an carraig ed1

of 12/12
The wild Geese are back for the winter. They sit below my house, near old Tarbh Dubh. The geese can fly further, faster to- gether; in fact they save 71% by flying in this formation. It al- lows them to fly from the Arctic, their sum- mer feeding grounds, home, safely togeth- er. They are clever, in that they take turns playing follow the leader, so none get over tired and the flock remains intact until they reach their destination. On the 3 rd November, at the first in the se- ries of meetings on future job opportunities, I questioned why Arran had stopped pulling together as it once had to? I highlighted the stark reality of a dying island, Arran has lost Island Fishermen Keep Up the Fight for Their Rights that legislation has been amended to the benefit of not just is- land fishermen, but to inshore fishermen all along the Donegal coast. The Donegal Island Fishermen Group, which has a strong input from Arranmore Island fishermen, continue to work hard and have been suc- cessful in the sense The island fishermen group was formed in 2006 prior to the ban- ning of salmon fishing and the group lobbied hard to try and con- Welcome to An Carraig, Arranmore’s latest newsletter. Failte Romhat go dti an Carraig The newsletter is to promote the island activities with a focus on its survival and Future Job Opportunities. The newsletter will promote community events, stories and an update for islanders at home and abroad so that we can remain attached wherever we are. We hope it will be a one stop shop for people interested in Arran, its way of life and promoting its future. The newsletter will include stories from abroad that may help the promotion of Arran and its longevity. It will link in with out, and out with in. Contact [email protected] or 00353 85 8555792 or fb Shirley atsyspro The plan is that this will be issued on a quarterly basis and at present it is self funded by Shirley Gallagher, Adrian Begley and Paula Killeen. However, donations are gratefully accepted. Edition 1 Nollaig 2013 More on P2 Are you willing to join the flock? More on page 5 Inside this Issue Arainn in pictures 2013 3 Kids Christmas Party 4 Connecting With www 4 The King of Ar- ranmore 5 Think Global, Act Local 5 Ogham Bond- Island Currency 6 Creating Future Job Opportunities 6/7 Island Council 7 Vision & Objectives of SMILEGOV 7 What is a Sustaina- ble Community? 8/9 Upcoming Meet- ing 9 Towards an Excel- lent Ireland 10 Holyhead 10 Greetings from America 11 Arranmore Utd Gaining Strength 12 Pulling For Gold 12 Island Events 12

Post on 11-Jul-2015

246 views

Category:

Marketing

2 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • The wild Geese are back for the winter. They sit below my house, near old Tarbh Dubh. The geese can fly further, faster to-gether; in fact they save 71% by flying in this formation. It al-lows them to fly from the Arctic, their sum-mer feeding grounds, home, safely togeth-er. They are clever, in that they take turns playing follow the leader, so none get over tired and the

    flock remains intact until they reach their destination.

    On the 3rd November, at the first in the se-ries of meetings on future job opportunities, I questioned why Arran had stopped pulling together as it once had to? I highlighted the stark reality of a dying island, Arran has lost

    Island Fishermen Keep Up the Fight for Their Rights

    that legislation has been amended to the benefit of not just is-land fishermen, but to inshore fishermen all along the Donegal coast.

    The Donegal Island Fishermen Group, which has a strong input from Arranmore Island fishermen, continue to work hard and have been suc-cessful in the sense

    The island fishermen group was formed in 2006 prior to the ban-ning of salmon fishing and the group lobbied hard to try and con-

    Welcome to An Carraig, Arranmores latest newsletter. Failte Romhat go dti an Carraig

    The newsletter is to promote the island activities with a focus on its survival and Future Job Opportunities. The newsletter will promote community events, stories and an update for islanders at home and abroad so that we can remain attached wherever we are. We hope it will be a one stop shop for people interested in Arran, its way of life and promoting its future.

    The newsletter will include stories from abroad that may help the promotion of Arran and its longevity. It will link in with out, and out with in. Contact [email protected] or 00353 85 8555792 or fb Shirley atsyspro

    The plan is that this will be issued on a quarterly basis and at present it is self funded by

    Shirley Gallagher, Adrian Begley and Paula Killeen. However, donations are gratefully accepted.

    Edition 1 Nollaig 2013

    MoreonP2

    Are you willing to join the flock?

