus (ed.), The Nazi Holocaust, Volume 5. Public Opinion and Relations to the Jews in Nazi Europe (Westport: Meckler, 1989).

  • Page 9 of 27

    Probing the depths of German antisemitism: German society and the persecution of the Jews, 1933-1941 (New York: Berghahn, 2000).

    Karl A. Schleunes, The twisted road to Auschwitz; Nazi policy toward German Jews, 1933-

    1939 (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1979).

  • Page 10 of 27

    TUTORIAL 3TUTORIAL 3TUTORIAL 3TUTORIAL 3

    9 9 9 9 JanJanJanJanuary 2013uary 2013uary 2013uary 2013

    Jewish responses to the Nazi persecution (until 1939)Jewish responses to the Nazi persecution (until 1939)Jewish responses to the Nazi persecution (until 1939)Jewish responses to the Nazi persecution (until 1939)

    Readings:Readings:Readings:Readings:

    Marion Kaplan, Persecution and Gender: German-Jewish responses to Persecution in

    Jonathan C. Friedman (ed.), The Routledge History of the Holocaust (London: Routledge,

    2012, pp. 90-102. (available online via the UNSW Library catalogue)

    Ian Kershaw, The Persecution of the Jews and German Popular Opinion in the Third Reich,

    Leo Baeck Institute Yearbook 26, (1981), pp. 261-89.

    (http://leobaeck.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/1/261.full.pdf)

    Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:

    Robert Weltsch, Wear the Yellow Badge with Pride (April 4, 1933), in Mendes-Flohr, pp.

    640-1.

    Reischsvertretung der Deutschen Juden, Proclamation of the (New) Reichsvertretung, in

    Mendes Flohr, pp. 643-5.

    The Reichsvertretung addresses the Reich government, in Lucy S. Dawidowicz (ed.), A

    Holocaust Reader (New York: Behrman House, 1976), pp. 155-159.

    The Reichsvertretung Program after the Nuremberg Laws, in Dawidowicz, pp. 162-164.

    Tutorial questionsTutorial questionsTutorial questionsTutorial questions

    How did the German public opinion about the Jews develop during 1933-1939?

    How did ordinary Germans respond to the gradual segregation and persecution of the Jews?

    How did the German Jews respond to the Nazi racial policies?

    What conditioned the decision of Jews to leave Germany and emigrate elsewhere?

    Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:

    Saul Friedlnder, Nazi Germany and the Jews. Volume 1, The years of persecution, 1933-1939

    (London: Phoenix, 1998).

    Marion Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair. Jewish Life in Nazi Germany (Oxford: OUP,

    1998).

    Victor Klemperer, I will bear witness: a diary of the Nazi years (New York: Random House,

    1998-9).

  • Page 11 of 27

    TUTORIAL 4TUTORIAL 4TUTORIAL 4TUTORIAL 4

    10 January 2013 10 January 2013 10 January 2013 10 January 2013

    The Final Solution: Intentionalists and functionalistsThe Final Solution: Intentionalists and functionalistsThe Final Solution: Intentionalists and functionalistsThe Final Solution: Intentionalists and functionalists

    RRRReadingeadingeadingeadingssss::::

    Christopher Browning, The Origins of the Final Solution, in Jonathan C. Friedman (ed.), The Routledge History of the Holocaust (London: Routledge, 2012, pp. 156-167. (available online via the UNSW Library catalogue)

    Ian Kershaw, Hitlers role in the Final Solution, Yad Vashem Studies 34, 2004, pp. 7-43 (http://www.genocideeducation.ca/kershaw.pdf) Also available in Ian Kershaw, Hitler, the

    Germans and the Final Solution (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008), pp. 89-117

    (available online via the UNSW Library catalogue).

    Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:

    Article by Josef Goebbels on Jews in Das Reich, 16 November 1941, in Hochstadt, pp. 129-131.

    Adolf Hitler on the Annihilation of the Jews, in Dawidowicz, pp. 30-33.

    Protocols of the Wannsee Conference (January 20, 1942), in Mendes-Flohr, pp. 662-665.

    Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:

    How do various historians explain the origins of the Final Solution?

    How can we interpret Hitlers early proclamations on the Jewish question?

    What was the relation between the war and the Holocaust?

    What happened in Wannsee in January 1942?

    What was Hitlers role in the Final Solution?

    Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:

    Christopher Browning, Fateful months: essays on the emergence of the final solution (New

    York: Holmes and Meier, 1991).

    Christopher Browning, The origins of the Final Solution : the evolution of Nazi Jewish policy,

    September 1939-March 1942 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2004).

    Lucy S. Dawidowicz, The War Against the Jews (New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1975). Christian Gerlach, The Wannsee Conference, the Fate of German Jews, and Hitler's Decision in

    Principle to Exterminate All European Jews, in The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 70, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 759-812 (available online)

    Ian Kershaw, Hitler, the Germans and the Final Solution (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008).

