evaluating & using sources paraphrase, summary, and citation guidelines

Download Evaluating & Using Sources Paraphrase, Summary, and Citation Guidelines

Post on 19-Dec-2015

213 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Slide 1
  • Evaluating & Using Sources Paraphrase, Summary, and Citation Guidelines
  • Slide 2
  • Types of Sources PRIMARY-something that is firsthand. PRIMARY-something that is firsthand. Examples: interviews, diaries, eyewitness accounts, letters, autobiographies, novels, speeches, case studies SECONDARY SOURCE- writing about primary sources (writing about an author, novel, somebodys accomplishments). -Examples: journal article, analysis of a poem, critical books about authors, newspaper reports
  • Slide 3
  • Types of Sources Periodicals (serialization-magazines, newspapers, and journals) Periodicals (serialization-magazines, newspapers, and journals) Book (Author/s, Corporate Author- encyclopedia/dictionary) Book (Author/s, Corporate Author- encyclopedia/dictionary) Anthology/compilation: series of essays in one book edited by editor(s) Anthology/compilation: series of essays in one book edited by editor(s) Edition: reprinting of a book (usually w/some revisions/updates Edition: reprinting of a book (usually w/some revisions/updates
  • Slide 4
  • Evaluating Sources Print-means its not an internet source Print-means its not an internet source Relevance: Does it address the topic vaguely or specifically? Relevance: Does it address the topic vaguely or specifically? How will it enhance your argument? Ask how the source might help you answer the research question. Check the table of contents, abstract/summaries, the introduction/preface, and the index for subtopics.
  • Slide 5
  • Evaluating Sources Credibility/Ethos: Credibility/Ethos: Is the publisher authoritative (scholarly)? Published by an academic journal, university press, newspapers/magazines (Newsweek/Time), general commercial publishers (Prentice Hall). Is it peer reviewed/refereed? Is the author an expert? Biographical information: look up the author in the biographical dictionary. Look for credentials (academic degree) from an academic institution, research center, laboratory, institute/business.
  • Slide 6
  • Evaluating Sources Is the source current: Check the publication date (it should be no less than 15 years old) Does the source support its information sufficiently? Check the footnotes (more comprehensive), bibliography. Is the authors tone balanced? If the author s tone is objective, uses unbiased language and logical arguments then shes probably useful.
  • Slide 7
  • Evaluating Sources Credibility of the author Credibility of the author To check the credentials of the source look on the Citation Index or search engines (InfoSeek, AltaVista, Dogpile, and Google Groups). Check to see if other scholarly sources cite the source.
  • Slide 8
  • Currency: Is the source current: Currency: Is the source current: Check the publication date (it should be no less than 15 years old). Recent publication-more reliable. Does the source support its information sufficiently? Does the source support its information sufficiently? Check the footnotes (more comprehensive), bibliography. Authors Stance: Is the authors tone balanced? Authors Stance: Is the authors tone balanced? If the author s tone is objective, uses unbiased language and logical arguments then shes probably useful.
  • Slide 9
  • Evaluating Sources Audience: general, specialists, advocates? Audience: general, specialists, advocates? (An authors stance is important) Omissions: Affect the relevancy and credibility of a source. Omissions: Affect the relevancy and credibility of a source. Length: needs to be substantial so that the source is comprehensive enough to use for a research paper. Length: needs to be substantial so that the source is comprehensive enough to use for a research paper. Availability: WSL has Interlibrary Loan (it takes 2 weeks to process requests). Availability: WSL has Interlibrary Loan (it takes 2 weeks to process requests).
  • Slide 10
  • Evaluating On-line Sources Reliable/Credible sites are: Reliable/Credible sites are: From educational, not-for-profit or govt. organizations or a country (.edu,.org,.gov,.us,.uk). Some colleges have student websites (avoid these websites). From expert authors (again check to see if the author has credentials or has other books/articles). *Anonymous authors avoid. User Friendly: Does it have links to other sites? Does it offer background information about the author? User Friendly: Does it have links to other sites? Does it offer background information about the author?
  • Slide 11
