roundup volume 117 issue 4

of 6/6
Mon.– Oct. 22 High: 78° Low: 58° Sunny Wed.– Oct. 17 High: 99° Low: 62° Sunny Congressional hopefuls, hosted in Pierce College’s Great Hall on Thursday, have continued to make headlines across the nation as two former allies each deal with fallout this week from their high-tension display. The 30th Congressional District race heated up late last week when Rep. Brad Sherman forcefully put his arm around opponent Rep. Howard Berman’s head with unclear intentions. The debate was part of Pierce’s Day of Politics 2, sponsored by Pierce’s Departments of Political Science, Economics, Criminal Justice, and Law and Chicano Studies. “We are in a heated and expensive race,” Berman said in a press statement earlier this week. “It’s become a very emotional race.” Berman’s campaign manager, Brandon Hall, was not so accommodating about the situation. “He reached up and tried to put him into a headlock,” Hall said. “That’s not appropriate for a congressman.” While trading rebuttals initially focused on responding to a question asked by a student regarding the Valley’s entertainment industry, Berman reassured the audience that he was the author of the DREAM Act, a bill meant to help illegal immigrants gain permanent residency.  Berman, who fell out of his chair twice during Sherman’s opening speech because of a gap in the stage, maintained that he was the author of the bill, despite Sherman’s saying otherwise. “When untruths are said, a person has to defend himself,” Berman said in his own defense. “And that raises the intensity of the debate.” Berman retorted to Sherman’s comment by addressing the audience. “He lies,” Berman said. “He knows I’m the house author of the DREAM Act. Why does he say that? Because he thinks he can get away with it. But, in the end, ya can’t fool all the people all the time, Brad.” Standing up, Sherman waited until the crowd’s cheers died down to share his point of view, citing the congressional representative of Illinois’ Fourth District, Luis Gutierrez, as the author of the bill. “Howard, Luis Gutierrez introduced the bill. You didn’t. And the official records of Congress will prove you wrong,” Sherman yelled into his microphone. “Howard, you wanna get into this?”  Upon seeing Sherman put his arm over Berman’s shoulder while yelling at him in the microphone, Deputy Bill Dunkin stepped onto the stage to prevent the situation from escalating.  “I heard a little bit of a heated argument,” Dunkin said. “They were cooperative. They split up. They were no problem at all.”  The congressmen, who have been pitted against one another this election because of redistricting, continued to speak over the crowd while Dunkin was on the stage.  “Don’t you dare stand up here in the West San Fernando Valley and get in my face,” Sherman said. “Stay away from me. You wanna put your face in mine? Go ahead.” This March, bidding will begin for the installation of next-generation technology at Pierce, according to a statement made at last week’s Academic Senate meeting. Jill Binsley, Technology Advisory Committee member, announced that the buildings in the North Mall will be equipped with 70 SMART Classrooms.  These will be installed and ready to use by Fall 2013, with a few now being used in the Center for Sciences building. “Pierce will have the most [SMART classrooms],” Binsley said. David Schamus, Chair of the Computer Science and Information Technology Department, explained to the Academic Senate a little more of the new state-of-the-art equipment. “[SMART Boards] are essentially electronic versions of the white board,” Schamus said. These new boards will be directly hard-wired into the room, so that instructors will not have to worry about bringing in their own cables to hook up their laptops. Blu-ray players, AV connectors, and higher Wi-Fi connectivity will also be in place with the new gear. “Interactive and media-rich environments in our classrooms is our goal,” Schamus said. The SMART classrooms are just one of many programs geared toward fast turn-around for students. Transfer Center Director Sunday Salter also introduced a new website, ADegreeWithAGuarantee.com. Two well-known professors explained alternatives and fiscal consequences during a debate on Proposition 30 for students in the Great Hall during the Day of Politics 2 at Pierce College on Thursday, Oct. 11. Professor of sociology Dr. James McKeever argued for the proposition and professor of economy Dr. Pamela Brown argued against it. Prop. 30 will be featured on the ballot this upcoming election, and if passed, the legislature will temporarily increase sales and income taxes to balance the ever-growing budget from 2013 to 2019, according to McKeever. Income and sales taxes, added together, make up two-thirds of California’s General Fund, as stated by the State Attorney General. If the bill doesn’t pass, there will be a $6 billion tax cut, heavily impacting K-12 schools and community colleges throughout California. Spending on education is currently the most expensive item on California’s budget. Under this rationale, in order to balance the budget there will be a reduction of education funding. A FIRST AMENDMENT PUBLICATION ROUND UP www.theroundupnews.com Woodland Hills, California Volume 117 - Issue 4 October 17, 2012 One copy free, each additional copy $1.00 Fallout continues for Sherman Economics instructor accused of hypocrisy during ‘Day of Politics 2’ Wed.– Oct. 24 High: 87° Low:59° Mostly Sunny PIERCE W EATHER R EPORT The Pierce College Weather Station has provided meteorological data to national agencies since 1949. Information for this week’s report comes from the National Weather Service and Accuweather. The Pierce Weather Station Report will be back next week. Thur.– Oct. 18 High: 99° Low: 60° Sunny Fri.– Oct. 19 High: 85° Low: 58° Sunny Sat.– Oct. 20 High: 82° Low: 58° Most Sunny Sun.– Oct. 21 High: 81° Low: 56° Sunny Tues.– Oct. 23 High: 81° Low: 54° Sunny “Howard, you wanna get into this?” -Brad Sherman SMART Boards coming in Fall 2013 Natalee Ayala/Roundup [email protected] $6 billion in losses if Prop. 30 fails [See FALLOUT, RU ONLINE] A comment made by Don Sparks, president for the American Federation of Teachers Chapter 1521A, directed towards Economics professor Pam Brown raised more than a few eyebrows at the Proposition 32 debate on Thursday, Oct. 11. Video footage of Brown and Sparks’ exchange during the debate appears between 31:46 and 32:43 in the Multimedia section of theroundupnews.com. “People have philosophies, and they can stick to them,” Sparks said. “But if you’re a hypocrite about your philosophy, that’s a different story.” The cheers and applause within the Great Hall echoed the crowd’s support for Sparks’ comment. Both parties separately agreed to speak to The Roundup on the subject Monday. Although many members of the audience noticed the comment, Brown did not. “I don’t remember him saying that I’m a hypocrite,” she claimed. Brown is a non-union professor at Pierce College, a unionized campus. Sparks did not deny making the controversial comment at the debate. “I probably did say something like that,” he confirmed. Proposition 32 requires that unions get permission from members before they use paid dues for political activism. “Because I am at Pierce, the union negotiates for me,” Brown explained. She also explained why she thought Sparks called her a hypocrite. “Pierce, a unionized campus, the union negotiates for me, so I’m a hypocrite because I’m not [See UNIONS, RU ONLINE] Dems nearly come to blows in Great Hall Billel Bensalem/Roundup [email protected] Two professors help students understand lasting ramifications of failure Oskar Gustowski/Roundup [email protected] Ma Goesman/Roundup [email protected] Professor called out on unions [See PROP. 30 FAILS, pg. 3] YES: Unions and corporations can not use money deducted from an employee’s paycheck for political purposes. NO: Unions and corporations can still use money deducted from an employee’s paycheck for political purposes. [See SMART, RU ONLINE] Pam Brown Donald Sparks Jose Romero/ Roundup SMART: Physics Professor Margaret Wessling uses a SMART Board in her Physics 6 class on March 22, 2011. pg. 6 Danny Duarte/ Roundup EXPLAIN: Dr. James McKeever and Dr. Pamela Brown debate pro’s and con’s of Prop. 30 during the Day of Politics 2 inside the Great Hall on Oct. 11. The two prominent instructors faced off about how the ballot measure will determine the future of community colleges throughout the state of California. Nadine Gustantian/ Roundup HEATED: Rep. Brad Sherman contributes to a heated discussion with Berman Howard at the Day of Politics 2 in the Great Hall at Pierce College in on Thursday, Oct 11, 2012. facebook.com/theroundup twitter.com/roundupnews youtube.com/roundupnews Proposition 32 Spike Pink