  • Page 12 of 27

    TUTORIAL 5TUTORIAL 5TUTORIAL 5TUTORIAL 5

    14 January 201314 January 201314 January 201314 January 2013

    Ordinary men or ordinary GermansOrdinary men or ordinary GermansOrdinary men or ordinary GermansOrdinary men or ordinary Germans? Motivations for mass murder? Motivations for mass murder? Motivations for mass murder? Motivations for mass murder

    RRRReadingeadingeadingeadingssss::::

    Christopher Browning, Ordinary Germans or Ordinary Men?, in Michael Berenbaum and

    Abraham J. Peck (eds.), The Holocaust and History. The Known, the Unknown, the

    Disputed, and the Reexamined (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1998), pp. 252-265.

    Daniel Jonah Goldhagen, Ordinary Men or Ordinary Germans? in Michael Berenbaum and

    Abraham J. Peck (eds.), The Holocaust and History. The Known, the Unknown, the Disputed, and

    the Reexamined (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1998), pp. 301-307.

    Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:

    Gitta Sereny, Into that Darkness: From Mercy Killing to Mass Murder (London: Deutsch, 1974), excerpts (course reader).

    Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:

    Discuss the views of Goldhagen and Browning on the German participation in the Nazi plans

    of the Final Solution.

    Were the Germans who took part in the mass murder of the Jews ordinary men or Hitlers

    willing executioners?

    Who was Franz Stangl?

    How does Stangl explain the Nazi extermination of the Jews?

    Was Stangl an ordinary man or an ordinary German?

    How did he explain his participation in the Holocaust?

    Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:

    Christopher Browning, Ordinary men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the final solution in Poland (New York: Aaron Asher Books, 1992).

    Daniel J. Goldhagen, Hitler's willing executioners : ordinary Germans and the Holocaust (New York: Knopf, 1996).

    Ernst Klee et al. (eds.) "The Good old days" : the Holocaust as seen by its perpetrators and

    bystanders (New York: Free Press, 1991).

  • Page 13 of 27

    TTTTUTORIALUTORIALUTORIALUTORIAL 6666

    15 January 201315 January 201315 January 201315 January 2013

    Jewish Councils (Jewish Councils (Jewish Councils (Jewish Councils (JudenraeteJudenraeteJudenraeteJudenraete) and Police: Collaboration?) and Police: Collaboration?) and Police: Collaboration?) and Police: Collaboration?

    RRRReadings:eadings:eadings:eadings:

    Celel Perechodnik, Am I a Murderer? Testament of a Jewish Ghetto Policeman (Oxford:

    WestviewPress, 1996), pp. 25-52.

    Primo Levi, Gray Zone, in Omer Bartov (ed.), The Holocaust: origins, Implementation,

    Aftermath (London: Routledge, 2000), pp. 251-272.

    Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:

    From the Minute Book of the Lublin Judenrat AND From the Minute Book of the Bialystok

    Judenrat (EXCERPTS), in Dawidowicz, pp. 264-69; 276-80; 283-7.

    Rumkowskis Address at the Time of the Deportation of the Children from the Lodz Ghetto,

    September 4, 1942 AND Notes by a Jewish Observer in the Lodz Ghetto following the

    Deportation of the Children , in Yitzhak Arad et al. (eds.) Documents on the Holocaust

    (Jerusalem: Yad Vashem, 1981), pp. 283-86.

    Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:

    What do you understand as Jewish collaboration with the Nazis?

    Discuss memoirs by Celel Perechodnik.

    Who was Mordechai Rumkowski?

    What does Primo Levi understand under the term Gray zone?

    What was the function of the Jewish Councils? Were they collaborators in the destruction of

    the Jews?

    Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:

    Gordon J. Horwitz, Ghettostadt: Lodz and the Making of a Nazi City (Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap, 2008).

    Patterns of Jewish Leadership in Nazi Europe, 1933-1945, Proceedings of the Third Yad Vashem International Historical Conference. (Jerusalem: Yad Vashem, 1979).

    Isaiah Trunk, Judenrat: the Jewish councils in Eastern Europe under Nazi occupation (New York:

    Macmillan, 1972).

    Isaiah Trunk, d Ghetto: a history (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006).

    Leonard Tushnet, The Pavement of Hell (New York: St. Martins Press, 1972). The Warsaw diary of Adam Czerniakow : prelude to doom (New York: Stein and Day, 1979).

  • Page 14 of 27

    TUTORIATUTORIATUTORIATUTORIAL 7L 7L 7L 7

    16 January 201316 January 201316 January 201316 January 2013

    RRRResistanceesistanceesistanceesistance

    RRRReadings:eadings:eadings:eadings:

    Yehuda Bauer, Jewish Resistance Myth or Reality?, in Rethinking the Holocaust (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001), pp. 119-142.

