dr. william allan kritsonis, dissertation chair for rebecca duong, dissertation proposal defense ppt

Download Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Rebecca Duong, Dissertation Proposal Defense PPT

Post on 15-Jun-2015

435 views

Category:

Education

0 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, Dissertation Chair for Rebecca Duong, Dissertation Proposal Defense PPT.

TRANSCRIPT

  • 1. A Study of the Factors Related tothe Academic Achievement of 8th GradeLimited Proficient StudentsIn A Major Urban School DistrictA Dissertation ProposalPresented byRebecca DuongDissertation CommitteeWilliam Allan Kritsonis, PhD., ChairDavid Herrington, PhD., MemberDonald R. Collins, PhD., MemberDr. Solomon Osho, Ph.D., MemberNovember 19, 2008

2. Proposal FormatI. IntroductionII. Background of the ProblemIII. Purpose of the StudyIV. Research QuestionsV. Review of LiteratureVI. Research Design 3. IntroductionNCLB legislation requires all students enrolled inpublic schools be proficient in Math and Reading by2014.In Texas, TAKS proficiency standards must be metby all groups including Hispanic LEP students, howwill schools be ready? 4. IntroductionIn Texas there is a increase of more than 55% ofHispanics making up the overall population ofmiddle school public school enrollment in 2007.(National Center for Education Statistics. 2007)Research stresses the importance of recognizing LEPstudents in middle school come with uniquestrengths, challenges, and needs. 5. Background of ProblemAdministrators and teachers face new challenges aschanging demographics have Texas educators andleaders finding new ways to implement federal andstate policies concerning LEP (Limited EnglishProficient) education (Gulla, 2003). 6. Background of the ProblemPublished studies and state reports in Texas discussthe implications of the increasing rate of illiteracy inthe Hispanic community due to dropout rates inmiddle and high school.According to Rumberger and Lamb (2003),Understanding why students drop out of school is adifficult if not an impossible task because, as withother forms of educational achievement, it isinfluenced by an array of individual and institutionalfactors (p. 147), factors which are school andindividual related. 7. Statement of the ProblemAs a result of the dropout rate of Hispanics, manyTexans are not fully able to participate in theemerging new economy because of limited literacyskills, limited English-speaking skills and a generalneed for other basic skills (Haynes, 1998; Jones,2001).There is a need to determine if 8thLEP Hispanicstudents perceptions of school factors and/orindividual factors may affect their academicachievement. 8. Purpose of the StudyThe study has a threefold purpose.First, its seeks to determine school factors that effectthe academic achievement of 8thgrade Hispanic LEPstudents.Second, it seeks to determine individual factors thateffect the academic achievement of 8thgrade HispanicLEP students. 9. Purpose of the Study (cont.)Finally, it seeks to identify how these identifiablefactors are perceived by Hispanic limited Englishproficient 8thgrade middle school students aspositively influencing their academic achievement. 10. Research Questions1. Is there a significant relationship between thestudents academic achievement and theirperceptions of the importance of a positive schoolclimate?2. Is there a significant relationship between thestudents academic achievement and theirperceptions of the importance of a positiveclassroom environment? 11. Research Questions (cont.)3. Is there a significant relationship of the studentsacademic achievement and their perceptions of theimportance of LEP instruction?4. Is there a significant relationship of the studentsacademic achievement and the students motivationto achieve?5. Is there a significant relationship of the studentsacademic achievement and the students socialgoals? 12. Research Questions (cont.)6. What is the relationship of the students academicachievement and the combined responses to theirperceptions of the importance of: school climate classroom environment quality of LEP instruction motivation to achieve individual social goals 13. Research Questions (cont.)7. What relationships exist between the studentspersonal background and demographiccharacteristics and their perceptions of theimportance of: school climate classroom environment quality LEP instruction motivation to achieve individual social goals 14. Null HypothesisH01: There is no statistically significant relationshipbetween the students academic achievement andtheir perceptions of the importance of a positiveschool climate as measured by the AcademicAchievement Survey .H02: There is no statistically significant relationshipbetween of the students academic achievement andtheir perceptions of the importance of a positiveclassroom environment as measured by the AcademicAchievement Survey . 