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Roundup Fall 2012 Issue 4

TRANSCRIPT

  • Mon. Oct. 22High: 78Low: 58

    Sunny

    Wed. Oct. 17High: 99Low: 62Sunny

    Congressional hopefuls, hosted in Pierce Colleges Great Hall on Thursday, have continued to make headlines across the nation as two former allies each deal with fallout this week from their high-tension display.

    The 30th Congressional District race heated up late last week when Rep. Brad Sherman forcefully put his arm around opponent Rep.Howard Bermans head with unclear intentions.

    The debate was part of Pierces Day of Politics 2, sponsored by Pierces Departments of Political Science, Economics, Criminal Justice, and Law and Chicano Studies.

    We are in a heated and expensive race, Berman said in a press statement earlier this week. Its become a very emotional race.

    Bermans campaign manager, Brandon Hall, was not so accommodating about the situation.

    He reached up and tried to put him into a headlock, Hall said. Thats not appropriate for a congressman.

    While trading rebuttals initially focused on responding to a question asked by a student regarding the Valleys entertainment industry, Berman reassured the audience that he was the author of the DREAM Act,

    a bill meant to help illegal immigrants gain permanent residency.

    Berman, who fell out of his chair twice during Shermans opening speech because of a gap in the stage, maintained that he was the author of the bill, despite Shermans saying otherwise.

    When untruths are said, a person has to defend himself, Berman said in his own defense. And that raises the intensity of the debate.

    Berman retorted to Shermans

    comment by addressing the audience.He lies, Berman said. He knows

    Im the house author of the DREAM Act. Why does he say that? Because he thinks he can get away with it. But, in the end, ya cant fool all the people all the time, Brad.

    Standing up, Sherman waited until the crowds cheers died down to share his point of view, citing the congressional representative of Illinois Fourth District, Luis Gutierrez, as the author of the bill.

    Howard, Luis Gutierrez introduced the bill. You didnt. And the official records of Congress will prove you wrong, Sherman yelled into his microphone. Howard, you wanna get into this?

    Upon seeing Sherman put his arm over Bermans shoulder while yelling at him in the microphone, Deputy Bill Dunkin stepped onto the stage to prevent the situation from escalating.

    I heard a little bit of a heated argument, Dunkin said. They were

    cooperative. They split up. They were no problem at all.

    The congressmen, who have been pitted against one another this election because of redistricting, continued to speak over the crowd while Dunkin was on the stage.

    Dont you dare stand up here in the West San Fernando Valley and get in my face, Sherman said. Stay away from me. You wanna put your face in mine? Go ahead.

    This March, bidding will begin for the installation of next-generation technology at Pierce, according to a statement made at last weeks Academic Senate meeting.

    Jill Binsley, Technology Advisory Committee member, announced that the buildings in the North Mall will be equipped with 70 SMART Classrooms.