    Nechama Tec, Reflections on Resistance and Gender, in Remembering for the Future. The Holocaust in an Age of Genocide, Volume 1 (London: Palgrave, 2001), pp. 552-569.

    Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:

    Call for resistance in the Vilna Ghetto, January 1942, in Hochstadt, pp. 186-8.

    From Justinas Diary: Resistance in Cracow, in Dawidowicz, pp. 340-347.

    Address by Gens on the Danger of bringing Arms into the Vilna Ghetto, May 15, 1943, in

    Arad et al., pp. 453-455.

    Proclamation by the F.P.O. calling for Revolt in Vilna, September 1, 1943, in Arad et al., pp.

    459-460.

    Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:

    How would you define Jewish resistance to the Nazis?

    What does Yehuda Bauer understand under the term Amidah?

    How does Nechama Tec understand the term resistance?

    What role did women play in the resistance during World War 2?

    Further readings:Further readings:Further readings:Further readings:

    Yehuda Bauer, Unarmed Resistance and Other Responses, in Rethinking the Holocaust (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001), 143-166.

    James M. Glass, Jewish Resistance During the Holocaust : Moral Uses of Violence and Will

    (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2004).

    Michael R. Marrus (ed.), The Nazi Holocaust, Volume 7., Jewish Resistance to the Holocaust (Westport: Meckler, 1989).

    Yuri Suhl, The Fought Back: The Story of Jewish Resistance in Nazi Europe (New York: Schocken Books, 1975).

  • Page 15 of 27

    TUTORIAL 8TUTORIAL 8TUTORIAL 8TUTORIAL 8

    17 January 201317 January 201317 January 201317 January 2013

    ConcentratiConcentratiConcentratiConcentration on on on and extermination campsand extermination campsand extermination campsand extermination camps

    RRRReadings:eadings:eadings:eadings:

    Franciszek Piper, Auschwitz Concentration Camp, in Michael Berenbaum and Abraham J.

    Peck (eds.), The Holocaust and History. The Known, the Unknown, the Disputed, and the

    Reexamined (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1998), pp. 371-386.

    Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:

    Tadeusz Borowski, This Way for the Gas Ladies and Gentlemen (London: Penguin, 1980), pp.

    29-49.

    Primo Levi, If this is a man (New York: Orion, 1959), pp. 15-34.

    Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:

    What does Borowskis account tell us about the life in Auschwitz?

    What were the main purposes of Nazi concentration camps?

    Who were the victims of the Nazi camps?

    Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:

    Yitzhak Arad, Belzec, Sobibor, Treblinka: Operation Reinhard Death Camps (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1987).

    Deborah Dwork Robert Jan van Pelt, Auschwitz, 1270 to the Present (New York: Norton,

    1996).

    Yisrael Gutman Michael Berenbaum (eds.), Anatomy of the Auschwitz Death Camp (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1994).

    Rudolf Hss, Death Dealer: the Memoirs of the SS Kommandant at Auschwitz (Buffalo:

    Prometheus Press, 1992).

    Filip Mller, Eyewitness Auschwitz: Three Years in the Gas Chambers (Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1992).

    Sarah Nomberg-Przytyk, Auschwitz: True Tales from a Grotesque Land (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1986).

    Wolfgang Sofsky, The Order of Terror: The Concentration Camp (Princeton: Princeton

    University Press, 1997).

    Tzvetan Todorov, Facing the Extreme: Moral Life in the Concentration Camps (New York:: Metropolitan Press, 1996).

  • Page 16 of 27

    TUTORIAL 9TUTORIAL 9TUTORIAL 9TUTORIAL 9

    21 January 201321 January 201321 January 201321 January 2013

    Bystanders, onlookers (local population)Bystanders, onlookers (local population)Bystanders, onlookers (local population)Bystanders, onlookers (local population)

    RRRReadingeadingeadingeadingssss::::

    Jan Grabowski, Rural Society and the Jews in Hiding: Elders, Night Watches. Firefighters,

    Hostages and Manhunts, in Yad Vashem Studies, Volume 40:1, 2012, pp. 49-74.

    David Engel, An Early Account of Polish Jewry under Nazi and Soviet Occupation Presented to

    the Polish Government-in-Exile, February 1940, in Jewish Social Studies, Vol. 45, No. 1 (Winter, 1983), pp. 1-16. (available via jstor.org)

    [http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/4467201.pdf?acceptTC=true]

    Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:

    In-class Film: Agnieszka Holland, In Darkness (excerpts)

    Zofia Kossak-Szczucka, Protest (the course reader)

    Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:

    Who was a bystander? Do you agree with the term being used in the Holocaust

    historiography?

