5 Key Takeaways For Brand Marketers - Mobile World Congress 2016 - Day 4

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  • 5 Key Takeaways For Brand Marketers Mobile World Congress 2016 Day 4

  • Mobile levels the playing field for developing economiesEntrepreneurs from all over the globe will soon be partners

    Mobile levels the playing field in a global economy. We need to think broader than our existing markets.

    At MWC mobile payments provider Stripe launched Atlas, a beta product designed to help entrepreneurs in developing markets gain access to the same business infrastructure enjoyed by those in the Western world. Stripes focus is to level the uneven playing field, a field in which startups outside of the G20 are often excluded from the international banking system and cannot accept payments in different currencies. Stripe Atlas is designed to get around the problem of the time and resources it takes to incorporate a company in the US or Europe. It will provide newly-established businesses with US bank accounts, along with standardized paperwork and free consultancy advice.Companies that sign up with Stripe can be accepting payments within a matter of days, as well as the ability to charge customers anywhere in the world, using Stripes technology.

    Jill Cress of MasterCard spoke of their push to empower citizens who are trying to get into the formal financial economy, using mobile as a platform for social inclusion for developing nations. Their goal is to bring 500 million people into the financial services economy by 2020.

    *

  • The Internet of Things is definitely A ThingWatch for new consumer habits around connected devices

    Photo credit: irishtimes.com

    Every device on show at MWC was a connected device, from phones and tablets to cars, umbrellas, a smart robot powered by IBMs Watson (seen on this slide), dog collars, bikes, shoes, even smart wine cellars. The Internet of Things (IoT) is certainly and clearly our future. Experts estimate that the IoT will consist of almost 50 billion objects by 2020.

    However, we should expect a wait before we walk into our homes and our fridge and microwave are collaborating on whats for dinner. The tech industry is still figuring out how to make all the devices play nice together, something called device interoperability. There are several consortiums focused on creating common standards so that all devices can interconnect and work harmoniously as one.

    This lack of loyalty to one common manufacturing standard for connected devices is one of the barriers holding back mass adoption in the UK, Europe and America. The IoT will only have reached critical mass when third-parties are able to connect to these products and offer new services. Marketers should watch, learn, be curious and follow tech updates in this space and track them back to how people are engaging with the tech around them, so that our customer journey planning is always built in tandem with evolutions in human behavior.*

  • Our phones are a reflection of our preferencesSoon we will be using them for identification too

    Photo credit The Verge

    With the huge increase in devices connected to the internet, comes a huge increase in devices that can be hacked. Security of web-enabled devices is another big issue facing the industry as a whole and one of the next hurdles to be overcome in the years to come. There have been some really interesting steps forward in the convergence of the mobile devices we all use, and the problems we are trying to fix. The selfie common place in our lives, at times seemingly ridiculous but could also be the future of biometrics.

    Mobile security firm Morpho is backing biometrics and facial recognition in particular, to make an impact on smartphone security over the next 12 months. The company expects biometrics capability on smartphones to become standard in the year to come, as it provides a unique combination of security and convenience for the user. This is a push for biometrics to replace passwords for unlocking phones and accessing services. It includes capabilities such as liveness detection to ensure that the image being captured is from a live person and not from a photo. MasterCard launched a trial of selfies and fingerprints for verifying transactions in 2015 and at MWC said it plans to bring "selfie pay" security checks to more than a dozen countries. *

  • Consumers are not all opposed to paid ads on mobile Create a better experience with utility & rewards

    Mobile advertising needs to offer convenience and utility

    There are 3.7 billion mobile phones around the world today. There will be 6.5 billion by 2020. On average we spend 11 hours a day with our mobile device, on top of all the other media we use. Mobile changes how people behave, think, how they expect brands to engage with them. They will expect more scale, personalization and global reach

    They are also not totally anti being advertised to on their mobile device. We need to be laser focused on the experience that they are having when on it. Give the consumer a reason to opt in they will accept a value exchange if there is indeed value in it for them. Create a better experience for people in a mobile environment using utility and reward (For example, I will sign up for push notifications from Airbnb if it makes my next stay at an Airbnb easier with pre-arrival details)*

  • Mobile is more than just a marketing platformWe need to keep pace with the power & connectivity it brings

    Photo credit: mobilemarketingmagazine.com

    Marketers have to stitch it all together for the end consumer.