    These will be installed and ready to use by Fall 2013, with a few now being used in the Center for Sciences building.

    Pierce will have the most [SMART classrooms], Binsley said.

    David Schamus, Chair of the Computer Science and Information Technology Department, explained to the Academic Senate a little more of the new state-of-the-art equipment.

    [SMART Boards] are essentially electronic versions of the white board, Schamus said.

    These new boards will be directly hard-wired into the room, so that instructors will not have to worry about bringing in their own cables to hook up their laptops.

    Blu-ray players, AV connectors, and higher Wi-Fi connectivity will also be in place with the new gear.

    Interactive and media-rich environments in our classrooms is our goal, Schamus said.

    The SMART classrooms are just one of many programs geared toward fast turn-around for students.

    Transfer Center Director Sunday Salter also introduced a new website, ADegreeWithAGuarantee.com.

    Two well-known professors explained alternatives and fiscal consequences during a debate on Proposition 30 for students in the Great Hall during the Day of Politics 2 at Pierce College on Thursday, Oct. 11.

    Professor of sociology Dr. James McKeever argued for the proposition and professor of

    economy Dr. Pamela Brown argued against it.Prop. 30 will be featured on the ballot

    this upcoming election, and if passed, the legislature will temporarily increase sales and income taxes to balance the ever-growing budget from 2013 to 2019, according to McKeever.

    Income and sales taxes, added together, make up two-thirds of Californias General Fund, as stated by the State Attorney General.

    If the bill doesnt pass, there will be a $6 billion tax cut, heavily impacting K-12 schools and community colleges throughout California.

    Spending on education is currently the most expensive item on Californias budget.

    Under this rationale, in order to balance the budget there will be a reduction of education funding.

    A FIRST AMENDMENT PUBLICATION

    ROUNDUPwww.theroundupnews.comROUNDWoodland Hills, California Volume 117 - Issue 4 October 17, 2012 One copy free, each additional copy $1.00

    Fallout continues for Sherman

    Economics instructor accused of hypocrisy during Day of Politics 2

    Wed. Oct. 24High: 87Low:59

    Mostly Sunny

    P I E R C E W E A T H E R R E P O R TThe Pierce College Weather Station has provided meteorological data to

    national agencies since 1949.

    Information for this weeks report comes from the National Weather Service

    and Accuweather. The Pierce Weather Station Report will be back next week.

    Thur. Oct. 18High: 99Low: 60

    Sunny

    Fri. Oct. 19High: 85Low: 58

    Sunny

    Sat. Oct. 20High: 82Low: 58

    Most Sunny

    Sun. Oct. 21High: 81Low: 56

    Sunny

    Tues. Oct. 23High: 81Low: 54

    Sunny

    Howard, you wanna get into this?

    -Brad Sherman

    SMART Boards coming inFall 2013Natalee Ayala/[email protected]

    $6 billion in losses if Prop. 30 fails[See FALLOUT, RU ONLINE]

    A comment made by Don Sparks, president for the American Federation of Teachers Chapter 1521A, directed towards Economics professor Pam Brown raised more than a few eyebrows at the Proposition 32 debate on Thursday, Oct. 11.

    Video footage of Brown and Sparks exchange during the debate

    appears between 31:46 and 32:43 in the Multimedia section of theroundupnews.com.

    People have philosophies, and they can stick to them, Sparks said. But if youre a hypocrite about your philosophy, thats a different story.

    The cheers and applause within the Great Hall echoed the crowds support for Sparks comment.

    Both parties separately agreed to speak to The Roundup on the subject

    Monday.Although many members of the

    audience noticed the comment, Brown did not.

    I dont remember him saying that Im a hypocrite, she claimed.

    Brown is a non-union professor at Pierce College, a unionized campus.

    Sparks did not deny making the controversial comment at the debate.

    I probably did say something like that, he confirmed.

    Proposition 32 requires that unions get permission from members before they use paid dues for political activism.

    Because I am at Pierce, the union negotiates for me, Brown explained.

    She also explained why she thought Sparks called her a hypocrite.

    Pierce, a unionized campus, the union negotiates for me, so Im a hypocrite because Im not

    [See UNIONS, RU ONLINE]

    Dems nearly come to blows in Great Hall

    Billel Bensalem/Roundup [email protected]

    Two professors help students understand lasting rami cations of failureOskar Gustowski/[email protected]

    Ma Go esman/Roundupmgo [email protected]

    Professor called out on unions

    [See PROP. 30 FAILS, pg. 3]

    YES: Unions and corporations can not use money deducted from an employees paycheck for political purposes.

    NO: Unions and corporations can still use money deducted from an employees paycheck for political purposes.

    [See SM ART, RU ONLINE]

    Pam Brown Donald Sparks

    Jose Romero/ RoundupSMART: Physics Professor Margaret Wessling uses a SMART Board in her Physics 6 class on March 22, 2011.

    pg. 6

    Danny Duarte/ RoundupEXPLAIN: Dr. James McKeever and Dr. Pamela Brown debate pros and cons of Prop. 30 during the Day of Politics 2 inside the Great Hall on Oct. 11. The two prominent instructors faced o about how the ballot measure will determine the future of community colleges throughout the state of California.

