Dissertation Chair Dr. William Allan Kritsonis & Steven Norfleet

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Dr. William Allan Kritsonis & Steven Norfleet In 2004, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis was recognized as the Central Washington University Alumni Association Distinguished Alumnus for the College of Education and Professional Studies. Dr. Kritsonis was nominated by alumni, former students, friends, faculty, and staff. Final selection was made by the Alumni Association Board of Directors. Recipients are CWU graduates of 20 years or more and are recognized for achievement in their professional field and have made a positive contribution to society. For the second consecutive year, U.S. News and World Report placed Central Washington University among the top elite public institutions in the west. CWU was 12th on the list in the 2006 On-Line Education of Americas Best Colleges.

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<ul><li> 1. A STUDY OF EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS PRACTICES IMPORTANT TO THE ACHIEVEMENT OF THE AFRICAN AMERICAN LEARNER A Proposal Presentation by Steven Norfleet October 2008 </li> <li> 2. Dissertation Committee Members <ul><li>William Allan Kritsonis, Ph.D. </li></ul><ul><li>(Dissertation Chair) </li></ul><ul><li>David E. Herrington, Ph.D. </li></ul><ul><li>(Member) </li></ul><ul><li>Ronald Howard, Ph.D. </li></ul><ul><li> (Member) </li></ul><ul><li>Wanda Johnson, Ph.D. </li></ul><ul><li> (Member) </li></ul></li> <li> 3. Research Outline <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Background of the Problem </li></ul><ul><li>Statement of the Problem </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of the Study </li></ul><ul><li>Research Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Null Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Significance of the Study </li></ul><ul><li>Review of Literature </li></ul><ul><li>Method of Procedure </li></ul></li> <li> 4. INTRODUCTION <ul><li>Public schools in the United States continue to struggle with the issue of underachievement of the African American learner relative to their White peers (Walker, 2006). </li></ul><ul><li>Educators and researchers alike have attempted to implement many solutions to close the achievement gap. Using primarily top-down approaches, solutions have ranged from improving teacher and administrator qualities, to improving the curriculum, to placing more emphasis on student outcome data, to increasing the rigor in core subjects. </li></ul></li> <li> 5. INTRODUCTION <ul><li>Marzano (2003) asserts, Research in the last 35 years demonstrates that effective schools can have a profound impact on student achievement (p. 8) </li></ul><ul><li>Since the first National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) report card was issued in 1969, African American achievement scores in reading, mathematics, and science among 9, 13, and 17 year olds have averaged some 30 points below their White peers. </li></ul></li> <li> 6. INTRODUCTION <ul><li>Alfred Rovai, Louis Gallien Jr. and Helen Stiff-Williams (2007) present the added complexity in Closing the African American Achievement Gap in Higher Education that closing the achievement gap in elementary and secondary schools has now carried over to higher education. </li></ul></li> <li> 7. INTRODUCTION <ul><li>Gail Thompson (2002) further remarks that because of the increase in pressure on school administrators to meet higher federal and state accountability standards including all of the other responsibilities placed on school administrators, California school leaders are asking, What can we do to improve the academic performance of African American children (p. xvii)? </li></ul></li> <li> 8. INTRODUCTION <ul><li>Hans Luyten, Adrie Visscher, and Bob Witziers (2004) have called for studies on the why and how of the schools perspective in school effectiveness research, and particularly focusing on the classroom and at the campus level. Their research stresses that the ultimate goal of conducting effectiveness research is to identify effective interventions. </li></ul></li> <li> 9. INTRODUCTION <ul><li>Bob Lingard, Jim Ladwig and Allan Luke (as cited in Luyten et al., 2004) point out the black box of schooling needs to be opened with more in-depth, qualitative analyses of processes that actually occur in schools, which they perceive to have a potential influence on school performance (pp. 256-257). </li></ul></li> <li> 10. Background of the Problem <ul><li>In Texas public schools, differences in achievement between African American students and their White peers mirrors the national average. According to the TEA, TAKS (2007) passing rate for African Americans was 55% and their White peers was 82%. </li></ul><ul><li>Few studies have allowed African American students at the high school level to articulate their view on the schooling practices that affect their education, and even fewer have allowed African American freshman college students to articulate their perspective on the practices implemented by school leaders that push the student to achieve. </li></ul></li> <li> 