    Grabowski describes the so-called Judenjagd. What was it and why did the local population

    collaborate with the Nazis?

    What conditioned locals decisions whether to help or betray the Jews?

    How did Karski describe Polish-Jewish relations in occupied Poland? Why did he prepare two

    versions of the account? Why and how did the versions differ?

    Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:

    Steven K. Baum, The psychology of genocide : perpetrators, bystanders, and rescuers

    (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008).

    East European Politics and Society, Volume 25 (3), August 2011 the whole volume focuses

    on Polish-Jewish relations during World War 2 (available online).

    Jan T. Gross, Neighbors: The Destruction of the Jewish Community in Jedwabne, Poland

    (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001).

    Raul Hilberg, Perpetrators, Victims, Bystanders: The Jewish Catastrophe, 1933-1945 (New

    York: Aaron Asher, 1992).

    Klee, Ernst, et.al. The Good Old Days: the Holocaust as seen by its Perpetrators and Bystanders (New York: the Free Press, 1991).

  • Page 17 of 27

    TUTORIAL 10TUTORIAL 10TUTORIAL 10TUTORIAL 10

    22 January 201322 January 201322 January 201322 January 2013

    Allies and the Holocaust: Allies and the Holocaust: Allies and the Holocaust: Allies and the Holocaust: the World responds to genocidesthe World responds to genocidesthe World responds to genocidesthe World responds to genocides

    RRRReadings:eadings:eadings:eadings:

    Tony Kushner, Different worlds: British perceptions of the Final Solution during the Second

    World War, in David Cesarani, The Final Solution. Origins and Implementation, pp.

    246-268.

    Miroslav Karny, The Vrba and Wetzler Report, in Yisrael Gutman Michael Berenbaum

    (eds.), Anatomy of the Auschwitz Death Camp (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana

    University Press, 1994), pp. 553-568.

    Primary Sources:Primary Sources:Primary Sources:Primary Sources:

    The UN Declaration and the following debate in the House of Commons (17 December 1942)

    (http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1942/dec/17/united-nations-declaration)

    Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:

    What were the Auschwitz Protocols? Did they make any impact in the West?

    How would you describe the responses of the Allies to the persecution of the Jews?

    What conditioned, according to Kushner, the responses of the western governments?

    What can the Allies responses to the Holocaust teach us about our contemporary responses

    to genocides?

    Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:

    Richard Breitman Alan M. Kraut, American refugee policy and European Jewry, 1933-1945 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1987).

    Jan Karski, Story of a Secret State (Boston: Houghon Mifflin, 1944). Tony Kushner, The persistence of prejudice : antisemitism in British society during the Second

    World War (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1989).

    Peter Novick, The Holocaust in American Life (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999). William Rubinstein, Myth of Rescue: why the democracies could not have saved more Jews

    from the Nazis (London: Routledge, 1997).

    E. Thomas Wood Stanislw M. Jankowski, Karski: How One Man Tried to Stop the Holocaust

    (New York: Wiley and Sons, 1996).

    David S. Wyman, Abandonment of the Jews: America and the Holocaust (New York: Pantheon, 1984).

    David S. Wyman, Why Auschwitz Wasnt Bombed, in Yisrael Gutman Michael Berenbaum

    (eds.), Anatomy of the Auschwitz Death Camp (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1994), pp. 553-568.

  • Page 18 of 27

    TUTORIAL 11TUTORIAL 11TUTORIAL 11TUTORIAL 11

    22223333 January 2013January 2013January 2013January 2013

    RepreRepreRepreRepresentation of the Holocaust: sentation of the Holocaust: sentation of the Holocaust: sentation of the Holocaust: case studies of case studies of case studies of case studies of ShoahShoahShoahShoah aaaandndndnd MausMausMausMaus

    RRRReadingeadingeadingeadingssss::::

    Shoshana Felman, In an Era of Testimony: Claude Lanzmanns Shoah, Yale French Studies, no. 79, Spring 1991, pp. 39-81. (http://www.jstor.org/stable/2930246)

    James E Young, The Holocaust as Vicarious Past: Art Spiegelman's Maus and the Afterimages

    of History, Critical Inquiry 24, no. 3 (1998), pp. 666-699. (http://www.jstor.org/stable/1344086)

    Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:

    Art Spiegelman, Maus. A Survivors Tale (New York: Pantheon, 1986), pp. 73-93.

    Art Spiegelman, Maus II. A Survivors Tale. And Here my Troubles began (New York: Penguin Books, 1991), pp. 24-37.

    Shoah (we will watch parts in our lecture) you can also watch the whole film at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XNIrrJe_7g

    Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:

    What are the problems of representing the Holocaust (Maus)?

    What is the so-called second generation (Maus)?

    Are there any limits of representation (Maus)?

