pioneer, delhi friday 18th december 2015, page:...

Click here to load reader

Post on 19-Aug-2018

212 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Pioneer, DelhiFriday 18th December 2015, Page: 3Width: 25.08 cms, Height: 12.70 cms, a4r, Ref: pmin.2015-12-18.27.23

  • Deccan Herald, DelhiFriday 18th December 2015, Page: 8Width: 8.28 cms, Height: 15.50 cms, a4, Ref: pmin.2015-12-18.39.84

  • Hindu, DelhiFriday 18th December 2015, Page: 5Width: 4.83 cms, Height: 18.03 cms, a4, Ref: pmin.2015-12-18.45.42

  • Indian Express, DelhiFriday 18th December 2015, Page: 5Width: 8.30 cms, Height: 20.73 cms, a4, Ref: pmin.2015-12-18.37.40

  • Hindustan, DelhiFriday 18th December 2015, Page: 3Width: 9.20 cms, Height: 7.21 cms, a4, Ref: pmin.2015-12-18.34.12

  • Hindu, ChennaiThursday 17th December 2015, Page: 9Width: 8.30 cms, Height: 12.04 cms, a4, Ref: pmin.2015-12-18.8.17

  • Times of India, DelhiFriday 18th December 2015, Page: 21Width: 4.23 cms, Height: 17.23 cms, a4, Ref: pmin.2015-12-18.47.173

  • Dainik Jagran, DelhiFriday 18th December 2015, Page: 11Width: 5.08 cms, Height: 9.74 cms, a4, Ref: pmin.2015-12-18.33.65

  • The NHRC has issued a notice to the Union Ministry of Defence over security risk to the city of Jabalpur in Madhya Pradesh. Bhopal, Dec 17, 2015, DHNS: The notice was issued after taking suo motu cognizance of a media report that the spontaneous combustion of thousands of unexploded and rejected bombs, which are buried and awaiting disposal at the Ordinance Factory, Khamaria has posed risk to the city. The factory is located in a densely populated area. Giving two weeks time to the Defence Secretary to respond with a factual report, Justice D Murugesan has observed that the contents of the press report, if true, raise a serious issue of violation of right to life and right to health of the workers and local residents, National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) said in a press release. According to the media report, carried on the 14th December, 2015, Jabalpur city also happens to be quake prone and the danger can be huge given reports of sporadic explosions in the premises in the last few years. The latest was on the 11th December, 2015 when two employees were injured. Besides, explosives from 1999 Kargil War, a stockpile of unexploded and rejected bombs are also awaiting disposal at the Ordinance Factory, it said. While referring to the variety of mortars, shells and explosives stored, the report also mentions that the detonators have corroded to the point where it is dangerous to defuse them and there was a risk of spontaneous combustion due to rapid deterioration of the duds.

  • NHRC notice to defence ministry over

    ammunition stockpile

    ByIANS |Thursday, December 17, 2015 - 22:26

    New Delhi: The NHRC has issued notice to the defence ministry over the safety risk posed to the general public due to army ammunition stockpiled in Jabalpur in Madhya Pradesh.

    The National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) took suo motu cognizance of a media report and directed the defence secretary to respond with a factual report in two weeks on the issue.

    In a statement issued on Thursday, the human rights body said there was a risk of spontaneous combustion of thousands of unexploded and rejected bombs that were buried in and awaiting disposal at the Ordnance Factory at Khamaria in Jabalpur. The factory is located in a densely populated area.

    "The contents of the press report, if true, raise a serious issue of violation of right to life and right to health of the workers and local residents," The NHRC statement said.

    According to the media report, Jabalpur city happens to be quake-prone and the danger can be huge given the reports of sporadic explosions in the said premises in the last few years, the statement added.

  • Delhi demolition drive: NHRC team visits Shakurbasti site On December 12, Northern Railways demolished nearly 1,200 shanties in an anti-encroachment drive, leaving at least 2,500 people homeless.