    Nadine Gustantian/ RoundupHEATED: Rep. Brad Sherman contributes to a heated discussion with Berman Howard at the Day of Politics 2 in the Great Hall at Pierce College in on Thursday, Oct 11, 2012.

    facebook.com/theroundup

    twitter.com/roundupnews

    youtube.com/roundupnews

    Proposition 32

    Spike Pink

  • ROUNDUP: October 17, 2012Opinion 2

    Letters to the Editor

    6201 Winnetka Ave.Woodland Hills, CA 91371

    Room: Pierce College Village 8211Phone: (818) 719-6427

    Fax: (818) 719-6447Website: www.theroundupnews.comE-mail: [email protected]

    gmail.com

    Roundup Editor in chief ....................... UDManaging editor ...................... Jose RomeroOpinion editor ....................... Calvin AlagotNews editor .................... Monica VelasquezFeatures editor ................ Monica VelasquezA&E editor ............................ Natalee AyalaSports editor .......................... Charlie KnappPhoto editor ....................... Kristen AslanianAsst. Photo editor ................. Jasson BautistaOnline editor ............................ Jose RomeroCartoonist ................................. Austin Faber

    Advisers ................................... Jill Connelly.................................. Stefanie Frith ........................................ Jeff Favre

    Advertising Manager.................. Julie Bailey[For advertising call Julie at (818) 710-2960]

    Photographers:

    Jasson BautistaCarlos Carpio Danny DuarteNadine Gostantian Sonia GurollaMartin Lester Lynn Levitt Adriana Lopez Fariba MolaviSteve Palma Todd Rosenblatt Monica SalazarBridget SmythStella Stewart Riley StigterLauren Vellve

    Reporters:

    Billel BensalemDuevone BroomfieldViolet CaneloMario CruzLarry FobbsMatt GottesmanOskar GustowskiNavid KhoiNick McNamara Michaia HernandezKashish NizamiJackie NovaMarquis ParkerKevin PerezKirsten QuinnGonzalo ReyDavid SchubLatrise Simpson

    Weather Correspondent:

    Kevin Gabriel Policy:

    Letters and guest columns for or against any position are invited. Letters should be kept as brief as possible (300 words or less) and are subject to non-substantive editing.

    Letters must be signed and include a valid mailing address and telephone number. Pseudonyms or initials will not be used, but names may be withheld upon request and approval of the Editorial Board.

    The Roundup publishes Letters to the Editor that are not obscene or libelous and do not contain racial denigration.

    Writers are given the opportunity to revise unacceptable letters.

    The Pierce College Roundup will not publish, as letters, literary endeavors, publicity releases, poetry or other such materials as the Editorial Board deems not to be a letter.

    The deadline is 11:59 p.m. the Sunday prior to the issue date.Editorial Policy:

    The Pierce College Roundup position is presented only in the editorials.

    Cartoons and photos, unless run under the editorial masthead, and columns are the opinions of the creators and not necessarily that of the Roundup.

    The college newspaper is

    published as a learning experience under the college journalism instructional program. The editorial and advertising materials published herein, including any opinions expressed, are the responsibility of the student newspaper staff.

    Under appropriate state and federal court decisions, these materials are free from prior restraint by the virtue of the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America.

    Accordingly, materials published herein, including any opinions expressed, should not be interpreted as the position of the L.A. Community College District, the college or any officer or employee thereof.

    Times are tough, and during these tough times there is one place where we can all come together, school. However, the truth of the matter is that many of the students at Pierce are indifferent, or simply do not care, about the school they go to. This reality should be worrisome. School pride is very important because our school provides us with so

    many opportunities, even with budget cuts. Pierce College students are able to get a good education. Pierce is home to some of the most elite educators in the state, and

    many make themselves available for students and provide guidance when asked.

    Students at Pierce are also able to receive job training, which gives students who take advantage of this opportunity a running head start.

    There is something unique that Pierce offers that some tend to overlook.

    Pierce gives students the opportunity to be around likeminded and goal-oriented people.

    As a junior college, many students at Pierce eventually hope to transfer to a 4-year institution.

    This common goal should bring us all closer together as a student body, but it is not enough for some.

    As students, we are quick to complain about something about our school, whether it be how difficult it is to get classes or how messy parts of the campus are.

    Frankly, as students, we have to start taking responsibility for our school, and take some pride in the place where we all come to learn.

    We are not children, so we should not expect to be treated as such. It is not the schools fault that we are running low on classes, nor is it

    the schools job to ensure we pick up after ourselves on campus. These are things we should know, and even for those who do not

    necessarily like the school itself for whatever reason, there are still little things you can do to make your school a better place.

    One could attend the sporting events held on campus, for example. According to Athletic Director Bob Lofrano, out of the 19,000

    students on campus, less than 500 actually show up to the football games, and, at best, merely 80 to 100 attend the volleyball and swimming events.

    Thats less than one percent of the school population supporting their fellow students at most sporting events.

    Lofrano jokes that people have better things to do on a Friday night, like going out and watching movies.

    Paying ones fees on time is also a way to help improve the school. If Pierce students paid all of their course fees on time, the college

    would have more money readily available and students can register earlier for their classes, decreasing the hefty number of crashers.

    Students at Pierce College can do many more things to show school spirit, like attending lectures, functions, shows, or even organizing a homecoming.

    College is what you make of it, and at the end of the day, if we dont care about our school, nobody else will.

    Editorial

    Where is your school spirit?With such a great campus our school needs to represent

    Our quality of education is in danger, and every student on this campus knows it.

    But Proposition 38 is not the way to go.

    Everyone with an eye to the news has heard it.

    A new tax initiative has to be passed or automatic trigger cuts (amounting to $6 billion) will go into effect, according to the Huffington Post.