    Is it possible to reveal the horrors of the Holocaust in a comic book?

    How do Lanzmann and Spiegelman depict perpetrators, bystanders and victims?

    What role do testimonies play in our understanding and comprehending of the Holocaust?

    FurtheFurtheFurtheFurther reading:r reading:r reading:r reading:

    Claude Lanzmann, The Obscenity of Understanding: An Evening with Claude Lanzmann in

    Cathy Caruth, ed., Trauma: Explorations in Memory (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995), pp. 200-220.

    Claude Lanzmann, Seminar with Claude Lanzmann: 11 April 1990, Yale French Studies, no. 79, January 1991, pp. 82-99.

    Art Spiegelman, Maus II. A Survivors Tale. And Here my Troubles began (New York: Penguin Books, 1991).

  • Page 19 of 27

    TUTORIAL 12TUTORIAL 12TUTORIAL 12TUTORIAL 12

    24 January 201324 January 201324 January 201324 January 2013

    The Holocaust and The Holocaust and The Holocaust and The Holocaust and other other other other genocides genocides genocides genocides

    RRRReadingeadingeadingeadings:s:s:s:

    Mark Levene, Is the Holocaust Simply Another Example of Genocide?, in Simone Gigliotti and

    Berel Lang, The Holocaust. A Reader (Oxford: Blackwell, 2005), pp. 420-447.

    Yehuda Bauer, On the Holocaust and other genocides, Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff

    Annual Lecture, Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, the United States Holocaust

    Memorial Museum, 2006.

    (http://www.ushmm.org/research/center/publications/occasional/2007-03/paper.pdf)

    Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:Primary sources:

    International Tribunal Judgement against Radislav Krsti, in Hochstadt, p. 288-90.

    Text of the UN Declaration on Genocide, in Alexander Laban Hinton (ed.), Genocide: An

    Anthropological Reader (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 2002), pp. 43-47.

    Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:Tutorial questions:

    Was the Holocaust a unique event in history?

    What is the difference, if any, between the Holocaust and genocides?

    How would you define genocide? Give some examples.

    What is ethnic cleansing?

    Can you see any omissions in the UN Convention on Genocide? Debate.

    Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:Further reading:

    Yehuda Bauer, Rethinking the Holocaust (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001), pp. 39-67.

    Donald Bloxham, Organized Mass Murder: Structure, Participation, and Motivation in

    Comparative Perspective, in Holocaust and Genocide Studies, 22:2, Fall 2008, pp.

    203-245 (online).

    Alexander Laban Hinton (ed.), Genocide: An Anthropological Reader (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 2002).

    A. Dirk Moses and Donald Bloxham, Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing, in Political Violence in Twentieth Century Europe, pp. 87-139.

  • Page 20 of 27

    Suggested further reSuggested further reSuggested further reSuggested further readingadingadingading On the Holocaust:On the Holocaust:On the Holocaust:On the Holocaust:

    Alan Adelson and Robert Lapides (eds,), Lodz Ghetto: Inside a Community Under Siege (New York: Viking, 1989).

    Jacques Adler, The Nazi-Imposed Jewish Councils. A Critical View. In Mark Baker, ed. History

    on the Edge. Melbourne, 1997. 220-43. Jean Amery, At the Minds Limits: Contemplations by a Survivor of Auschwitz. New York,

    1986.

    Yitzhak Arad et al. (eds.) Documents on the Holocaust (Jerusalem: Yad Vashem, 1981).

    Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil (New York: Penguin, 1963).

    Omer Bartov (ed.), Holocaust: Origins, Implementation, Aftermath (New York: Routledge,

    2000).

    Yehuda Bauer, Rethinking the Holocaust (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2001). Yehuda Bauer, The Death of the Shtetl (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009).

    Michael Berenbaum and Abraham Peck (eds.), The Holocaust and History: the Known, the Unknown, the Disputed and the Reexamined. Bloomington: Indiana University Press (in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, D.C.),

    1998.

    Randolph L. Braham (ed.), The Destruction of Romanian and Ukrainian Jews During the Antonescu era (Boulder: Social Science Monographs; New York: 1997).

    Christopher R. Browning, Nazi Policy, Jewish Workers, German Killers (Cambridge: Cambridge

    University Press, 2000).

    Christopher Browning, The origins of the Final Solution : the evolution of Nazi Jewish policy,

    September 1939-March 1942 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2004).

    Tadeusz Borowski, This Way for the Gas Ladies and Gentlemen (London: Penguin, 1980). David Cesarani (ed.), Genocide and Rescue: the Holocaust in Hungary 1944 (Oxford: Berg,

    1997).

    Lucy S. Dawidowicz, The War Against the Jews (New York: New York : Holt, Rinehart and

    Winston, 1975).

    Terence Des Pres, The Survivor: an Anatomy of Life in the Death Camps (New York: Oxford University Press, 1976).