    December 18, 2015 3:43 am

    A three-member team of National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) Thursday visited the site where Shakurbasti once stood to take a stock of the situation. On December 12, Northern Railways demolished nearly 1,200 shanties in an anti-encroachment drive, leaving at least 2,500 people homeless. The NHRC team including Anil Kumar Parashar and Srinivasa Kamath inspected the site and interviewed the residents with a questionnaire on the demolition. The questions were to know the details of the residents, their family background and their identification cards, among other information. The NHRC officials said the objective was to check the ground reality. Many people were rendered homeless after the demolition. The team also inspected the amenities being provided by the government. We have served a notice on the Northern Railways if all procedures were followed before the demolition, said Parashar, joint registrar (law) and focal point, Human Rights Defenders, NHRC. Parashar added that a questionnaire was also submitted to the police on the demands made by the Railways on the issue to them before the demolition was carried out. We will analyse the inputs by the authorities as well as the residents and then make our report on the issue, said Parashar

  • NHRC notice to state over Jaduguda Jaideep Deogharia,TNN | Dec 18, 2015, 09.05 AM IST, Ranchi RANCHI: The rich uranium mines of Jaduguda, shut since September 2014, is likely to bring trouble to the state government with the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) taking cognizance in its own motion over media reports about Jaduguda causing nuclear pollution . Based on a Huffington post report, NHRC has issued notices to the secretary of the central department of atomic energy; chairman of Uranium Corporation of India limited (UCIL) and state chief secretary calling for submission of reports within two weeks. The report published in the Huffington post had stated that amid the government apathy, radioactive and toxic waste has been leaking from India's oldest uranium mine at Jaduguda affecting people, livestock, rivers, forests and agricultural produce in the area. Justice D Murugesan, a member of NHRC observed that the contents of the press report, if true, raise a serious issue of violation of rights of the health of the workers and local residents, apart from damage to the environment. "It appears from the report that adequate measures have not been taken to prevent toxic leaks from the site by India's nuclear establishment, which has systematically overlooked evidence that points to a radiation hazard," an official communique released by the NHRC reads. The commission in its letter has mentioned clearly that the media report is based on the account of local people, studies conducted by independent individuals and agencies since 1990 and a series of cases filed in courts saying that mining has exposed workers and villagers to radiation, heavy metals and other carcinogens, including arsenic. Toxins were leaking into underground aquifers and the Subernarekha river could be contaminating the food chain from fish to vegetables. Sources in the NHRC said a report from all concerned parties will help in identifying the fault lines as to what went wrong despite stringent laws being in place to avoid nuclear pollution. Jaduguda mines have been closed down for the want of necessary environment and forest clearances since September 2014, following an order of the Supreme Court which restricted mining from any mine based on deemed licenses. Senior forest officials admit that the UCIL authorities have taken a long time in furnishing required documents that were sought for issuing clearances. "We have examined the documents, but physical verification is necessary to find out if the documents and the ground reality are congruent," said a forest officials.

  • Centre, J'khand govt get NHRC notice on toxic mine wastePress Trust of India | New Delh

    The National Human Rights Commission has issued notices to Centre and Jharkhand government over reported apathy towards checking the radioactive and toxic waste leaking from a mine in Jaduguda.

    The Commission has taken suo motu cognisance of a media report quoting a study which has claimed that radioactive and important Uranium mine at Jaduguda, East Singhbhum district, Jharkhand, affecting people, livestock, rivers, forests and agriculture

    The media report has quoted the study by measures have not been taken to prevent toxic leaks from the site by India's nuclear establishment, which has systematically overhazard,said the NHRC statement. "The contents of the press report, if true, raise a serious issue of violation of rights to hof the workers and local residents, besides damage to theobserved Justice D. Murugesan

    Notices have been issued to Secretary, Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India; Chairman, Uranium Corporat calling for reports within

    State-owned Uranium Corporation of India Ltd. (UCIL) had reportedly beenone thousand tons of uranium ore per day since 1967, which accounted for 20 per cent of the raw material for India's nuclear power generation.

    The mine has, however, been closed since September, 2014, said the NHRC statement.

    As per the report, the study, written by a journalist, relies on accounts of locals, activists, studies which have come out since 1990s and claims filed in courts to say that mining has exposed workers and villagers to radiation, heavy metals and other carcinogenarsenic.

    Toxins were leaching into underground aquifers and the Subarnarekha River could be contaminating the food chain from fish to vegetables, it said.

    Centre, J'khand govt get NHRC notice on toxic mine waste

    New Delhi December 16, 2015 Last Updated at 21:22 IS

    The National Human Rights Commission has issued notices to Centre government over reported apathy towards checking the radioactive and toxic

    waste leaking from a mine in Jaduguda.

    The Commission has taken suo motu cognisance of a media report quoting a study which has claimed that radioactive and toxic waste has been leaking from India's oldest and most important Uranium mine at Jaduguda, East Singhbhum district, Jharkhand, affecting

    forests and agriculture produce in the area.

