analyse richard meier

1
Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art Building analysis Architect Realized works Richard Meier BIOGRAPHY Richard Meier was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1934. Richard Meier graduated from Cornell University in 1957 then worked with a series of architects, including Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill and Marcel Breuer. Richard Meier established his own practice in 1963. His practice has included housing and private residences, museums, high-tech and medical facilities, commercial buildings and such major civic commissions as courthouses and city halls in the United States and Europe: Among his most well- known projects are the High Museum in Atlanta; the Frankfurt Museum for Decorative Arts In Germany; Canal+ Television Headquarters in Paris; the Hartford Seminary In Connecticut; the Atheneun in New Harmony, Indiana, and the Bronx Developmental Center in New York. All of these have received National Honor Awards from the American Institute of Architects (AIA). In 1984, Mr. Richard Meier was awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize, considered the field’s highest honor and often equated with the Nobel Prize. In the same year, Mr. Richard Meier was selected architect for the prestigious commission to design the new $1 billion Getty Center in Los Angeles, California. Ching Clark & Pause Steadman Form Operation Performance C onclusion Richard Meier has maintained a specific and unalterable attitude toward the design of buildings from the moment Richard Meier first entered architecture. Although his later projects show a definite refinement from his earlier projects, Richard Meier clearly authored both based on the same design concepts. With admirable consistency and dedication, Richard Meier has ignored the fashion trends of modern architecture and maintained his own design philosophy. Richard Meier has created a series of striking, but related designs. Richard Meier usually designs white Neo-Corbusian forms with enameled panels and glass. These structure usually play with the linear relationships of ramps and handrails. Although all have a similar look, Richard Meier manages to generate endless variations on his singular theme. Source: http://architect.architecture.sk/richard-meier-architect/richard-meier-architect.php THEMATICS The three of the most significant concepts of Richard Meier ‘s work are Light, Color and Place. His architecture shows how plain geometry, layered definition of spaces and effects of light and shade, allow Richard Meier to create clear and comprehensible spaces. The main issue Richard Meier is focusing on as an architect, is what Richard Meier termed placeness: “What is it that makes a space a place.” According to Richard Meier there are ten factors that connect a building to its environment, one or more of which must be present for a space to be a place: factors which cause the Mode of Being; those which emphasize the presence of the building as an independent object; factors which emphasize the presence of the building in its given environment; those which encourage fantasy and play; factors which encourage ecstatic exuberance; factors which preserve a sense of mystery and adventure; ingredients which connect us to reality; those which link the building to its past; facilitate spontaneous exchanges; and affirm people’s identity. Source: http://architect.architecture.sk/richard-meier-architect/richard-meier-architect.php Frankfurt Museum for the Decor. Arts, 1979 Canal + Headquarters, 1988 United States Courthouse, Islip, 1993 Neugebauer House, 1995 173 - 176 Perry Street Condoleum, 1999 Jubilee Church Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art, 1987 South elevation North elevation Ground floor plan Section through rotunda A-A Second floor plan Section through typical gallaries B-B Ground floor plan First floor plan North section B-B East section A-A Jubilee Church, 1996 Spatial relations Approach, frontal Adjecent Interlocking A B C D E F G H A A A E E F F C C B B H D D G G Circulation elements Circulation elements Spatial organizations, linear Form compositions Approach, frontal Approach, frontal Approach, frontal Spatial relations Form compositions A B C D E F A A C C F F E E D D B B B B B B Circulation elements Circulation elements Spatial organizations, linear Structure Parti Massing Repetitive to unique Plan to section Hierarchy Geometry Symmetry and balance A B C D F G E A B C D F G E H I J K L A B C D E F I J F H G Ground floor plan First floor plan Second floor plan Ground floor plan First floor plan Second floor plan B C D F E A H I J K G Structure Natural light Plan to section Massing Chris Schilder 4076273 Albert Mark 4076257 Werner Huizing 4064658 Marcel Mataheru 4064496 Theo Weijs 4064666 B B A A B B A A B B A A B B A A Adjecent Unit to whole Circulation to use Natural light Additive and subtractive Unit to whole Circulation to use-space Parti Repetitive to unique Geometry Symmetry and ballance Hierarchy Additive and subtractive Douglas House, 1971 E K M N O L E F P M N O P L B C D F E A H I J K G M N O P L A. Corridor B. Employee rooms C. Exposition space D. Exposition space E. Staircase F. Staircase H I J K A. Staircase B. Church hall C. Staircase D. Hall/Corridor E. Office F. Hall G. Kitchen/toilets J G F E H C A B A B H I J K H L F orm O peration P erformance MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART The museum in Barcelona is a unique case in a sense. For a museum light is a natural enemy. Sensitive artwork must be protected from harmful uv- radiation. Therefore the light is always indirect. By placing horizontal panels on the façade Richard Meier creates the illusion of ‘horizontal’ sunrays. As the day progresses the angle of the light changes, giving a very dynamic effect without threatening the delicate art. In the case of the museum of contemporary art the color works great because it doesn’t distract from the featuring art. It’s a very neutral color which works well with the play of light which occurs during the day. In the museum several different things happen. Some spaces are defined by their geometry. Others are defined by entering light or half panels. The circular exhibition space and the extruded free-form exhibition space are clearly defined by their geometry and placement. In the main part of the building spaces are defined by entering light and panels which create ‘semi-closed’ spaces COMPARISON LIGHT Richard Meier is known for his use of dynamic light. In the two analyzed projects we see two very different ways of using it. COLOR When faced with the oeuvre of Richard Meier one immediately notices one thing: the color. White is the most pre-dominant color used by Richard Meier. PLACE The third theme of Richard Meier is place. Or maybe better, the things that make a space a place. CHURCH OF THE YEAR 2000 The church is at the opposite end of the possibilities of light. The use of light in the church is more straightforward. The light enters vertically and direct. In contrary to the museum the light is a natural friend to the church. It’s use creates a divine atmosphere suitable for contemplation and prayer. In the church, the color works well for a different reason. White has always been associated with the divine, with cleanliness and serenity. Combined with the direct light and the open space plan the color creates a sense of ‘heaven on earth’. In contrast to the museum the spaces are not closed by panels. Instead the space breaks through their geometric shapes. The panels still serve to define different areas, but not different spaces. CONCLUSION In conclusion one can say that Richard Meier is a man who stands by his themes. He elegantly shows how a small set of principals can be used in very different ways and produce two unique buildings while retaining the obvious hand of the architect. Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art has has has Affords Affords has has has A B C A B C A B C A B C A B C A B C has F orm O peration P erformance has has has Affords Affords Jubilee Church A E F C B H D G B F E D A C G. Corridor H Employee rooms I. Exposition space J. Exposition space K. Exposition space L. Corridor M Employee rooms N.Exposition space O. Exposition space P. Exposition space B C D F E A G A. Corridor B. Employee rooms C. Exposition space D. Exposition space E. Staircase F. Staircase G. Exposition space Conclusion A B C D E F G H Hall I. Office J. Hall K. Auditorium L L. Office F E H C A B Conclusion A B C D F E A. Staircase B. Church hall C. Staircase D. Hall/Corridor E. Office F. Hall / kitchen / toilets

