rosicrucian digest, september 1953

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  • Solving Problems by SuicideCan earthly cares follow the soul?

    V A V

    Vitality Means LifeSurveying the human atom.

    V A V

    Teachings of Jacob BoehmeFrom a threefold illumination.

    V A V

    Mysticism Science The Arts

    V A V

    TfextADemonstration of Alchemy

    V A V

    Meditation

    ROSICRUCIAIV1953

    SEPTEM BER30c p e r copy

    DIGEST

  • Love(From a Painting by H . Spencer Lewis)

    Idol

    Nefertiti

    In Color Seven inches high, lifelike, colors as on the original. Price includes mailing charges.

    Only

    $ 4 .7 5each

    ( 1 /1 3 /1 1 sterling)

    X T E F E R riTI. renowned as llie most beautiful queen of Egypt.Her very name means, Beautys Arrival. She was tlie wife

    ol Pharaoh Amenliotep IV and over 2500 years ago posed daily lor the kings chief artist. I he sculptor took great pains to do justice to her overwhelming beauty. I he bust statue he made of the queen was found a few years ago and has been declared by leading artists and sculptors as bei ng expressive of the ideal lorm ol feminine beauty and also as representing an exquisite mystical grace . . . she was truly an idol of love.

    An exact reproduction of the magnificent original is on display at the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum in San Jose. Now, beautiful home-size replicas, in colors, of this masterful work have been made in quantities for low-cost distribution.

    An Inspiration for Home and SanctumOwn one of these lovely replicas. Lifelike, colored after the

    original. More than just a gracious statue or pleasing adornment, the Nelertiti art piece will seem to bestow' a consoling presence in any room it occupies. Place it anywhere . . . 011 the mantel, bookcase. dresser, or better still, in your private sanctum. You will prize it highly and come to regard it as a reminder of past glory.

    RO SICRUCIA N SUPPLY BUREAUSAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA. U. S. A.

    (E A C H MONTH T H I S P A G E IS D E V O TE D TO T H E E X H IB IT IO N O F S T U D E N T S U P P L I E S . )

  • ROSE-CROIX UNIVERSITY GRADUATESAbove are shown graduates of the 1953 term of the Rose-Croix U niversity and the faculty members. The colleges of the

    university include such subjects as art. music, philosophy, biology, chemistry, creative writing, psychology, parapsychology, and comparative religion. All these subjects are presented in a comprehensible way. They are as easily understood as the articles contained in this publication. The Rosicrucian students attending are from various sections of the United States and from a number of foreign countries. (Photo by AMORC)

  • CAN MAM REACH KEYOIMD THE VEIL?

    On the Edge of EternitySo C'i ,o k e and y e t so far from the source of all is m an. Are we allowed b u t a

    fleeting glance a t the universeju s t a conscious interim on th e stage of life a brief look a t th e setting , the stage, and our fellow players? Must each m inute be lived regardless of w hat it affords, or can life be an intelligent choicea tim e well used to gain a desired end? N ot alone in th e vapors of te s t tubes, or th e m isty voids of th e telescope, will m an find the answ er to the riddle of life and th a t course of living which brings m astery of self and happiness, but in the dep ths of his own being.

    T he surges of self which the em otions well up w ithin you, the flashes of in tu ition which break t hrough your consciousness in spite of superfluous interests are th e signs which po in t a way to con tac t w ith in fin ityth e prim ary cause of all. C ertain ly you are not nor are men generallyaverse to brilliance of mind, to creative ideas which make for ac com plishm ent, and have the ir worldly co un te rpart in dem ands for your personal services and success in any enterprise.

    Therefore, le t the Rosicrucians (not a religious organization), an age-old, worldwide fra te rn ity , reveal to you th e simple m ethods used by th e sages and m aster th inkers of yore for shaping th e elem ents of your environm ent in to a world of personal achievem ent. T his knowledge goes beyond m ere fa ith or belief. It is the ageless science of life, which has accounted for m ost o f the w orlds g reatest th inkers and doers.

    ACCEPT THIS GIFT BOOHIf you are not content with life as you find it, The Rosicrucians invite you to use the coupon below and secure the fascinating book, The Mastery of Lifewithout cost or obligation. This book tells how you may receive these forceful and eternal truths which make for better living.