    The media report has quoted the study by a US-basednews organisation that adequate measures have not been taken to prevent toxic leaks from the site by India's nuclear establishment, which has systematically overlooked evidence that point

    statement.

    "The contents of the press report, if true, raise a serious issue of violation of rights to hof the workers and local residents, besides damage to the environment, flora and

    Murugesan Member ,NHRC.

    Notices have been issued to Secretary, Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India; Chairman, Uranium Corporation of India and Chief Secretary, Government of Jharkhand

    within two weeks.

    owned Uranium Corporation of India Ltd. (UCIL) had reportedly beenone thousand tons of uranium ore per day since 1967, which accounted for 20 per cent of the raw material for India's nuclear power generation.

    he mine has, however, been closed since September, 2014, said the NHRC statement.

    the report, the study, written by a journalist, relies on accounts of locals, activists, studies which have come out since 1990s and claims filed in courts to say that mining has exposed workers and villagers to radiation, heavy metals and other carcinogen

    Toxins were leaching into underground aquifers and the Subarnarekha River could be contaminating the food chain from fish to vegetables, it said.

    Centre, J'khand govt get NHRC

    December 16, 2015 Last Updated at 21:22 IST

    The National Human Rights Commission has issued notices to Centre government over reported apathy towards checking the radioactive and toxic

    The Commission has taken suo motu cognisance of a media report quoting a study which toxic waste has been leaking from India's oldest and most

    important Uranium mine at Jaduguda, East Singhbhum district, Jharkhand, affecting

    organisation that adequate measures have not been taken to prevent toxic leaks from the site by India's nuclear

    t points to a radiation

    "The contents of the press report, if true, raise a serious issue of violation of rights to health ment, flora and fauna,

    Notices have been issued to Secretary, Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India; retary, Government of Jharkhand

    owned Uranium Corporation of India Ltd. (UCIL) had reportedly been extracting around one thousand tons of uranium ore per day since 1967, which accounted for 20 per cent of

    he mine has, however, been closed since September, 2014, said the NHRC statement.

    the report, the study, written by a journalist, relies on accounts of locals, activists, studies which have come out since 1990s and claims filed in courts to say that mining has exposed workers and villagers to radiation, heavy metals and other carcinogens, including

    Toxins were leaching into underground aquifers and the Subarnarekha River could be

  • NHRC Issues Notice To Government Over

    HuffPost Report On Nuclear Contamination In

    Jharkhand

    Posted: 16/12/2015 19:51 IST Updated: 16/12/2015 22:47 IST

    NEW DELHI -- The National Human Rights Commission has taken suo motu cognizance of a report from the Centre for Public Integrity, published on Monday byThe Huffington Post. The report, part of a four-part investigative series authored by the journalist Adrian Levy, detailed how Indias nuclear industry has created a 'river of death' in Jadugoda district's Subarnarekha River in Jharkhand. The NHRC has issued notices today to the Secretary, Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India; Chairman, Uranium Corporation of India; and Chief Secretary, Government of Jharkhand, who are expected to furnish reports within two weeks.

    Justice D. Murugesan, present member of NHRC and former Chief Justice of the Delhi High Court, said that if the press report was true, it raised "a serious issue of violation of rights to health of the workers and local residents, besides damage to the environment, flora and fauna".

    According to the report published earlier this week, India's nuclear establishment has systematically overlooked evidence that points at toxic leaks from the site and the resulting radiation hazard to those living around it. This was revealed when a team led by professor Dipak Ghosh, a respected Indian physicist and dean of the Faculty of Science at Jadavpur University in Kolkata, decided to study why locals alleged that the river was poisoned and was routinely causing illnesses in their community.

    When Ghoshs team collected samples from the river and from adjacent wells, seven years ago, he was alarmed by the results. The water was adulterated with radioactive alpha particles that cannot be absorbed through the skin or clothes, but if ingested cause 1,000 times more damage than other types of radiation. In some places, the levels were 160 percent higher than safe limits set by the World Health Organization.

    It was potentially catastrophic, Ghosh said in a recent interview. Millions of people along the waterway were potentially exposed.

    What the professors team uncovered was hard evidence of the toxic footprint of the country's secret nuclear mining and fuel fabrication program. The program is now the subject of a potentially powerful legal action that shines an unusual light on Indias nuclear ambitions and casts a cloud over its future reactor operations.

  • NATIONAL NEWS