  • Evaluating On-line Sources Corroboration: Make sure the source reflects current ideas. Compare it to other sources. Corroboration: Make sure the source reflects current ideas. Compare it to other sources. From reliable print sources. From reliable print sources. New York Times Supported by evidence and presented in a balanced, unbiased manner. Supported by evidence and presented in a balanced, unbiased manner. Currency: Currently/recently updated Currency: Currently/recently updated
  • Slide 12
  • Using Sources: Working Bibliography For Print Sources document: For Print Sources document: Authors name Title of the book or periodical and article Publisher City of publication Date of publication Volume number Issue Exact page numbers (if electronic-paragraph #s) JSTOR is an exception
  • Slide 13
  • Using Sources: Working Bibliography Electronic Sources Electronic Sources Name of the database or online source Full electronic address (URL) The date the document was first produced The date the document was published on the Web (Version #/Revision date) Date you accessed the document
  • Slide 14
  • Imbedding Sources Signal Words and Signal Verbs Signal Words and Signal Verbs Always introduce the authors name in a sentence the first time you use that source. Use signal verbs to characterize the authors [] viewpoint [] as well as your own (417).
  • Slide 15
  • Quotations 3 REASONS to use a quote 3 REASONS to use a quote Wording is so memorable that it cannot be improved or paraphrased Author is a well-respected authority and their opinion corroborates yours Author challenges/disagrees w/others in the field
  • Slide 16
  • Quotations Use quotations for >4 lines Use quotations for >4 lines Block the quote if 4+ lines (MLA) Block the quote if 4+ lines (MLA) Block the quote if 40 words + (APA) Block the quote if 40 words + (APA) Do not use more than of the page for quotes Do not use more than of the page for quotes Specific guidelines for quoting p. 419 Specific guidelines for quoting p. 419
  • Slide 17
  • Quotations Always introduce the authors name in a sentence the first time you use that source. Always introduce the authors name in a sentence the first time you use that source. Mention the title of the work and if the author is a respected authority add that information Mention the title of the work and if the author is a respected authority add that information Always add YOUR introductory analysis of the quotedont make the reader work hard to make the connection Always add YOUR introductory analysis of the quotedont make the reader work hard to make the connection
  • Slide 18
  • Quotations Examples on pg. 167 QA Examples on pg. 167 QA Use brackets [ ] when you add a word/two Use ellipses when you delete words from the sentence
  • Slide 19
  • Using Sources Differentiate between the sources ideas and yours. You must avoid appropriating or channeling other peoples ideas and words. Differentiate between the sources ideas and yours. You must avoid appropriating or channeling other peoples ideas and words. A great way to avoid plagiarism is to take notes on the source and then write down your ideas and criticisms about the source and keep these together. A great way to avoid plagiarism is to take notes on the source and then write down your ideas and criticisms about the source and keep these together.
  • Slide 20
  • Paraphrase Restates in your words the idea/s from a source. The key component of the paraphrase is reading comprehension; you can not paraphrase if you DO NOT understand the passage. The paraphrase should be similar in length to the same source. Restates in your words the idea/s from a source. The key component of the paraphrase is reading comprehension; you can not paraphrase if you DO NOT understand the passage. The paraphrase should be similar in length to the same source. Do NOT include your analysis, evaluation, or critique Do NOT include your analysis, evaluation, or critique http://papyr.com/hypertextbooks/comp2/s amppara.htm http://papyr.com/hypertextbooks/comp2/s amppara.htm
  • Slide 21
  • Paraphrase Paraphrasing Guidelines p. 420 (EA) & 169 (QA) Paraphrasing Guidelines p. 420 (EA) & 169 (QA) Highlight of the Guidelines Highlight of the Guidelines Use to elucidate difficult material Dont use a paraphrase as a substitute for the thesis statement Substituting synonyms for original words is NOT the correct way to paraphrase. Rearrange sentenes Integrate the paraphrase into your writing Credit original source
  • Slide 22
  • Summary Condensed, shortened version of the original material. It highlights the main points but isnt as specific as the paraphrase. Condensed, shortened version of the original material. It highlights the main points but isnt as specific as the paraphrase. Guidelines on Summary p. 420 (EA) and p.171 (QA) Guidelines on Summary p. 420 (EA) and p.171 (QA)
  • Slide 23