Teaching Art - Moore 2014

Download Teaching Art - Moore 2014

Post on 25-Jun-2015

156 views

Category:

Education

4 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Slides from presentation at Moore College of Art, March 3, 2014. Note: Imbedded videos may not play on Slide Share.

TRANSCRIPT

<ul><li> 1. Teaching Art 2014</li></ul> <p> 2. Visual Arts &amp; 21st Century Skills: or how to make yourself the most sought after teacher, ever. 3. You cant just sprinkle 21st century skills on the 20th century doughnut. It requires a fundamental re-conception of what were doing. Christopher Dede, Professor, Harvard Graduate School of Education 4. Creating the 21st. C. Curriculum The Generative Question: What skills &amp; values will be demanded and rewarded in the global 21st C? creativity and innovation facility with the use of ideas and abstractions self-discipline and organization to manage ones own work and drive it through to successful conclusion leadership ability to function well as a member of a team 5. Creating the 21st. C. Curriculum The Generative Question: What skills &amp; values will be demanded and rewarded in the global 21st C? Access and Analyzing Information Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving Ex: Stanford U: Should Google locate its Chinese servers inside or outside of the country? (Multicultural Critical Thinking- In B-School? NYT 01/09/10) Curiosity and Imagination. Collaboration across Networks and Leading by Influence Agility and Adaptability Initiative and Entrepreneurialism Effective Oral and Written Communication;There is no strong evidence that any of the Seven Survival Skills are being taught at any grade level in American public schools. Instead, class time is narrowly focused on teaching only the skills and content that will be tested. (pp 76-77) 6. Creating the 21st. C. Curriculum The Generative Question: What skills &amp; values will be demanded and rewarded in the global 21st C?Multiple Intelligences disciplined mind (expertise in a field) synthesizing mind (scanning, filtering, and weaving into coherence) creating mind (discovery and innovation) respectful mind (open mindedness and inclusiveness) ethical mind i.e., character (moral courage) 7. Twenty-First Century Student Outcomes The elements described in this section as 21st century student outcomes (represented by the rainbow) are the skills, knowledge and expertise students should master to succeed in work and life in the 21st century. 1. Core Subjects and 21st Century Themes 2. Learning and Innovation Skills * Creativity and Innovation * Critical Thinking and Problem Solving * Communication and Collaboration 3. Information, Media and Technology Skills * Information Literacy * Media Literacy * ICT Literacy 4. Life and Career Skills 8. Art as a necessity 9. Temporary Constructs, Oil on Canvas 10. Flirting with Perception, Oil on Canvas 11. A healthy civilization needs an intact living cosmology. By the term cosmology I mean three things: a scientific story about the origins of our universe; mysticism that is a psychic response to our being in the universe; and art, which translates science and mysticism into images that awaken body, soul, and society. A cosmology needs all three elements to come alive: it is our joyful response (mysticism) to the awesome fact of our being in the universe (science) and our expression of that response by the art of our lives and citizenship (art). When a civilization is without a cosmology it is not only cosmically violent, but cosmically lonely and depressed. Matthew Fox 12. What I was taught. 13. The Academic Standards for the Arts and Humanities 9.1. Production, Performance and Exhibition of Dance, Music, Theatre and Visual Arts 9.2. Historical and Cultural Contexts 9.3. Critical Response 9.4. Aesthetic Response 14. A Different Way of ApproachingVisual Art 15. Marginal to CentralSuperfluous to EssentialIntuitive to Intentional 16. Painting Drawing Sculpture Ceramics Computer Graphics Photography Film/VideoSeeing Visual Language Creative Process Connectedness 17. Seeing 18. Matilda 1996-2009 19. Tubes 20. The McGurk Effect 21. quiz 22. John James Audubon, Purple Grackle, Watercolor 23. Crawford Greenwalt, Hummingbird, electronic flash photo 24. Visual Language 25. Chauvet Pont dArc Cave, Ardche, France 26. The Bronocice pot is a ceramic vase incised with the earliest known image of what may be a wheeled vehicle. It was dated by the radiocarbon method to 3635-3370 BC 27. How many times does the team in white pass the ball? 28. Creative Process 29. Ingvar Kamprad 30. What is creativity?gift 31. J.P. Guilford (1897-1987) United States psychologist, best remembered for his psychometric study of human intelligence, including the distinction between convergent and divergent production. 