led chess set

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Now you can play chess in the dark.

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  • http://www.instructables.com/id/LED-Chess-Set/

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    LED Chess Setby Tetranitrate on April 23, 2008

    Table of Contents

    LED Chess Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

    Intro: LED Chess Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

    Step 1: How it works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

    Step 2: Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

    Step 3: Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

    Step 4: Starting the copper plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

    Step 5: Drilling the copper plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

    Step 6: Making the board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

    Step 7: Wiring the board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

    Step 8: Starting the box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

    Step 9: Wiring the Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

    Step 10: Finalize the box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

    Step 11: Preparing the pieces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

    Step 12: Making the pieces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

    Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

    Comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

  • http://www.instructables.com/id/LED-Chess-Set/

    Author:TetranitrateI'm attending Polytechnic Institute of NYU.

    Intro: LED Chess Set..................................................................................................................................................................................

    It all started with an idea I had many years ago.

    I had just picked up a cheap-o glass chess set at my local arcade for the low low price of only 15,000 tickets. The novelty of playing with glass pieces quickly wore off,and I wondered how I could make it better. The thought of illuminating the set seemed very appealing, but there were so many different ways that could be done.

    I could put alternating colored lights under the board following the checkerboard pattern. The light would shine up through the glass board and make the pieces glow. Theproblem with this design is that the pieces would change color with each move, and (since the difference between the two sides is not black / white but frosted / clear)this would make game play somewhat confusing.

    I could put a small battery and light inside of each piece, so the two sides would each be different colors. This would probably be the simplest way to get glowing pieces;however, this design is not without its problems. The batteries would need to be replaced. Their lifespan could be extended if a small sensitive on/off switch, activated bythe chess piece being in an upright position, were added. This would complicate the design though, and still only be a temporary solution, as the batteries would need tobe replaced eventually. This design (with the switch) does have one more advantage. It gives the chess pieces two states, on and off. I liked the idea of the chess piecesbeing illuminated while they were in play (upright and on the board), and dark while they were out (dead and off the board).The final design I chose (which will be explained in more depth in the next step), was to have each piece contain an LED that would be powered by a conductive board.The board is plugged into an outlet, so there is no need to worry about the power running out. While the pieces are on the board they are "live" and illuminated, and whileoff the board they are "dead" and dark.

    I made a stop motion animation of game six between Kasparov and Deep Blue . The animation does not end with checkmate, because when Kasparov saw that he wasgoing to be beaten by a computer, he threw a hissy fit and stormed off.

  • http://www.instructables.com/id/LED-Chess-Set/

    Step 1: How it worksSixteen blue LEDs and sixteen green LEDs are glued inside the hollow recesses in the base of each chess piece. The positive contacts for the LEDs are wired to copperwashers attached to the base of each chess piece. The negative contacts for the LEDs are clipped to be made flush with the rest of the base.

    A conductive chessboard is made from a sheet of copper. The sheet is wired to the positive lead from a power transformer. Insulated holes through the center of eachsquare on the board allow magnets to pass through. The magnets connect and hold a negatively wired steel plate underneath to the negative leads from the LEDs.

    Step 2: MaterialsThis project uses a wide range of materials and tools, so I separated the two lists into individual steps.The materials include:

    Glass chess set - I got mine at Walgreens. It was a two for $10 deal. I bought a couple so if I broke some of the pieces I would have extra. The chess pieces shouldhave a small cavity in the bottom covered by some circular felt stickers, to prevent them from scratching the glass chess board.

    LEDs - Twenty 5mm blue and twenty 5mm green LEDs. I ordered mine from superbrightleds.com .

    Magnets - I used 1/8" tall 1/16" diameter cylindrical neodymium magnets. Since three were used in each square on the board, 192 were needed all together. Of coursethe magnets could be 3/8" tall and only 64 would be needed.

    Wood - A thin sheet (~1/4" thick) with the same area as the copper plate, used both as an insulator and as a structural backing for the copper. Thicker pieces of woodare also needed to make the final box / enclosure for the chess board, but the dimensions do not matter too much, as almost any scrap wood will do.

    Copper plate - A square copper sheet around 1/16" or 1/32" thick, and with an area at least that the size of the original chess board. I found mine on Ebay.

    Copper washers - The outer circumference should be the same size as the outer circumference of the base of the chess pieces. The inner diameter is not as important,but should be large enough to easily wire an LED through.

    Steel plate - Should be exactly the same dimensions (length and width, thickness doesn't matter too much, but around 1/16" or 1/32" would be ideal) as the originalchess board (only the 8 x 8 grid of squares, not counting any extra border). If each square on the chess board is 1" by 1", then the steel plate should be 8" by 8".Copper foil tape - Again the exact specs change depending on the size of your chess board, but a few feet (~6') of tape should be good. The width of the tape should behalf the width of one square on the chess board (1" chess board squares = 1/2" copper foil tape)Acrylic sheets - It doesn't really need to be acrylic, but that was the building material available to me at the time. One square will be to sandwich the steel and copperplates together, and to hold the wires in place. The other square I used as a bottom to the chess board box.

    Power supply - I used a wall wart with a 120V AC input and 3V 300mA DC output to power the chess board.

    Gaffers tape - To tape stuff in place

    Glue / epoxy - To hol

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