    Thomas P. DiNapoli (ed.), The Italian Jewish experience (Stony Brook, NY: Forum Italicum, 2000).

    Lucjan Dobroszycki (ed.), The Chronicle of the Lodz Ghetto 1941-1944 (New Haven: Yal;e

    University Press, 1984).

    Henry Friedlander, The Origins of Nazi Genocide: From Euthanasia to the Final Solution (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1995).

    Jacob Glatstein (ed.), Anthology of Holocaust Literature (New York: Atheneum, 1973).

    Daniel Jonah Goldhagen, Hitlers Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1996).

    Yisrael Gutman, The Jews of Warsaw, 1939-43. Ghetto, Underground, Revolt. (Bloomington:

    Indiana University Press, 1982).

    Raul Hilberg, The Destruction of the European Jews (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003).

  • Page 21 of 27

    Radu Ioanid, The Holocaust in Romania: The Destruction of Jews and Gypsies Under the Antonescu Regime, 1940-1944 (Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 2000).

    Louis de Jong, The Netherlands and Nazi Germany (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University

    Press, 1990).

    Chaim Kaplan, C. The Scroll of Agony. The Warsaw Diary of Chaim Kaplan (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999).

    Ernst Klee et.al. (eds.), The Good Old Days: the Holocaust as seen by its Perpetrators and Bystanders (New York: the Free Press, 1991).

    Ian Kershaw, Hitler, the Germans and the Final Solution (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008).

    Kramer, T. D. From Emancipation to Catastrophe: the Rise and Holocaust of Hungarian Jewry (Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 2000).

    Herman Langbein, Against all Hope: Resistance in the Nazi Concentration Camps (New York:

    Paragon, 1994).

    Lawrence Langer, Admitting the Holocaust (New York: Oxford University Press, 1995). Primo Levi, If This is a Man (New York: Orion, 1959

    Abraham Lewin, A Cup of Tears: A Diary of the Warsaw Ghetto (Oxford: Blackwell: 1988). Michael R. Marrus, The Holocaust in History (London: Penguin 1989).. Michael Marrus and Robert Paxton. The Nazis and the Jews in Occupied Western Europe

    1940-1944. Journal of Modern History, 54 (1982): 687-714.

    Bob Moore, Victims and Survivors: The Nazi Persecution of the Jews in the Netherlands, 1940-1945 (London: Arnold, 1997).

    Benno Mller-Hill, Murderous Science: Elimination by Scientific Selection of Jews, Gypsies,

    and Others, Germany 1933-1945. Translated by G. Fraser. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988).

    Guenter Lewy, The Nazi Persecution of the Gypsies Oxford (New York: Oxford University

    Press, 2000).

    Calel Perechodnik, Am I a Murderer? Testament of a Jewish Ghetto Policeman (Oxford: 0Westview Press, 1996).

    Jacob Presser, Ashes in the Wind: The Destruction of Dutch Jewry (London, Souvenir Press,

    1968).

    Richard Rhodes, Masters of Death: The SS-Einsatzgruppen and the Invention of the Holocaust (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2002).

    Jacob Rosenberg, East of Time (N.S.W.: Brandl and Schlesinger, 2005). Karl A. Schleunes, The Twisted Road to Auschwitz: Nazi Policy Toward German Jews 1933-

    1939 (Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1970).

    Wolfgang Sofsky, The Order of Terror: The Concentration Camp (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997).

    Wladyslaw Szpilman, The Pianist : the extraordinary true story of one man's survival in Warsaw, 1939-1945 (New York: Picador, 1999).

    Jonathan Steinberg, All or Nothing: the Axis and the Holocaust, 1941-1943 (New York: Routledge, 1991).

    Alexander Stille, Benevolence and Betrayal: Five Italian Jewish Families Under Fascism (New

    York: Summit Books, 1991).

    Tzvetan Todorov, Facing the Extreme. Moral Life in Concentration Camps (New York: Metropolitan Books, 1996).

  • Page 22 of 27

    Avraham Tory, Surviving the Holocaust: The Kovno Ghetto Diary (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1990).

    Samuel Totten, William S. Parsons and Israel Charny, eds. Century of Genocide, 2d ed. (New

    York: Routledge, 2004).

    Isaish Trunk, Judenrat: The Jewish Councils in Eastern Europe under Nazi Occupation (New York: Macmillan, 1972).

    Paul Webster, Ptains Crime: The Full Story of French Collaboration in the Holocaust (London: Macmillan, 1990).

    John K. Roth Elisabeth Maxwell (eds.), Remembering for the Future: The Holocaust in the Age of Genocide (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2001).

    Elie Wiesel, Night (London: Penguin, 1960). David S. Wyman (ed.), The World Reacts to the Holocaust (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins

    University Press, 1996).