    We need to stop thinking of mobile experiences as just a marketing platform. The most powerful device in your hands is an everything platform, from media to commerce to utility and back again. Just look to mobile payments to see how speed, immediacy and ease of use has been transformative to an industry.

    Brand marketers need to think about the device in the hands of the consumer and keep up with the power, pace, freedom and connectivity that consumers are now enjoying.*

  • ThanksThats all for this year!

    *

    Mobile levels the playing field in a global economy. We need to think broader than our existing markets.

    At MWC mobile payments provider Stripe launched Atlas, a beta product designed to help entrepreneurs in developing markets gain access to the same business infrastructure enjoyed by those in the Western world. Stripes focus is to level the uneven playing field, a field in which startups outside of the G20 are often excluded from the international banking system and cannot accept payments in different currencies. Stripe Atlas is designed to get around the problem of the time and resources it takes to incorporate a company in the US or Europe. It will provide newly-established businesses with US bank accounts, along with standardized paperwork and free consultancy advice.Companies that sign up with Stripe can be accepting payments within a matter of days, as well as the ability to charge customers anywhere in the world, using Stripes technology.

    Jill Cress of MasterCard spoke of their push to empower citizens who are trying to get into the formal financial economy, using mobile as a platform for social inclusion for developing nations. Their goal is to bring 500 million people into the financial services economy by 2020.

    *Photo credit: irishtimes.com

    Every device on show at MWC was a connected device, from phones and tablets to cars, umbrellas, a smart robot powered by IBMs Watson (seen on this slide), dog collars, bikes, shoes, even smart wine cellars. The Internet of Things (IoT) is certainly and clearly our future. Experts estimate that the IoT will consist of almost 50 billion objects by 2020.

    However, we should expect a wait before we walk into our homes and our fridge and microwave are collaborating on whats for dinner. The tech industry is still figuring out how to make all the devices play nice together, something called device interoperability. There are several consortiums focused on creating common standards so that all devices can interconnect and work harmoniously as one.

    This lack of loyalty to one common manufacturing standard for connected devices is one of the barriers holding back mass adoption in the UK, Europe and America. The IoT will only have reached critical mass when third-parties are able to connect to these products and offer new services. Marketers should watch, learn, be curious and follow tech updates in this space and track them back to how people are engaging with the tech around them, so that our customer journey planning is always built in tandem with evolutions in human behavior.*Photo credit The Verge

    With the huge increase in devices connected to the internet, comes a huge increase in devices that can be hacked. Security of web-enabled devices is another big issue facing the industry as a whole and one of the next hurdles to be overcome in the years to come. There have been some really interesting steps forward in the convergence of the mobile devices we all use, and the problems we are trying to fix. The selfie common place in our lives, at times seemingly ridiculous but could also be the future of biometrics.

    Mobile security firm Morpho is backing biometrics and facial recognition in particular, to make an impact on smartphone security over the next 12 months. The company expects biometrics capability on smartphones to become standard in the year to come, as it provides a unique combination of security and convenience for the user. This is a push for biometrics to replace passwords for unlocking phones and accessing services. It includes capabilities such as liveness detection to ensure that the image being captured is from a live person and not from a photo. MasterCard launched a trial of selfies and fingerprints for verifying transactions in 2015 and at MWC said it plans to bring "selfie pay" security checks to more than a dozen countries. *Mobile advertising needs to offer convenience and utility

    There are 3.7 billion mobile phones around the world today. There will be 6.5 billion by 2020. On average we spend 11 hours a day with our mobile device, on top of all the other media we use. Mobile changes how people behave, think, how they expect brands to engage with them. They will expect more scale, personalization and global reach

    They are also not totally anti being advertised to on their mobile device. We need to be laser focused on the experience that they are having when on it. Give the consumer a reason to opt in they will accept a value exchange if there is indeed value in it for them. Create a better experience for people in a mobile environment using utility and reward (For example, I will sign up for push notifications from Airbnb if it makes my next stay at an Airbnb easier with pre-arrival details)*Photo credit: mobilemarketingmagazine.com

    Marketers have to stitch it all together for the end consumer.

    We need to stop thinking of mobile experiences as just a marketing platform. The most powerful device in your hands is an everything platform, from media to commerce to utility and back again. Just look to mobile payments to see how speed, immediacy and ease of use has been transformative to an industry.

    Brand marketers need to think about the device in the hands of the consumer and keep up with the power, pace, freedom and connectivity that consumers are now enjoying.*

    *