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Page 1: Analyse Richard Meier

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ksRichard MeierBIOGRAPHYRichard Meier was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1934. Richard Meier graduated from Cornell University in 1957 then worked with a series of architects, including Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill and Marcel Breuer. Richard Meier established his own practice in 1963.His practice has included housing and private residences, museums, high-tech and medical facilities, commercial buildings and such major civic commissions as courthouses and city halls in the United States and Europe: Among his most well-known projects are the High Museum in Atlanta; the Frankfurt Museum for Decorative Arts In Germany; Canal+ Television Headquarters in Paris; the Hartford Seminary In Connecticut; the Atheneun in New Harmony, Indiana, and the Bronx Developmental Center in New York. All of these have received National Honor Awards from the American Institute of Architects (AIA).In 1984, Mr. Richard Meier was awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize, considered the field’s highest honor and often equated with the Nobel Prize. In the same year, Mr. Richard Meier was selected architect for the prestigious commission to design the new $1 billion Getty Center in Los Angeles, California.

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Richard Meier has maintained a specific and unalterable attitude toward the design of buildings from the moment Richard Meier first entered architecture. Although his later projects show a definite refinement from his earlier projects, Richard Meier clearly authored both based on the same design concepts. With admirable consistency and dedication, Richard Meier has ignored the fashion trends of modern architecture and maintained his own design philosophy. Richard Meier has created a series of striking, but related designs. Richard Meier usually designs white Neo-Corbusian forms with enameled panels and glass. These structure usually play with the linear relationships of ramps and handrails. Although all have a similar look, Richard Meier manages to generate endless variations on his singular theme.

Source: http://architect.architecture.sk/richard-meier-architect/richard-meier-architect.php

THEMATICSThe three of the most significant concepts of Richard Meier ‘s work are Light, Color and Place. His architecture shows how plain geometry, layered definition of spaces and effects of light and shade, allow Richard Meier to create clear and comprehensible spaces. The main issue Richard Meier is focusing on as an architect, is what Richard Meier termed placeness: “What is it that makes a space a place.” According to Richard Meier there are ten factors that connect a building to its environment, one or more of which must be present for a space to be a place: factors which cause the Mode of Being; those which emphasize the presence of the building as an independent object; factors which emphasize the presence of the building in its given environment; those which encourage fantasy and play; factors which encourage ecstatic exuberance; factors which preserve a sense of mystery and adventure; ingredients which connect us to reality; those which link the building to its past; facilitate spontaneous exchanges; and affirm people’s identity.