    USE THIS RIFT COUPONSCRIBE'. S.P.C.The Rosicrucians (amokc)San Jose, California

    Please send free copy of "The M astery of Life", which I shall read as directed.

    N ame...................................................................................

    Address........................................................

    C ity..................................................State ..

    Thn II (1 S 11* n II Cl A INI S , [A Ml) l i e ) S A IV JIISE, CALI F. (JVof a religious organization?

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    ROSICRUCIAN DIGESTCO VERS THE W O RLD

    T H E O F F I C I A L I NT E R NAT I ONAL ROS I CRUC I AN M A G A Z I N E O F T H E W O R L D - W I D E R O S I C R U C I A N O R D E R

    SEPTEMBER, 1953

    Rose-Croix University Graduates (Frontispiece) Thought of the Month: A School of Humanism Strange Phenomena: The Mind Reader Part Two Teachings of Jacob Boehme The 1953 International ConventionFact . . . Or Fancy: Telling the Bees...................The Nervous ChildCathedral Contacts: The Voice of History.Solving our Problems by SuicideVitality Means Life...........................Temple Echoes Is Beauty Relative?Mystical Thought in English Literature Convention Conference (Illustration) ..

    Subscription to the Rosicrucian Digest, $3.00 (1/1/5 sterling) per year. Single copies 30 cents (2/2 sterling).

    Entered as Second Class M atter at the Post O ffice at San Jose, C a lifornia, under Section 1103 of the U. S. Postal A c t of O ct. 3, 1917.

    Changes of address must reach us by the first of the month preceding date of issue.

    Statements made in this publication are not the official expression of the organization or its officers unless stated to be official communications.

    Published Monthly by the Supreme Council ofTHE R O S IC R U C IA N ORDER A M O R C

    ROSICRUCIAN PARK SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIAEDITOR: Frances Vejtasa

    Copyright, 1953, by the Supreme Grand Lodge of AM O RC , Inc. All rights reserved.

  • TheRosicrucianDigestSeptember1 9 5 3

    n impartial observer peering at man from afar, with his natural vision, unhampered by the colored glasses which the religious sects and ethical philosophies offer, would find him very much an animal. Shorn of his titles

    and his illusionary station in life, and nude, man is a rather ignoble specimen of living matter. True, he is far more complex than the amoeba, and he has come a great way from the amphioxus, the most primitive of all vertebrates. However, beside the sleek panther, the graceful deer, and the mighty elephant, he stands as a rather poor relation. Physically, compared with the magnificent mammals with which the world abounds, he is a rather pathetic member of the animal family.

    It does not mitigate this opprobrium of him to acclaim his great mental traits, for by the simple kick of the toe one may unearth an anthill in which may bo seen feats performed by these minute creatures which amazingly parallel some of the humans intellectual achievements. Beavers, bees, and many birds likewise have remarkable faculties for using and mastering the things of their environment. They preserve their kind and instinctively find and use in nature many elements as curative properties. Mans animal and insect kin can build dams and bridges, organize armies, subordinate other creatures, make slaves of them for their own purposes; they can hoard food and manufacture needed articles from those which nature provides them. They can hunt, fish, and even cultivate their food.

    The greater brain of man is no more to his individual credit as an organ of use and dependence than the webfoot is to a duck, or the elongated neck to a giraffe. His inferiority in certain attributes forced specialized development in others so that he could survive in the environment in which he found himself. Man particularly stresses the use of his brain because he has little else to use. The fact that he can resort to abstraction, contemplation of things which have no reality or which lie has not yet actually objectively experienced, is a natural consequent of his own special function, or brain. One may admire the fleetness of deer, but one would hardly compliment them for their natural instinctive use of their principal advantage over a hostile environment. So why flatter man for relying upon and thereby developing the only safeguard he has?

    If man is truly a superior being, it most certainly must be shown in other ways than the development of his physical senses or the processes of his imagination, or that he can devise more complicated ways of living and of providing his sustenance. A mountain goat is so constituted as to be able to climb precipitous cliffs to find the shelter and agreeable surroundings it seeks, and nothing more could be offered to bring it greater satisfaction. Wherein does man differ from the mountain goat if he uses his special powers, his intelligence, to attain the same end? Obviously, then, it is not how an animate being acquires the things necessary fo