    These cuts would shorten school years for K-12 students and increase fees for higher education students many of whom are already strapped for cash or possibly in debt based on the current figures putting student debt at more than $1 trillion.

    This is where Prop. 38, or Molly Mungers Tax for Education measure will put us.

    The first impression voters get from commercials about the proposition are very favorable.

    Happy music, children saying they want their teachers to come back, promises of funding for education the commercial has it all.

    Indeed, Prop. 38 would bring in an estimated $10 billion, $6 billion of which would go to education, the rest going towards the State debt or child care and preschool programs.

    But what is continuously not mentioned is the most important part of the proposition: Where does this money come from?

    It comes from everyone. Or everyone with an income over $7,316 a year, rather.

    All people who pay income taxes will have their taxes raised by from .4 percent to 2.2 percent.

    With poverty at an all-time high, according to Think Progress, this cannot be considered a good idea.

    Most people are not millionaires, they are working class.

    There are many working class people struggling out there who are worrying about how to pay for necessities tuition, how to pay rent, how to pay for electricity who cannot afford higher taxes on their income.

    Yet Molly Munger, who personally funded more than $30 million in favor of this proposition, believes that this is the correct way to improve our schools.

    Students cannot be expected to get the full value of their education if they are worrying about how they will survive from day to day.

    How will K12 students be able to focus on their work when they see their parents struggle?

    How will college or university students be able to study for classes if they have to work extra shifts?

    Furthermore, this proposition would not stop the automatic cuts anyway, and would still fail to add one cent in funding to schools for 18 months, according to the Press Telegram.

    Proposition 38 harms exactly who it aims to help, and does a disservice to the workers of California.

    Workers should oppose this proposition in favor of one of the other two tax initiatives on the ballot.

    You have as much power as you are willing to exercise.

    Not a light bulb shines, not a telephone rings, not a wheel turns without the kind permission of the working class, as Alan Woods once said.

    Support education, oppose worsening conditions for workers.

    There is always an alternative.

    Prop. 38 is problematicTax initiative harms who it hopes to help

    Nick [email protected]

    Opinion

    Corrections

    Volume 117 - Issue 3 Features [Page 4]

    -Harper Lee is the author of To Kill A Mockingbird, not Maya Angelou. Sports [Page 6] -Mario Cruz wrote the Water Polo story. -The football photo is from a different game against L.A. South West. -In the caption for the football game, Nick Arbuckle is misspelled.

    Thumbs up & Thumbs down

    By Austin Faber

    For more comics visit:

    www.theroundupnews.com

    Cheap Student Health Care

    Smelly smell that smells smelly

    A big stinky thumbs down to the pile of manure next to the Village. The thick smell is nauseating.

    The permeating stench f loats around campus making students feel faint, especially on hot and windy days.

    Get rid of it, please!

    A big thumbs up to Beth Benne and the Student Health Center for their dedication to student well-being.

    Despite budget cuts to their program they continue to provide free to low-cost health care.

    Keep up the great work and thank you so much.

  • Though not as infamous as the Sherman versus Berman political debate later in the day, the Proposition 32 debate between two prominent Pierce professors in the Great Hall turned some faculty members heads during the campus Day of Politics 2.

    Professor of Economics Dr. Pamela Brown, and Professor of Sociology Dr. James McKeever debated the pros and cons of the issue during the day-long event geared toward educating Pierce students, faculty and staff on upcoming political propositions.

    Prop. 32 is a paycheck protection ballot measure that, among other things, it ensures unions will not be able to use wage-deducted fees to contribute to state and local candidates campain funds .

    McKeever is against the proposition passing, and maintained that if unions shrink, wages would

    shrink as well.Unions make work situations

    better, McKeever said. They make big corporations listen.

    Brown supports Prop. 32 passing, and feels she should be able to independently spend her own political funds on the best qualified candidate that she likes.

    If Prop. 32 fails, she cannot vote or participate in her own employment contract unless she pays chargeable and non-chargeable political dues to the American Federation of Teachers, the bargaining agent for Pierce College.

    If she pays both of these fees then she will have a voice, and be able negotiate the employment contract.

    She says that she doesnt want some union to negotiate for her, she can negotiate her own money.

    She feels that unions protect jobs by giving some teachers seniority, but believes it would be better if teachers had to compete for the positions.

    [see DEBATE, RU ONLINE]

    ROUNDUP: October 17, 2012 News 3

    Josr Romero/RoundupTESTING: Former student Roxi Vixenberg has her cheek swap during a free HIV test during AIDS Awareness Week. Results are avaliable in only 20 minutes 21, 2011.

    Event scheaduled to educate about preventing and living with HIV/AIDS

    Student has seizure in Village Students who took fast action

    were able to aid their fellow classmate who was experiencing a seizure in Village 8330 on Wednesday night.

    To report any emergencies or concerning activities, students can use any of the blue light emergency phones or call the sheriffs station directly at 818-710-4311.

    Weather Station rededicatedThe Pierce College Weather

    Station, dubbed the newest/oldest weather station in the country was rededicated on Thursday morning for a local storm hit. Congressman Brad Sherman was recognized for his efforts in securing the $85,000 grant that paid for the weather stations latest improvements.

    Hail takes campus by surprise Rain, thunder, lightning, and

    hail took Pierce College students by surprise on Thursday afternoon.

    The hail lasted approximately 20 minutes, and were no larger than marbles

    Doppler radar estimated 1.5 inches of rain per hour, according to a statement released by the National Weather Service (NWS).