Source: http://architect.architecture.sk/richard-meier-architect/richard-meier-architect.php

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South elevation North elevation

Ground floor plan

Section through rotunda A-A

Second floor plan

Section through typical gallaries B-B

Ground floor plan First floor plan

North section B-BEast section A-A

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Spatial relations Approach, frontal

AdjecentInterlocking

A B C D E F G H

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B

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D

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Circulation elements

Circulation elementsSpatial organizations, linear Form compositionsApproach, frontal

Approach, frontal

Approach, frontal

Spatial relations

Form compositions

A B C D E F

A

A

C

C

F

FE

E

D

D

B

B

B

B

BB

Circulation elements

Circulation elementsSpatial organizations, linear

Structure

Parti

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Repetitive to uniquePlan to section

HierarchyGeometry

Symmetry and balance

A B

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D F GE

A B

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D F GE

H I J K

L

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B

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Ground floor plan First floor plan Second floor plan

Ground floor plan First floor plan Second floor plan

B C

D

F E

A

H I

J

K

G

Structure

Natural light

Plan to section

Massing

Chris Schilder 4076273Albert Mark 4076257

Werner Huizing 4064658Marcel Mataheru 4064496

Theo Weijs 4064666

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Adjecent

Unit to whole

Circulation to useNatural light Additive and subtractive

Unit to whole

Circulation to use-space

Parti

Repetitive to unique

Geometry

Symmetry and ballance

Hierarchy

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A. CorridorB. Employee roomsC. Exposition spaceD. Exposition spaceE. StaircaseF. Staircase

H I J KA. StaircaseB. Church hallC. StaircaseD. Hall/CorridorE. OfficeF. HallG. Kitchen/toilets

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Form Operation Performance

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART

The museum in Barcelona is a unique case in a sense. For a museum light is a natural enemy. Sensitive artwork must be protected from harmful uv-radiation. Therefore the light is always indirect. By placing horizontal panels on the façade Richard Meier creates the illusion of ‘horizontal’ sunrays.

As the day progresses the angle of the light changes, giving a very dynamic effect without threatening the delicate art.

In the case of the museum of contemporary art the color works great because it doesn’t distract from the featuring art. It’s a very neutral color which works well with the play of light which occurs during the day.

In the museum several different things happen. Some spaces are defined by their geometry. Others are defined by entering light or half panels. The circular exhibition space and the extruded free-form exhibition space are clearly defined by their geometry and placement. In the main part of the

building spaces are defined by entering light and panels which create ‘semi-closed’ spaces

COMPARISON

LIGHTRichard Meier is known for his use of dynamic light. In the two analyzed projects we see two very different ways of using it.

COLORWhen faced with the oeuvre of Richard Meier one immediately notices one thing: the color. White is the most pre-dominant color used by Richard

Meier.

PLACEThe third theme of Richard Meier is place. Or maybe better, the things that make a space a place.

CHURCH OF THE YEAR 2000

The church is at the opposite end of the possibilities of light. The use of light in the church is more straightforward. The light enters vertically and direct. In contrary to the museum the light is a natural friend to the church. It’s use creates a divine atmosphere suitable for contemplation and prayer.

In the church, the color works well for a different reason. White has always been associated with the divine, with cleanliness and serenity. Combined with the direct light and the open space plan the color creates a sense of ‘heaven on earth’.

In contrast to the museum the spaces are not closed by panels. Instead the space breaks through their geometric shapes. The panels still serve to define different areas, but not different spaces.

CONCLUSIONIn conclusion one can say that Richard Meier is a man who stands by his themes. He elegantly shows how a small set of principals can be used in very

different ways and produce two unique buildings while retaining the obvious hand of the architect.

Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art

hashashasAffords Affords

has hashas

A B C A B C A B C A B C A B C A B C

has

Form Operation Performance

hashashasAffords Affords

Jubilee Church

A

E F

CB

H

D

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B

FEDA

C

G. CorridorH Employee roomsI. Exposition spaceJ. Exposition spaceK. Exposition space

L. CorridorM Employee roomsN.Exposition spaceO. Exposition spaceP. Exposition space

C D

F

B

A

Conclusion

E G

B C

D

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A. CorridorB. Employee roomsC. Exposition spaceD. Exposition spaceE. StaircaseF. StaircaseG. Exposition space

Conclusion

A

B C D

E FG

H HallI. OfficeJ. HallK. Auditorium

LL. Office

G

F

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H

BA

F

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Conclusion

A B

C

D FE A. StaircaseB. Church hallC. StaircaseD. Hall/CorridorE. OfficeF. Hall / kitchen / toilets