32. Characteristics of Divergent thinking:fluency (the ability to produce great number of ideas or problem solutions in a short period of time);flexibility (the ability to simultaneously propose a variety of approaches to a specific problem);originality (the ability to produce new, original ideas); elaboration (the ability to systematize and organize the details of an idea in a head and carry it out). 33. C8H11NO2 - Dopamine 34. The principle goal of education is to create men who are capable of doing new things, not simply of repeating what other generations have done men who are creative, inventive and discoverers. Jean Piaget (1896 1980) Swiss developmental psychologist/ biologist, developer of genetic epistemology 35. Connectedness 36. Everything that is in the heavens, on the earth, and under the earth is penetrated with connectedness, is penetrated with relatedness. Hildegard of Bingen 1098 1179 37. "When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe. John Muir 38. Intuitive to Intentional 39. Line Drawing Project Challenge:Can you create an interesting graphite pencil drawing that describes various aspects of your chosen small object using a variety of line qualities? 40. Art Elements The most basic building blocks of the Visual LanguageLine, Texture, Value, Shape, Form, Space, ColorLine is a mark that spans a distance between two points or a continuous mark made by a point, taking any form along the way. As an art element, line pertains to the use of various marks, outlines and implied lines used to describe edges, boundaries and contours of shapes and forms 41. What is a line? What do artists use the line for? What is abstraction? What does it mean to describe something? How can line be varied to describe different kinds of edges, surfaces and materials? How will we know if our work is successful? Lines are abstract devices artists use to describe edges, boundaries and textures. Based on an individual artists experiences their description of something might vary from another artists. Lines can have a range of line qualities to create interest and be descriptive. Light/dark, thick/thin, crisp/sketchy, etc.. 42. About 32,000 years ago, in a limestone cave above the Ardche River in Southern France, humans created the oldest cave paintings known to exist. 43. Cave hyena and the panther: painting found in the Chauvet cave:the spots on the panther represent a feline coat 44. The Bronocice pot is a ceramic vase incised with the earliest known image of what may be a wheeled vehicle. It was dated by the radiocarbon method to 3635-3370 BC[1] and is attributed to the Funnelbeaker archaeological culture. Today it is housed in the Archaeological Museum in Krakw, Poland. 45. Warka Vase, Sumarian, 3100 BCE 46. Theseus slays the Minotaur, while Athena looks on, Greek platter, about 425 BC 47. Portrait of Barbara Drer, ne Holper, attributed to Albrecht Drer, c 1490. Oil on oak Panel, 47 cm x 36 cm. 48. Michelangelo Buonarroti, Study for Adam, c1510-11, 19.3 x 25.9cm, Study for the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel 49. Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti, The Creation of Adam, Sistine Chapel Ceiling, c1511, Fresco 50. Pablo Picasso. Portrait of Igor Stravinsky. 1920. Graphite and charcoal. 51. Pablo Picasso, Portrait of Gertrude Stein, 1906 52. Bernard Kliban 1935 90 53. Why? 54. Foveal System vs Peripheral systems. Why might this pertain? 55. Ilya Repin, An Unexpected Visitor, 1884. 56. Yarbus, A.F. (1967) Eye Movements and Vision, New York, Plenum Press.Alfred L. Yarbus, Eye Movements and Vision, trans. Basil Haigh (New York: Plenum Press, 1967) 57. Yarbus, A.F. (1967) Eye Movements and Vision, New York, Plenum Press.Alfred L. Yarbus, Eye Movements and Vision, trans. Basil Haigh (New York: Plenum Press, 1967) 58. From a study of speed reading made by Humanistlaboratoriet, Lund University, in 2005. 59. Describe this object 60. Project Challenge: Can you create an interesting graphite pencil drawing that describes various aspects of your chosen small object using a variety of line qualities? 61. Student Generated Success Rubric 62. Project Challenge: Can you create an interesting graphite pencil drawing that describes various aspects of your chosen small object using a variety of line qualities? 