15. Null HypothesisH03: There is no statistically significant relationship ofthe students academic achievement and theirperceptions of the importance of LEP instructionasmeasured by the Academic Achievement Survey .H04: There is no statistically significant relationship ofthe students academic achievement and the studentsmotivation to achieve as measured by the AcademicAchievement Survey .H05: There is no statistically significant relationship ofthe students academic achievement and thestudents social goals as measured by the AcademicAchievement Survey . 16. Null HypothesisH06: There is no statistically significant relationship ofthe students academic achievement and thecombined responses to their perceptions of theimportance of:school climateclassroom environmentquality of LEP instructionmotivation to achieveindividual social goals 17. Null HypothesisH07: There are no statistically significant relationshipsbetween the students personal background anddemographic characteristics and their perceptions ofthe importance of:school climateclassroom environmentquality of LEP instructionmotivation to achieve individual social goals 18. Theoretical Frame of ReferenceSchool ClimateResearchers have identified the following characteristics thatinfluence school climate: Safe and orderly environment (Murphy, 1989; Jones, 2001) Opportunities for student participation and leadership(Rumberger et al., 2000; Wynne, 1980) High expectations for students (Edmunds, 1979; Rumberger etal., 2000) Student-staff cohesion and support of differences (Wynne,1980; Martinez, 2001) 19. Theoretical Frame of ReferenceClassroom EnvironmentPiagets theory of a constructivist framework will beused in this investigation to describe a positiveclassroom environment(Fogarty, 1999; McMullen, 2004). 20. Theoretical Frame of ReferenceQuality of LEP InstructionLEP instruction improves the education of LEPchildren, by assisting them to learn English and meetchallenging state academic content and studentacademic achievement standards(Cummins, 1980; 1981; 1996; Jones, 2005). 21. Theoretical Frame of ReferenceMotivation To AchieveMotivation plays a fundamental role in a studentsachievement ability(Brophy, 1985; Drnyei, 1994; Holden, 2001). 22. Theoretical Frame of ReferenceIndividual Social GoalsLearning to socialize is a natural step towards socialdevelopment also an important factor forassimilation into society(Deci & Ryan, 1985:116; Matthews, 2003). 23. Academic Achievement of 8th Grade Hispanic LEP StudentsBased on School and Individual Factors 24. Significance of the StudyDevelop an awareness of the perceptions of factorsthat will positively or negatively affect the academicachievement of middle school 8thgrade Hispanic LEPstudents.Determine which school and individual factors arepositive impacts on 8thgrade Hispanic LEP studentsacademic achievement while impacting future policydecisions related to services to LEP students inmiddle school.Ultimately influence program decisions to maximizethe learning outcomes of 8thgrade Hispanic LEPstudents. 25. Assumptions Data gathered from the participants will be factual. LEP students participating will be classified as 8thgrade LEP students in school currently enrolled. LEP students who participate in the personalessays and questions will be truthful and objectivein their responses. Responses in the study will be accurately recordedand appropriately coded. Results of this study will help school leaders tomore effectively implement federal and statepolicies concerning LEP (Limited EnglishProficient) education. 26. Limitations of the StudyResearch will reflect one urban school district inTexas.Data collected will be obtained from five middleschools within the selected urban school district. 27. Chapter IIReview of Literature 28. School FactorsSchool Climate-Characteristics of schools can affect and help define the climate ofthe school.-Researchers have identified the following characteristics thatinfluence school climate:*Safe and orderly environment(Murphy, 1985; Knippel, 2001)*Opportunities for student participation and leadership(Rutter et al., 1979; Wynne, 1980; Matthews,2004)*High expectations for students(Edmunds, 1979; Rutter et al., 1979, Sykes, 2001)*Student-staff cohesion and support of differences(Wynne ,1980; Matthews, 2006) 29. School FactorsClassroom Environment-Piagets theory of a constructivist framework will be used in thisinvestigation to describe a positive classroom environment.-A constructivist framework encompass around a curriculumdesign consisting of discovery learning (Fogarty, 1999; Ewing,2005).-In a constructivist classroom, learning is not simply taking in newinformation as it exists eternally, it is the natural, continuousconstruction and reconstruction of new, richer, and morecomplex and connected meanings by the learner (Poplin, 1988;Jones, 2003). 30. School FactorsQuality of LEP Instruction-LEP instruction improves the education of LEP children inassisting them to learn English and meet challenging stateacademic content and student academic achievement standards(Cummins, 1980; 1981; 1996; Rocha, 2003)-This research will track Reading TAKS scores of participating8th grade LEP Hispanic students who are enrolled in ESLclassrooms after their 3rd year of enrollment in public school.-Quality LEP instruction involves the development andimplementation of language educational ins

Recommended

View more >