    The potential consequences if

    and when Proposition 30 fails[cont. from PROP. 30 FAILS pg. 1]

    taxable merchandise for four years.That equals to roughly one fourth

    of a penny for every dollar spent.The income tax is raised marginally

    for high-income households, starting with those who make two hundred fifty thousand dollars or more annually.

    Currently, the tax for high-income homes is 9.3% and it will be increased for seven years.

    What does this mean in terms of education funding?

    McKeever and Brown argued the implications Prop. 30 could have on community colleges.

    Brown focused on the fiscal impact the bill would have if passed.

    My concern is if we raise this tax we are going to lose tax base, Brown said. And our revenues will shrink.

    Consumers, when faced with increased prices, will shop around for potentially cheaper costs, resulting in a loss of business to out-of-state markets, according to Brown.

    Instead of raising taxes, Brown insists advocates the widespread privatization of education.

    This will increase competitiveness and lower costs by weeding out under-qualified and incompetent faculty and replacing them with fewer but more highly-skilled teachers.

    Brown also criticized teachers unions, a reference to her Prop. 32 debate the same day.

    One good teacher is better than three mediocre ones, Brown said.

    This proposed method will solve our expenditure problem while simultaneously increasing the quality of education.

    McKeevers rebuttal focused on the impact this bill would have.

    He insisted that unions are created for the best interest of the students.

    If you think classes were hard to get this semester, it is going to be amazingly difficult to get classes next semester, McKeever said.

    California State Universities have already prepared to raise tuition if the bill does not pass, according to McKeever.

    Unions advocate students rights and what is necessary for a proper education, according to McKeever.

    Difficulty in completing courses will be magnified if the budget cuts go through.

    Students with a hard time transferring are especially fearful of the havoc a $6 billion cut could wreak.

    I was weighing more toward McKeever, psychology major Lauren Schmidt said. Id like to finish school.

    Philosophy major Ryan Cook publicly endorsed Prop. 30 during the debate. His reasoning was for the funding it provides.

    Norma Daoud will also vote yes for Prop. 30.

    Im a college student, Daoud said. I need more money.

    With elections on Nov. 6, the vote for what will impact their academic careers is drawing closer.

    NewsBRIEFS

    HIV/AIDS Awareness Week will be taking place Monday, Oct. 22 through Thursday, Oct. 25 with free HIV testing available for Pierce College students.

    An RV will be parked in Lot 1, in front of the Student Services Building where students can go in for HIV testing, from either a cheek swab or a finger stick, and get the results within 20 minutes.

    The event is sponsored by Bienestar and The AIDS Healthcare Foundation through AIDS Project Los Angeles.

    Along with a brief education of HIV and safe sex, workers will be handing out condoms to students.

    For teachers who signed up with the Be Alive Speaker Program, volunteers living with HIV will be speaking to classes to discuss some intimate insight about contracting the disease, including what it is like living with AIDS and the medication they take to prolong

    their lives.Joey Hahn, 18, an Haley

    Steinmetz, 18, have been dating for more than two years.

    They both agree that it is a good idea for Pierce to be doing free HIV testing.

    Neither of them were tested when their relationship first began.

    We both trust each other, the couple said.

    Free testing is available every March and October for HIV Awareness Week, but always available at the Student Health

    Center for a nominal fee.According to Beth Benne,

    director of the Student Health Center, the turnout of students for getting tested in past semesters have been low, around 30 a day, but hopes next weeks turnout will be better.

    The testing will be available for students on Monday and Thursday between 2 and 7 p.m. and Tuesday and Wednesday 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.

    The Student Health Center is located on the second floor of the Student Services Building.

    Debate on Prop. 32 pits professor agaist professor

    Duevone Broomfield/[email protected]

    David Schub/[email protected]

    Free HIV testing for AIDS Awareness

    Political funding contribution in hands of union

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  • ROUNDUP: October 17, 2012Photo Essay4

    Dusk t i l l dawn fun at har vest fes t i v a l

    Top: The sunset ends the day at the Farm Center on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012.

    Above: Tiernan Carney, 1, (top), Bella Kit, 5, (center left), and Tallulah Carney, 4, (right) laugh and hang on tight to The Pirates Revenge ship.

    Right: Emmy Frevele leaps from a bale of hay into the arms of Charles Martinez.

    Bottom: Sofie Chen, 1, tries corn on the cob, held by parents Alan and Nina Chen.

    As the sun sets over the Pierce Farm Center, the clouds paint a dramatic mural in the darkening fall sky. The bright lights and decorations draw in crowds, consisting of parents, children and adventure-seekers looking to enjoy the farms festivities. Booths selling corn-on-the-cob, lemonade and turkey legs provide hungry attendees delicious food.Boat rides, large slides, and other carinval rides bring smiles and laughter to many young faces.Others wander the corn maze while giant pumpkins open eyes wide. The fun runs late into the night as the clock nears midnight.

    Photos: Lynn Levitt

  • Richard McMillan has so many neckties that he hasnt worn the same one to work since the first day of Fall 2010.

    The only exception is his paisley navy necktie, which he wears the first day of each semester and has for the last 20 years.

    I just wanted to see how far I could go. I think Im going to see this semester through without repeating a tie, McMillanwearing a sky blue shirt, brown pants, and a blue-and-brown tiesaid. I dont know when its going to end.

    For the past 17 years, he has been teaching U.S. and Latin American history at Pierce College, McMillan, 59, has become known as the guy with the tie to both colleagues and students.

    In fact, back when the administration building and the mailroom were located next to each other, he would often visit the secretaries to show them his tie du jour (or tie of the day), he said.

