Aristotle’s Three Types of Persuasive Rhetoric Logos Ethos Pathos

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Aristotles Three Types of Persuasive Rhetoric Logos Ethos Pathos </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> What is rhetoric? Rhetoric is the skillful use of language. The goal of persuasion is to change others point of view or to move others to take action. Precise, thoughtful, purposeful language and images are tools for persuasion/argument. </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> What are logos, ethos, and pathos? Logos = Logic Ethos = Ethics, Image Pathos = Emotions (Passion) </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> The rhetorical triangle is typically represented by an equilateral triangle, suggesting that logos, ethos, and pathos should be balanced within a text. However, which aspect(s) of the rhetorical triangle you favor in your writing depends on both the audience and the purpose of that writing. Yet, if you are in doubt, seek a balance among all three elements. Logos (reason/text) Ethos Pathos (credibility/writer) (values,emotions,audience) </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Logos Logos is an argument based on facts, evidence and reason. Using logos means appealing to the readers sense of what is logical. Logos appeals to reason. Logos can also be thought of as the text of the argument, as well as how well a writer has argued his/her point. </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Ethos Ethos is an argument based on character. Using ethos means the writer or speaker appeals to the audiences sense of ethical behavior. The writer or speaker presents him or herself to the audience as credible, trustworthy, honest and ethical. Ethos can also be thought of as the role of the writer in the argument, and how credible his/her argument is. I am an ethical expert, so believe what I say. </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Pathos Pathos = argument based on feelings Pathos appeals to the emotions and the sympathetic imagination, as well as to beliefs and values. Pathos can also be thought of as the role of the audience in the argument. </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Logos </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Ethos </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Pathos </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> The rhetorical triangle is typically represented by an equilateral triangle, suggesting that logos, ethos, and pathos should be balanced within a text. However, which aspect(s) of the rhetorical triangle you favor in your writing depends on both the audience and the purpose of that writing. Yet, if you are in doubt, seek a balance among all three elements. Logos (reason/text) Ethos Pathos (credibility/writer) (values,emotions,audience) </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Analyzing Logos: Is the thesis clear and specific? Is the thesis supported by strong reasons and credible evidence? Is the argument logical and arranged in a well-reasoned order? Ethos: What are the writers qualifications? How has the writer connected him/herself to the topic being discussed? Does the writer demonstrate respect for multiple viewpoints by using sources in the text? Are sources credible? Are sources documented appropriately? Does the writer use a tone that is suitable for the audience/purpose? Is the diction (word choice) used appropriate for the audience/purpose? Is the document presented in a polished and professional manner? Pathos: Are vivid examples, details and images used to engage the readers emotions and imagination? Does the writer appeal to the values and beliefs of the reader by using examples readers can relate to or care about? </li> </ul>