63. Color Light &amp; Shade 64. Additive (light) vs Subtractive (pigment/paint) Color 65. White Light White Light 66. Red Light 67. Local color refers to the natural color of an object unmodified by adding light and shadow or any other distortion. 68. Tonal Color refers to the apparent variations in color resulting from the effects of light and shade. 69. Shade and shadows are darker more neutral versions of the local color, why? 70. LIGHTRods &amp; Cones 71. The rods are most sensitive to light and dark changes, shape and movement and contain only one type of light-sensitive pigment. Rods are not good for color vision. In a dim room, however, we use mainly our rods, but we are "color blind." Rods are more numerous than cones in the periphery of the retina. 72. The cones are not as sensitive to light as the rods. However, cones are most sensitive to one of three different colors (green, red or blue). Signals from the cones are sent to the brain which then translates these messages into the perception of color. Cones, however, work only in bright light. That's why you cannot see color very well in dark places. 73. Claude Monet. Haystack. End of the Summer. Morning. 1891 74. "Wheatstacks (End of Summer)" [1890-1891] by Claude Monet 75. Can you create a still life with at least two color objects and two background colors where at least one shadow is cast across the two background colors? You may not use black. 76. Complex Interior Space Drawing 77. Complex Interior Space Can you develop a drawing describing a complex, interior space (from observation) that still invites, even entices, the viewer to travel into the deepest part of the space? Use as many spatial illusion devices as necessary. Use visual attractors to pull the viewer into and through the space. Use composition to focus viewers attention. 78. Spatial Rendering Devices: Change of Scale Overlapping Relative Position in the Field Linear (Renaissance) Perspective Atmospheric Perspective 79. Visual Attractors and Directors: Details, dense bits of information Strong Contrast Human Figure - Face - Eye Window &amp; Doorways Pathways &amp; Perspective Arrows and Pointing Shapes The human gaze A sequence of objects, breadcrumbs Compositional Devices: Rule of Thirds, Golden Mean, Fibonacci Spiral 80. VELAZQUEZ, Diego, Las Meninas, 1656, Oil on canvas 81. Jan Vermeer, The Art of Painting, c. 1666-1673, Oil on canvas 82. Caravaggio, Doubting Thomas, 1573-1610, oil on canvas, 1602-1603 83. Golden Section Diagonals 84. Rule of Thirds 85. Fibonacci Spiral 86. Golden Section Spiral 87. Why does placing an area of interest away from the center make it more visually interesting? 88. Foveal System vs Peripheral systems. Why might this pertain? 89. Yarbus, A.F. (1967) Eye Movements and Vision, New York, Plenum Press. 90. Yarbus, A.F. (1967) Eye Movements and Vision, New York, Plenum Press. 91. George Tooker, Bird Watchers, 1948 92. George Tooker, The Waiting Room, 1959, egg tempera on wood 93. George Tooker, Government Bureau, 1956 94. George Tooker, Subway, 1950 95. ArronS.jpg 96. Intuitive to Intentional 97. Connectedness 98. Pablo Picasso, Guernica, 1937 99. Nature Morte avec Verre et Citron (1910) 100. Guerrilla War It's practically impossible to tell civilians from the Viet Cong. Nobody wears uniforms. They all talk the same language (and you couldn't understand them even if they didn't). They tape grenades inside their clothes, and carry satchel charges in their market baskets. Even their women fight. And young boys. And girls. It's practically impossible to tell civilians from the Viet Cong. After awhile, you quit trying. Copyright 1975 by W. D. Ehrhart A Generation of Peace, New Voices Publishing Company, 1975 This poem is currently published in Beautiful Wreckage, New &amp; Selected Poems, Adastra Press, 1999 101. William Ehrhardt, Guerrilla War 102. The Bombing of Himmel Street, excerpt from The Book Thief by Markus Zusak 103. Learning to See more powerfully, intentionally, and critically.Becoming more fluent in the Visual Language. Communicating more effectively through our use of line, color, shape, value, form and other visual elements. Learning how to read images and forms.Mastering the Creative Process. Becoming more comfortable taking risks, stepping outside of our comfort zone and making mistakes. Learning to solve problems, work from our own ideas, and to deal with the frustrations of making something new.Developing a Connected and Interdisciplinary approach to learning. 104. Christopher Fox Visual Art Chair The Haverford Schoolcfox@haverford.org</p>