mathematics instructional strategies

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Mathematics Instructional Strategies. In the Age of Common Core State Standards. After School Job(4 th /5 th Grade). - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Mathematics Instructional StrategiesIn the Age of Common Core State Standards

  • After School Job(4th/5th Grade)Leonard needed to earn some money so he offered to do some extra chores for his mother after school for two weeks. His mother was trying to decide how much to pay him when Leonard suggested the idea: Either you pay me $1.00 every day for the two weeks, or you can pay me 1 for the first day, 2 for the second day, 4 for the third day, and so on, doubling my pay every day.

  • After School Job(4th/5th Grade)Which option does Leonard want his mother to choose? Write a letter to Leonards mother suggesting the option that she should take. Be sure to include drawings that explain that will explain your mathematical thinking.

  • After School Job(4th/5th Grade)

    DayStart with $1Start with 11$112$123$144$185$1166$1327$1648$1$1.289$1$2.5610$1$5.1211$1$10.2412$1$20.4813$1$40.9614$1$81.92

  • The purpose of this chapter is not to prescribe the usage of any particular instructional strategy, but to enhance teachers repertoire. Teachers have a wide choice of instructional strategies for any given instructional goal, and effective teachers look for a fit between the material to be taught and strategies to teach it. Ultimately, teachers and administrators must decide which instructional strategies are most effective in addressing the unique needs of individual students. Instructional Strategies Chapter

  • The Teaching of Mathematics

    must be carefully sequenced and organized to ensure that all standards are taught at some point and that prerequisite skills form the foundation for more advanced learning. However, it should not proceed in a strictly linear order, requiring students to master each standard completely before being introduced to another. Practice leading toward mastery can be embedded in new and challenging problems that promote conceptual understanding and fluency in mathematics.

  • Instructional Strategies ChapterBefore discussing the many and varied instructional strategies that are at the disposal of teachers, three important topics for CA CCSSM instruction will be discussed: the Key Instructional Shifts of the CA CCSSM, the Standards for Mathematical Practice,the Critical Areas of Instruction at each grade level.

  • Key Instructional ShiftsThe Mathematical Content standards emphasize key content, skills, and practices at each grade level and support three major principles: Focus: Instruction is focused on grade level standards. Coherence: Instruction should be attentive to learning across grades and should link major topics within grades. Rigor: Instruction should develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application.

  • General Instructional Models

    ExplicitInteractiveImplicitTeacher serves as the provider of knowledgeInstruction includes both explicit and implicit methodsTeacher facilitates students learning by creating situations where students discover new knowledge and construct own meaningMuch direct teacher assistanceBalance between direct and non-direct teacher assistanceNon-direct teacher assistanceTeacher regulation of learningShared regulation of learningStudent regulation of learningDirected discoveryGuided discoverySelf-discoveryDirect instructionStrategic instructionSelf-regulated instructionTask AnalysisBalance between part-to-whole and whole-to-partUnit approachBehavioralCognitive/metacognitiveHolistic

  • General Instructional Models5 E Model (interactive)Engage-Explore-Explain-Elaborate-Evaluate3 Phase Model (explicit)I do we d0 you doSingapore Model (interactive)Concept Attainment Model (interactive)Cooperative Learning Model (implicit)Students work together to solve a problem and provide inputCognitively Guided Instruction (implicit)Problem-Based Learning (interactive)

  • Additional Instructional StrategiesDiscourse in the Mathematics ClassroomStudent Engagement StrategiesTools for Mathematics InstructionExamples of Tasks Incorporating Math PracticesReal World Problems

  • Discourse in the Mathematics ClassroomStudents will be expected to communicate their understanding of mathematical concepts, receive feedback, and progress to deeper understanding. When students communicate their mathematical learning through discussions and writing, they are able to relate the everyday language of their world to math language and to math symbols.The process of writing enhances the thinking process by requiring students to collect and organize their ideas. Furthermore, as an assessment tool, student writing provides a unique window to students thoughts and the way a student is thinking about an idea.

  • Discourse StrategiesNumber Talks5 Practices for Orchestrating DiscussionsAnticipating Monitoring Selecting Sequencing Connecting

  • Engagement Strategies

  • Engagement StrategiesAppointment Clock Museum WalkCharadesClues (Barrier Games)Come to Consensus Explores and SettlersFind My RuleFind your PartnerFour CornersGive One Get OneInside Outside CircleJigsawKWLLine Up (Class Building) Making a ListNumbered Heads Together Partner UpQuiz-Quiz TradeSocratic SeminarTalking SticksTeams Share OutThink-Pair-ShareThink-Write-Pair-ShareWhip AroundWrap AroundY-Chart

  • Tools For Mathematics InstructionVisual RepresentationsConcrete ModelsInteractive Technology

  • In Summary General Instructional ModelsAdditional Instructional Strategies

  • General Instructional Models

    ExplicitInteractiveImplicitTeacher serves as the provider of knowledgeInstruction includes both explicit and implicit methodsTeacher facilitates students learning by creating situations where students discover new knowledge and construct own meaningMuch direct teacher assistanceBalance between direct and non-direct teacher assistanceNon-direct teacher assistanceTeacher regulation of learningShared regulation of learningStudent regulation of learningDirected discoveryGuided discoverySelf-discoveryDirect instructionStrategic instructionSelf-regulated instructionTask AnalysisBalance between part-to-whole and whole-to-partUnit approachBehavioralCognitive/metacognitiveHolistic

  • General Instructional Models5 E Model (interactive)3 Phase Model (explicit)Singapore Model (interactive)Concept Attainment Model (interactive)Cooperative Learning Model (implicit)Cognitively Guided Instruction (implicit)Problem-Based Learning (interactive)

  • Additional Instructional StrategiesDiscourse in the Mathematics ClassroomStudent Engagement StrategiesTools for Mathematics InstructionExamples of Tasks Incorporating Math PracticesReal World Problems