Elements of Art Line Shape Form Space Value Color Texture.

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  • Slide 1
  • Elements of Art Line Shape Form Space Value Color Texture
  • Slide 2
  • Line
  • Slide 3
  • Point Every line starts with a single point. In Math, a point has no dimensions, just a position in space. In art, even the smallest point has mass and can be seen. A work of art can be created by only using points Every line starts with a single point. In Math, a point has no dimensions, just a position in space. In art, even the smallest point has mass and can be seen. A work of art can be created by only using points
  • Slide 4
  • Pointillist painting by Georges Seurat, French, Sunday Afternoon on the Grand Jatte, 1884-1886
  • Slide 5
  • Australian Aboriginal Art
  • Slide 6
  • Line A Line is created by connecting Point A_____B. Line has one dimension, length Line has movement It can be geometric or organic Line can have emphasis and contrast Line can show pattern and rhythm Line can show unity Line can show balance (symmetrical or asymmetrical) It can create a mood or express emotion and it can have color or texture (line quality)
  • Slide 7
  • Organic lines are wavy and curvy. Organic means relating to or derived from living things
  • Slide 8
  • Geometric lines are angular and straight
  • Slide 9
  • Lines can express moods or emotion through movement. Movement in art means suggested direction or motion
  • Slide 10
  • Line can express Mood through Movement Restful Active Tension Flowing HorizontalDiagonal Vertical Diagonal
  • Slide 11
  • Line can show direction (movement) and lead the eye through the composition. Composition refers to the way the parts or elements of a work of art are arranged on the page
  • Slide 12
  • Lines create movement in this composition and direct the eye around the page.
  • Slide 13
  • Line - Emphasis and Contrast. Contrast is where part of a line is different than the rest of the line. Emphasis means there is a focal point or one part that really stands out from the rest.
  • Slide 14
  • Lines can show pattern and rhythm. Pattern is created through repetition of elements. In art visual rhythm refers to the arrangement of a pattern to create movement
  • Slide 15
  • Pattern can be regular or irregular Regular pattern is created when the elements making up the pattern are repeated at regular intervals.
  • Slide 16
  • Pattern Irregular pattern is when the elements making up the pattern are repeated at irregular intervals
  • Slide 17
  • When lines show pattern or rhythm they are unified. Unity is created through repetition. Unity means some elements within the composition are repeated, look good together and tie the composition together.
  • Slide 18
  • Line - Movement, repetition, unity
  • Slide 19
  • Line can show balance. When we talk about balance in art, we mean visual weight on either side of a line drawn down the middle of a composition. Line 1 shows symmetrical balance. Line 2 shows asymmetrical balance. 1 2
  • Slide 20
  • Symmetrical balance means the composition shows an identical mirror image on each side of the line
  • Slide 21
  • Asymmetrical balance means the composition is balanced, but the image is not exactly the same on both sides.
  • Slide 22
  • Line can be combined with other elements of art such as color to create more interest.
  • Slide 23
  • Lines can be textured
  • Slide 24
  • Or Lines can be used together to create Texture
  • Slide 25
  • Lines can Organize space
  • Slide 26
  • Line can be used to Communicate an idea in an advertising campaign
  • Slide 27
  • Line - Communicate an idea
  • Slide 28
  • Draw on your worksheet: Open Photoshop. 1 Do the line worksheet in your packet using lines to illustrate each of the Principles of Design. Use the pencil, brush, line tool or pen tool to do exercises 1-9 on an 8.5X11 document. Save as a JPEG or PDF. Put in the drop box in Moodle.
  • Slide 29
  • Meanings of colors Red anger, passion,blood, war, appetite Blue calm, spiritual, emotional,water, deep Yellow happy, excited, sun, rich, jazz Green calm, nature, peace, money, sickness Purple royalty, wealth, privilege, passion Orange, bright, unique, happy, sun
  • Slide 30
  • Shape Turn to page 1 in your packet A shape is created by drawing a line starting at point A and ending at point A. Definition of a shape: an area enclosed by a boundary line A shape is two dimensional. It has height and length Shapes can be organic or geometric Shapes can be symmetrical or asymmetrical A shape can be representational or non- representational Shapes can create a figure-ground relationship
  • Slide 31
  • Shape It can separate and organize space into Positive and negative Shape can sustain interest Creates figure/ground relationship
  • Slide 32
  • Shape The square was created by drawing a line beginning at point A and ending at point B creating an enclosed area that has height and length A.BA.B
  • Slide 33
  • Shape Two dimensional (flat, planar) Organic shapes come from nature and are rounded Geometric shapes are mathematical and have angles
  • Slide 34
  • Symmetrical shapes are mirror images when divided in half
  • Slide 35
  • Asymmetrical shapes are not mirror images when divided in half
  • Slide 36
  • Shape Representational shapes hold our attention Non-Representational (or non-objective) shapes are important in design and in the background of compositions.
  • Slide 37
  • Representational shapes represent an actual object or being
  • Slide 38
  • Non-representational shapes do not represent things, they are just shapes
  • Slide 39
  • Shapes can Organize space and create a figure/ground relationship
  • Slide 40
  • Shapes create Interest in a composition
  • Slide 41
  • Line used with Shape in compositions
  • Slide 42
  • Blocks of words can create Shapes
  • Slide 43
  • Shapes can create optical illusions
  • Slide 44
  • Optical illusion
  • Slide 45
  • Shape & Space Shapes can create Positive & Negative Space We can talk about the relationship of positive negative space as figure/ground relationships
  • Slide 46
  • Space is either Positive or Negative Positive white space Positive space is filled up or occupied Negative red space around the shark It is unoccupied or empty
  • Slide 47
  • Figure/Ground There are three types of Figure/Ground, positive/negative space Relationships 1.Stable 2.Reversible 3.Ambiguous
  • Slide 48
  • Shape - Stable The two dimensional shape is perceived in an unchanging relationship of positive object against negative background
  • Slide 49
  • Shape - Stable
  • Slide 50
  • 1910 poster by Emile Preetorius There is a lot of tension between the figure ground relationship-- which makes this image exciting.
  • Slide 51
  • Shape - Reversible Figure and ground can be focused on equally
  • Slide 52
  • Shape - Reversible
  • Slide 53
  • Shape - Ambiguous In some puzzle pictures, one figure may turn out to be made up of another, or of several different pictures.
  • Slide 54
  • Simplification from realistic to simplified positive/ negative
  • Slide 55
  • Positive/Negative Turn to page 14 in your packet. Choose 3 words or make up your own. Do 4 thumbnail sketches for each Show the thumbnails to your teacher We will choose the best of each of the 4 and you will draw the best in black marker in the larger rectangles
  • Slide 56
  • Worksheet assignment: Find a realistic photograph of a person or an animal. Simplify into a positive/ negative design. Show your teacher and we will crop it and make it into a black and white design. Below is finished woman
  • Slide 57
  • Magazine Layout Search Pg. 11 Symmetrical balance Asymmetrical balance Radial balance and movement Horizontal Movement Diagonal Movement Vertical Movement Positive/Negative space Repetition/Pattern/Unity Contrast Emphasis or Focal Point Golden Mean layout

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