    Leni Yahil, The Holocaust: The Fate of European Jewry 1933-1945 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990).

    Susan Zuccotti, The Holocaust, the French, and the Jews (New York: Basic Books, 1993).

    Good and recent overviews on the Holocaust:Good and recent overviews on the Holocaust:Good and recent overviews on the Holocaust:Good and recent overviews on the Holocaust: David Bankier (ed.), Probing the Depths of German Antisemitism (New York and Oxford:

    Berghahn Books, 2000).

    Richard Bessell, Nazism and War (New York: Modern Library, 2004). Donald Bloxham and Tony Kushner. The Holocaust: Critical Historical Approaches

    (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2005).

    Berel Lang and Simone Gigliotti (eds.), The Holocaust: A Reader (Oxford: Blackwell, 2005). Peter Longerich, The Unwritten Order: Hitlers Role in the Final Solution (London: Tempus,

    2001).

    You should also stay abreast of current events reported in the media which bear on the You should also stay abreast of current events reported in the media which bear on the You should also stay abreast of current events reported in the media which bear on the You should also stay abreast of current events reported in the media which bear on the

    issues of the course.issues of the course.issues of the course.issues of the course.

    This will be of primary importance for class participation and discussion. Suggestions for

    available resources are:

    NewspapersNewspapersNewspapersNewspapers

    The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Sydney Morning Herald; The Australian; Guardian Weekly, Jerusalem Post, Haaretz

    TelevisionTelevisionTelevisionTelevision

    Foreign Correspondent (ABC)

    Four Corners (ABC)

    World News (SBS)

    Dateline (SBS)

    The Cutting Edge (SBS)

    Relevant documentaries (ABC/SBS)

    Important websitesImportant websitesImportant websitesImportant websites

    www.ushmm.org

  • Page 23 of 27

    www.yadvashem.org

    www.yivoencyclopaedia.org

  • Page 24 of 27

    COURSE EVALUATION ANCOURSE EVALUATION ANCOURSE EVALUATION ANCOURSE EVALUATION AND DEVELOPMENTD DEVELOPMENTD DEVELOPMENTD DEVELOPMENT

    Student evaluative feedback on this course is welcomed and is gathered periodically, using

    among other means UNSWs Course and Teaching Evaluation and Improvement (CATEI)

    process.

    Student feedback is taken seriously, and continual improvements are made to the course

    based in part on such feedback. Significant changes to the course will be communicated to

    subsequent cohorts of students taking the course.

    ASSESSMENTASSESSMENTASSESSMENTASSESSMENT

    Assessment is based on one essay, in-class work/participation, and the in-class test on 25

    January.

    In-class work and presentation are meant to stress the students preparation of daily reading

    assignments and to develop their comfort and skill at presenting thoughts in a logical manner

    in front of their peers. The final in-class test is meant to show the students overall command

    of the material and their ability to synthetise that material in assessing the larger themes of

    the course.

    Assessment Assessment Assessment Assessment

    tasktasktasktask

    LengthLengthLengthLength WeightWeightWeightWeight Learning Learning Learning Learning

    outcomes outcomes outcomes outcomes

    assessedassessedassessedassessed

    Graduate Graduate Graduate Graduate

    attributes attributes attributes attributes

    assessedassessedassessedassessed

    Due dateDue dateDue dateDue date

    Tutorial

    presentation

    5-10 minutes 10 % In tutorials

    Class

    participation

    10 % In tutorials

    Essay 2,500 words 40 % 21 January

    2013, 4pm

    Exam 2 hours 40 % 25 January

    2013, 10-

    12pm

    Essay questionsEssay questionsEssay questionsEssay questions (select one)(select one)(select one)(select one)::::

    1) What was the role played by the Jewish Councils in Jewish communities during the

    war?

    2) How did the Final Solution of the Jewish question develop in individual European

    countries? (select one country and discuss specificities)

    3) What was the role played by the Nazi anti-Jewish propaganda in the Final Solution?

    4) The Holocaust was a unique event in human history. Discuss arguments in support and

    against this statement.

  • Page 25 of 27

    5) Was there a genocide or several genocides committed by the Nazis during the war?

    Discuss.

    6) To what extent was the Holocaust determined by those who were not directly involved

    (bystanders)?

    7) What do you understand as Jewish resistance to the Holocaust?

    8) What are the problems concerning the Holocaust representation in film? (Select one or

    more films and discuss).

    9) What can we learn from Allied responses to the Holocaust?

    10) You can also choose your own essay question, but you have to submit it to Jan for

    approval.

    Assignment SubmissionAssignment SubmissionAssignment SubmissionAssignment Submission

    The cut off time for all assignment submissions in the School is 4pm4pm4pm4pm of the stated

    due date (21 January 2013).