11. Background of the Problem <ul><li>Bush (2002) conducted a study utilizing qualitative methods with African American students in suburban settings to analyze school factors that lead to their success. Student suggestions to school administrators were a designated person to assist with minority student problems, more interaction with the principal and teachers, and get families more involved with students that are having trouble (p. 83). </li></ul></li> <li> 12. Background of the Problem <ul><li>Marzano (2000) states it well when he says If a school can simply identify those variables on which it is not performing well, it can pinpoint and receive the information it needs to improve student achievement (p. 87). </li></ul></li> <li> 13. Background of the Problem <ul><li>Cooper (2000) states If reform-minded educators are serious about closing the achievement gap before several decades pass in the new millennium, we must continue to identify alterable factors in the schooling process that help to promote academic success among all students and particularly students of color (p. 620). </li></ul></li> <li> 14. Statement of the Problem <ul><li>While there is an increase in the number of African American students having success on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills and college readiness tests in Texas high schools, the lack of a significant improvement may be due to the degree of effective schools practices implemented by school leaders. </li></ul></li> <li> 15. Purpose of the Study <ul><li>The purpose of the study is to build highly effective leadership practices of school leaders, which are influential in the academic success of students. </li></ul></li> <li> 16. Purpose of the Study <ul><li>Chubb and Moe (as cited in Marazno, 2003) affirm: </li></ul><ul><li>All things being equal, a student in an </li></ul><ul><li> effectively organized school achieves at </li></ul><ul><li>least a half-year more than a student in an </li></ul><ul><li>ineffectively organized school over the last </li></ul><ul><li>two years of high school. If this difference </li></ul><ul><li>can be extrapolated to the normal four-year </li></ul><ul><li>high school experience, an effectively </li></ul><ul><li>organized school may increase the </li></ul><ul><li>achievement of its students </li></ul><ul><li>by more than one full year (p.8). </li></ul></li> <li> 17. Conceptual Framework ENHANCE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT ENHANCE EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS PRACTICES SAFE AND ORDERLY ENVIRONMENT CLIMATE OF HIGH EXPECTATION FOR SUCCESS CLEAR AND FOCUSED MISSION POSITIVE HOME/SCHOOL RELATIONS FREQUENT MONITORING OF STUDENT PROGRESS OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN, TIME ON TASK INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP </li> <li> 18. Quantitative Research Question #1 <ul><li>How do freshman African American students enrolled in a selected Historically Black College and University (HBCU) rate their former high school campus with regard to each criterion of effective schools identified in the effective schools literature? </li></ul></li> <li> 19. Quantitative Research Question #2 <ul><li>Is there a relationship between the high school characteristics of effective schools rated by freshman African American students enrolled in a selected Historically Black College and University (HBCU) and their post-secondary achievement during their first semester of college in Developmental Education Mathematics? </li></ul></li> <li> 20. Null Hypothesis <ul><li>H 01 - There is no statistically significant relationship between a selected Historically Black College and University (HBCU) freshman African American student ratings of their former high schools effective schools characteristics, and the students first semester of college achievement in a Developmental Education Mathematics course. </li></ul></li> <li> 21. Qualitative Research Question #1 <ul><li>How do African American students report that their former high school campus strives to improve academic achievement by promoting learning for all using instructional leadership ? </li></ul></li> <li> 22. Qualitative Research Question #2 <ul><li>How do African American students report that their former high school campus strives to improve academic achievement by promoting learning for all using clear and focused mission ? </li></ul></li> <li> 23. Qualitative Research Question #3 <ul><li>How do African American students report that their former high school campus strives to improve academic achievement by promoting learning for all using climate of high expectations ? </li></ul></li> <li> 24. Qualitative Research Question #4 <ul><li>How do African American students report that their former high school campus strives to improve academic achievement by promoting learning for all using safe and orderly environment ? </li></ul></li> <li> 25. Qualitative Research Question #5 <ul><li>How do African American students report that their former high school campus strives to improve academic achievement by promoting learning for all using frequent monitoring of student progress ? </li></ul></li> <li> 26. Qualitative Research Question #6 <ul><li>How do African American students report that their high school campus strives to improve academic achievement by promoting learning for all using positive home-school relations ? </li></ul></li> <li> 27. Qualitative Research Question #7 <ul><li>How do African American students report that their former high school campus strives to improve academic achievement by promoting learning for all using opportunity to learn and student time on task ? </li></ul></li> <li> 28. Significance of the Study <ul><li>A constant in schooling, school leadership, teaching and learning, and increased success in student achievement is the effectiveness of the schools program to reach every student at the highest levels. </li></ul></li> <li> 29. Significance of the Study <ul><li> In the 1960s the US led the world in high school qualifications and Korea was 27th. Now Korea leads the world and the US is 13th and falling. As recently as 1995 the US was second in the world on college-level graduation rates; just a decade later it has slipped to 14 th (Barber, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>Given the history of achievement differences between African American students and their White peers, it is central to improve the performance of the education team to achieve greater success in schools. </li></ul><ul><li>This study will seek to enhance the effective schools practices of the education team, by providing a stage for African American students to participate and articulate their views on schooling practices that motivate them to achieve. </li></ul></li> <li> 30. Significance of the Study <ul><li>Results of the study may: </li></ul><ul><li><ul><li>generate new strategies and approaches employed by school leaders that could lead to improved academic achievement in the African American learner; </li></ul></li></ul></li> <li> 31. Significance of the Study <ul><li><ul><li>provide college and university teacher education programs with information on effective schools practices that resonate with the African American learner; </li></ul></li></ul><ul><li><ul><li>For policy makers, results may shed light on funding support and program interventions that African American students say are effective and needed with future generations of African American students. </li></ul></li></ul></li> <li> 32. Significance of the Study <ul><li>The study will provide quantitative and qualitative data to school leaders indicating the impact of an effective high school on the achievement of African American students that are college freshmen. </li></ul></li> <li> 33. Review of Literature <ul><li>Collyn Bray Swanson (2004) examined Safe and Orderly Climate in a study to determine if there was a difference in the performance of military dependent African American students attending a public school and military dependent African American students attending a Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) school. Results indicated students in the DoDEA system scored slightly higher on the ACT college entrance exam than did the students in the public education system. </li></ul></li> <li> 34. Review of Literature <ul><li>Scheerens and Bosker (1997) identified eight characteristics of successful schools in their work entitled The Foundations of Educational Effectiveness. Monitoring of student progress was determined to be a key component to improving achievement. </li></ul><ul><li>Robert Marzano (2003) in What Works in Schools identified five characteristics of highly successful schools, and stresses challenging goals and effective feedback as major components to achieving high expectations . </li></ul></li> <li> 35. Review of Literature <ul><li>Bamburg and Andrews (1990) conducted an investigation specifically looking at the relationships of a clear and focused mission and the role of the principal as the campus instructional leader to the academic achievement of students. Results indicated that the school goal To insure academic excellence showed a significant difference between high achieving and low achieving schools. </li></ul></li> <li> 36. Review of Literature <ul><li>Gentulucci and Muto (2007) conducted a study investigating students perceptions of what principals do to influence their academic achievement. Findings indicated principals that visited classrooms and interacted with students were more influential as instructional leaders than those whose visits were few, short, and passive. Students also indicated that principals that walked around the classroom, checked on their work, and provided gentle advice had more powerful influence on their learning than those sitting in the back of the classroom and observing passively . </li></ul></li> <li> 37. Review of Literature <ul><li>Boscardin et al. (2005) conducted a study to determine how Opportunity To Learn (OTL) variables impact student outcomes and if the effects were consistent across the subjects of English and algebra assessments. One result of the study was content coverage, which was defined by Boscardin as...</li></ul></li></ul>

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