    Neckties have been a staple in McMillans wardrobe since 1989. Back then, he was a student teacher trying to get his teaching credentials.

    In order to impress the principal of the school he was teaching at, he wore neckties to work.

    If you only have three neckties, it gets very boring, he said. I was the only guy in the school who wore a necktie.

    Thats when his collection started.

    Wherever I go, I keep looking for neckties, he said. I would get more and more and more and now its insane. It became almost a sickness.

    Despite McMillans decision to wear a different tie each day hes at Pierce College, he doesnt know how many ties he owns.

    Im not going to count them because if I do, itll just tell me what a problem I have, he said.

    McMillan has everything from novelty ties and regular ties to holiday- and history-themed ties. Some are gifts from friends and family, while others are unplanned purchases.

    In addition to ensuring he is wearing the right ties for the right holiday, weekend event or historical lecture, he has a drawer full of pens

    to color coordinate with his ties.I spend much too much time

    thinking about my outfit. I really think it over, he said. It would be wrong to wear a tie that doesnt match.

    McMillan is so careful about his neckties that he keeps a spare one rolled up and tucked away in one of his desk drawers, just in case he accidentally stains his ties while hes at work.

    He considers the brown, black, blue, and white striped necktie the perfect tie because he can wear it with any color combination he might have on his outfit for the day.

    That kinda tells you how Im thinking about this, he said. [Its like how] I have a spare tire for my car, I have a spare tie in my drawer.

    Instructor of English Richard Follett, who sometimes walks with McMillan to classes, thinks that his tie collection is wonderful.

    Every professor is a little eccentric, he said.

    McMillans neckties, particularly the historical-themed ones he wears to accent particular lectures, is one of the ways he makes his classes enjoyable for his students.

    He seems like he cares a lot about the subject. He wants to make it entertaining for us, said Iqra Hamid, 20, one of McMillans current students.

    McMillans love for ties sometimes gets him into

    uncomfortable situations, however. Once, while shopping for the holidays, someonethinking that he worked at the department storeasked him where the shoe section was. McMillan said that the shopper

    got mad at his incompetence as an employee before she found out that he didnt work at the store.

    I think neckties carry over authority, McMillan said.

    Because his fondness of neckties

    is well known, McMillan says that he occasionally gets ties from students, from thrift store novelty ties to very nice ties.

    It hasnt improved their grades, though, he said with a laugh.

    ROUNDUP: October 17, 2012 Features 5

    Instructor keeps it esh by wearing a di erent necktie every dayHistory professor is always tied up

    Jose Romero/ Roundup

    TIED UP: Professor Richard McMillan sits in his office, draped with a collection of neckties that he keeps handy in case he may need to switch it up if one gets stained, Oct. 16, 2012 in Woodland Hills, Calif.

    Im not going to count

    them because if I do,

    itll just tell me what a

    problem I have.

    -Richard McMillan

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  • ROUNDUP October 17, 2012Sports6Football

    vs. LA Valley Oct. 13 - (W 41-31)

    @ Santa Barbara Oct. 19 - 7 p.m.

    Womens Water Polo

    @ Cuesta Oct. 10 - (W 11-10)

    vs. Citrus Oct. 17 - 3:30 p.m.

    Womens Soccer

    vs. West LA Oct. 12 - (W 11-0)

    @ LA Valley Oct. 19 - 3 p.m.

    Womens Volleyball

    vs. Santa Monica Oct. 12 - (W 3-0)

    @ West LA Oct. 17 - 7 p.m.

    Pink shirts were seen all throughout out the crowd at the Pierce College womens volleyball game at the South Gym on Friday night.

    Pierce students, faculty and families attended Spike Pink to support the volleyball team as they played against Santa Monica College in hopes of raising awareness for breast cancer and raising funds for the Susan G. Komen Foundation.

    All of the girls on the team wore pink shirts and some wore pink bandanas and socks. Many of the parents also wore pink to support the cause.

    Since the month of October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, head coach Nabil Mardini and the team felt it was appropriate and beneficial to show their support.

    We pick a day in October and we raise money to support cancer research, Mardini said. Everybody is affected indirectly or directly by cancer, so it is a great cause.

    The volleyball team will raise money by getting paid from sponsors for each spike, dig, and kill during the match. Family, friends, parents and anyone who attended could be a sponsor for the cause.

    For example, some of the girls are getting paid $1 per dig or block by the sponsor to raise money for

    breast cancer awareness, said freshman middle Kaitlyn Reiner.

    Many parents were sponsoring for their daughters and were proud to be a part of the whole event. Lindsay Anderson, mother of freshman opposite hitter Lindsay Maxoutopoulis, was very enthusiastic about donating.

    If my daughter gets to play tonight, I will absolutely participate, said Anderson. Its really great to see all the youth participate in these programs.

    Male players from other teams at Pierce College were also wearing pink to support. Members of the mens team wore pink while serving as linesmen during the game.

    I noticed there are a lot of boys from different sports teams here

    wearing pink, Anderson said. I think thats great.

    According to the fliers displayed around South Gym, anyone can

    donate to this program by writing a check to Pierce College Athletics and can be handed to Mardini or Athletic Director Bob Lofrano.

    Im happy to wear this pink shirt because I love supporting causes that are dear to my heart, Reiner said with a smile.

    Spike Pink a winner for Brahmas womens volleyball

    To be a successful soccer player, dedication and passion are essential.