    2 assignment copies must be submitted for every assessment task - 1 paper copy

    and 1 electronic copy.

    All hard/paper copy assessments should be posted into the Assignment Drop Boxes

    at the School of Humanities, outside the front counter located at 353, Morven

    Brown Building by 4pm on the due date. A completed cover sheet must be securely

    attached to assignments. The School is not responsible for any missing pages from

    poorly bound or stapled assignments.

    In addition, a soft copy must be sent through Bb9Bb9Bb9Bb9 on TurnitIn by 4pm on the due date.

    ImImImImportant Noteportant Noteportant Noteportant Note

    Electronic copies submitted through TurnitIn will not be marked. Only hard copies

    submitted in the drop boxes will be marked/assessed.

    The electronic copy will be used as evidence of assignment submission during

    appeal and dispute cases. Students have no recourse if a soft copy is not submitted.

    Therefore it is essential that students keep the electronic record of their sent

    assignment.

    Assignment CollectionAssignment CollectionAssignment CollectionAssignment Collection

    Assignments should be collected from your lecturer/tutor and must be collected by the

    owner/author of the assignment. A Stamped Self Addressed Envelope must be provided on

    submission if students require their assignment to be posted back to their home address.

    Assignment ExtensionsAssignment ExtensionsAssignment ExtensionsAssignment Extensions

    A student may apply to the Lecturer/Tutor for an extension to the submission date of an

    assignment. Requests for extension must be made on the appropriate form and before the

  • Page 26 of 27

    submission due date, and must demonstrate exceptional circumstances, which warrant the

    granting of an extension. If medical grounds preclude submission of assignment by due date,

    contact should be made with subject coordinator as soon as possible. A medical certificate will

    be required for late submission and must be appropriate for the extension period.

    Assessment Extension forms are available at the School Office, Level 3, Morven Brown

    Building and online at: http://www.arts.unsw.edu.au/current-students/undergraduate/forms/

    Late Submission of AssignmentsLate Submission of AssignmentsLate Submission of AssignmentsLate Submission of Assignments

    Assignments submitted after the due or extended date will incur a 5% penalty per day including

    weekends (calculated from the maximum marks available for that assignment). Assignments received

    more than 10 calendar days after the due or extended date will not be allocated a mark.

    ATTENDANCEATTENDANCEATTENDANCEATTENDANCE

    To successfully complete this unit you are required to attend minimum 80% of classes. If this

    requirement is not met you will fail the unit. The Lecturer will keep attendance records.

    ACADEMIC HONESTY ANDACADEMIC HONESTY ANDACADEMIC HONESTY ANDACADEMIC HONESTY AND PLAGIARISMPLAGIARISMPLAGIARISMPLAGIARISM

    Students seeking information on plagiarism should visit the following web site:

    http://www.lc.unsw.edu.au/plagiarism/index.html

    OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICYAND SAFETY POLICYAND SAFETY POLICYAND SAFETY POLICY UNSWs Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Policy requires each person to work safely and

    responsibly, in order to avoid personal injury and to protect the safety of others.

    Any OHS concerns should be raised with your immediate supervisor, the Schools OHS representative,

    or the Head of School. The OHS guidelines are available at:

    http://www.ohs.unsw.edu.au/ohs_policies/index.html

    STUDENT EQUITY AND DSTUDENT EQUITY AND DSTUDENT EQUITY AND DSTUDENT EQUITY AND DIVERSITYIVERSITYIVERSITYIVERSITY

    Students who have a disability that requires some adjustment in their learning and teaching

    environment are encouraged to discuss their study needs with the course convener prior to, or

    at the commencement of the course. Alternatively, the Student Equity and Diversity Unit can

    be contacted on 9385 4734. Further information is available at:

    http://www.studentequity.unsw.edu.au

    GRIEVANCES GRIEVANCES GRIEVANCES GRIEVANCES

    All students should be treated fairly in the course of their studies at UNSW. Students who feel

    they have not been dealt with fairly should in the first instance attempt to resolve any issues

    with their tutor or the course convenors. If such an approach fails to resolve the matter, the

    School of Humanities has an academic member of staff who acts as a Grievance Officer for the

    School. This staff member is identified on the notice board in the School of Humanities.

  • Page 27 of 27

    Further information about UNSW grievance procedures is available at:

    https://my.unsw.edu.au/student/atoz/Complaints.html

    OTHER STUDENT INFORMOTHER STUDENT INFORMOTHER STUDENT INFORMOTHER STUDENT INFORMATIONATIONATIONATION

    myUNSW is the single online access point for UNSW services and information, integrating

    online services for applicants, commencing & current students and UNSW staff. To visit

    myUNSW please visit either of the below links:

    https://my.unsw.edu.au

    https://my.unsw.edu.au/student/atoz/ABC.html