    Pierce College freshmen forward soccer players Shawnie Moore and Jacqueline Hilario are examples of dedicated athletes who have a love for the game.

    The top of the scoring leaderboard for the Brahmas has shifted back and forth between Moore and Hilario all season long. Some games end with Hilario in the lead and some end with Moore on top.

    Moore was born in Texas and later came to California where she graduated from St. Genevieve High School.

    Growing up, Moore was especially close to her mother who has always been very supportive of all her endeavors.

    She likes it because she knows

    how much I like it, Moore said when asked about how her mother feels about her joining the college soccer team.

    During her senior year in high school, she met Pierce head coach Adolfo Perez who suggested that she play for his team after noticing her skills.

    Shawnie brings speed and athleticism to the game, Coach Perez said.

    Moore has been playing soccer for 11 years and does not plan to stop playing anytime soon.

    When I was younger, I tried every sport but soccer came naturally, Moore said. So I kept playing it growing up.

    Moore wants to attend the University of Southern California or Arizona State University after Pierce, where she plans to major in Psychology and will continue to play her favorite sport.

    Moore also said that Hope Solo,

    the starting goalkeeper for the United States womens national team, is an inspiration to her and that she enjoys running with her mother when she isnt playing soccer.

    Hilario was born in Granada Hills, Calif. and attended El Camino High School.

    Hilario met Perez when she joined his soccer club at the age of nine.

    He later suggested that she play for the Pierce College team.

    Jackie gives us a lot of composure and ability to score goals, Perez said.

    Hilario has been playing soccer since age six and played for her fathers soccer team which consisted of mostly male players.

    We are a soccer family, Hilario said. They support me and they always come to my games.

    Hilario plans to major in kinesiology and physical therapy

    as well as attend a Division I university.

    Wherever she goes, Hilario will continue to pursue soccer and improve her skills on and off the field.

    I have passion for the game because it gives me something to look forward to, Hilario said. Its a motive in life.

    Hilario also said that an inspirational player she looks up to is Alex Morgan, a forward for the U.S. womens national team, and that she has no other hobbies because she is fully dedicated to soccer.

    Teammate Joandra Ramirez had great things to say about both girls.

    It is great to play with both of them because they are key players to the game, Ramirez said. They give us more hope to score goals.

    Both Moore and Hilario have only played for Pierce this year but hope to continue playing for future

    semesters.While both have found success

    so far this season, it hasnt come without some minor setbacks.

    Both Moore and Hilario have missed games this season due to injuries.

    Moore suffered a separated shoulder early in the season. Hilario also missed time after being cut under the left eye by an elbow of an

    opposing player in an early season game.

    With supportive family members and heart for the game, both girls are looking forward to winning more games and representing Pierce College with honor by incorporating their skill and teamwork.

    With teamwork, Moore and Hilario hope to lead their team to the playoffs.

    Players wear pink for breast cancer fundraiser

    Nick McNamara/ [email protected]

    The Pierce College womens soccer team scored early and scored often against West Los Angeles College, defeating the Wildcats 11-0 in The Pit on Friday.

    The Brahmas now have a record of 8-3-1 after their shutout win over West L.A., who dropped to 0-6 in conference with the loss.

    Pierce started the game quickly with a goal in the first minute by freshman forward Jacqueline Hilario, who finished the game with three goals.

    The Brahmas did not slow down from there, with freshman midfielder Harmony Durand making it 2-0 with a goal in the third minute of play.

    Pierce added to their lead going into halftime, putting West L.A. into a six-goal deficit with goals from sophomore midfielder Edith Dominguez, freshman forward Shawnie Moore, freshman forward Mariela Chopin, and another from Hilario.

    Coming out of the halftime, Pierce once again came out with speed, quickly racking up two goals in less than 10 minutes. Both goals

    were scored by Moore, completing her second hat trick of the season.

    I thought perhaps theyd come out a little bit harder in the second half, but it was kind of the same game, Moore said.

    Three more goals were scored by Pierce; one by Hilario to complete her hat trick, one by sophomore midfielder Joandra Ramirez and one by freshman defender Karina Ramirez, who ended the scoring and gave Pierce their sixth shutout win of the season.

    Pierce head coach Adolfo Perez expected more of a challenge from the West L.A. squad.

    They have lost every game, but some of the scores were pretty close, so we figured it was going to be a little tougher, Perez said.

    Perez said the teams goal was to play strong, knowing West L.A. would be desperate.

    They have not scored a goal, and eventually theyre going to, Perez said. We did not want to be that team.

    Pierce was scheduled to face top-ranked College of the Canyons, who knocked Pierce out of the playoffs last season, on Tuesday, Oct. 16.

    For the full story on this game, visit www.theroundupnews.com.

    Soccers dynamic duo leads attack

    Soccer thrashes winless West L.A.Two freshmen record three goals each in 11-0 home victory

    Top goalscorers lead potent offensive unit with dominanceViolet Canelo/ [email protected]

    Violet Canelo/ [email protected]

    Jasson Bautista/ RoundupJUGGLE: Freshmen forwards Shawnie Moore (left) and Jacqueline Hilario practice head-ers in The Pit. The two have formed a dynamic threat for the Brahmas.

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    Steve Palma/ RoundupPINK: Members of the mens and womens volleyball teams pose for a photograph following Pierces vicotry over Santa Monica College.

    F12_Issue004_Front_page001F12_Issue004_Opinion_page002F12_Issue004_News_Page003F12_Issue004_PhotoEssay_pg004F12_Issue004_A&E_page005F12_Issue004_Sports_pg006