    Moreonpage5

    Inside this Issue Arainn in pictures 2013

    3

    Kids Christmas Party

    4

    Connecting With www

    4

    The King of Ar-ranmore

    5

    Think Global, Act Local

    5

    Ogham Bond-Island Currency

    6

    Creating Future Job Opportunities

    6/7

    Island Council 7

    Vision & Objectives of SMILEGOV

    7

    What is a Sustaina-ble Community?

    8/9

    Upcoming Meet-ing

    9

    Towards an Excel-lent Ireland

    10

    Holyhead 10

    Greetings from America

    11

    Arranmore Utd Gaining Strength

    12

    Pulling For Gold 12

    Island Events 12

  • 1000 people in 100 years. This is not a unique prob-lem we have alone, it is a global phenomenon. Peo-ple go to where the jobs are. The jobs are in cities in Dublin, Glasgow, Chica-go and London and Arran people are scattered all over the globe. In fact we flock like geese to the same areas for genera-tions, following in our Fa-thers, Grandfathers and Great Grandfathers foot-steps. The comedian Tommy Tiernan, describes it well when he speaks of the Irish invading coun-tries with a 6 pack, a sleeping bag and the start. We are bred to go. Your children are next, mine has already gone. Times have changed, nowadays we go away with an education yet we still have the island resili-ence, where we will go anywhere, do anything and talk to anyone. These are skills not every-one possesses; we as a people are adaptable.

    The island is turning into a holiday resort, a quaint hideaway to get away from it all for some, and for others to live it up, whilst its islanders get old-er. I came home to rec-ord the stories, before

    Are you willing to join the flock? Continued from front page

    Page 2 An Carraig

    Arran

    has

    lost

    1000

    people

    in 100

    years

    they are lost forever. In July alone there were 4 funerals on the island. In August the opportunity Io revive Arran using the sustainable platform was a possibility, if I stuck my neck out. I did.

    On November the 3rd, I made a statement that if we continue as we have done; we will continue to get what we always have. We will have less than 300 living here in the next 20 years if we con-tinue on the path we are on. Yet there are people that would love to come home, to raise their fami-ly in a safe, secure envi-ronment. I asked the question, can Arran change? Does it want to? I asked the question can we pull together to create a vibrant community, that will benefit all?

    In November, I received a resounding Yes, lets do something posi t ive. Many Islanders supported the future jobs initiative by writing a letter of sup-port as have a number of academic institutions, in-dustry, Donegal County Council, our local authori-ty and elected politicians.

    There are in excess of 130 letters at present with more expected as islanders return home for the holidays. A copy of a draft letter can be obtained from Ionad an Chrois Bheal-aigh. To date there have been 3 meetings (3rd, 21st and 28th No-vember), with action plans listed both here and on facebook. I personally would like to thank both co-ops for the use of the venues and also to those who participated and at-tended the meetings.

    The idea of working together to form a sus-tainable island will take time and agreement from islanders. It is a beacon of hope. It is fragile like all new pro-jects so it needs tend-ing, but lets build on it, le cheile.

  • Page 3 An Carraig

    Arainn in Pictures 2013 Aviva

    BBQin

    Aphort

    OUR

    FUTURE

    Aine,Arran

    Mary2013

  • It is said that internet

    years are like dog years;

    the passing of one year in

    the real world turns to

    seven online. Familiar

    online services and sites

    such as Skype, Google,

    Facebook, Youtube,

    iTunes and others have

    sprung up in the last ten

    years or so and have be-

    come part of our daily

    lives for staying in touch,

    work and relaxation.

    Phone and tablet applica-

    tions are increasingly used

    for everything from speak-

    ing to friends and family

    abroad, banking, booking

    flights, paying our bills to

    playing games.

    This connected world is

    dependent on the rails of

    communication being in

    place; the wires and ca-

    bles that carry all of our

    voices, messages, videos,

    songs and business across

    the country and across

    the globe. Without this

    basic infrastructure we will

    be left behind as everyday

    services that we depend

    on are moved online to

    reduce costs and increase

    speed and efficiency.

    At present there are no

    plans for any of the com-

    panies to provide proper

    wired broadband services

    on the island. We are left

    with a stop gap, a wireless

    service that will not serve

    our needs in only a few

    short years ahead. We

    urgently need to plan and

    pressure the powers that

    be to provide these ser-

    vices, much as the com-

    munity did in the 1950s

    for electricity and in the

    1970s for our water. The

    island recently lost a re-

    turned family of five to

    the mainland through lack

    of these services, we can

    ill afford to lose anyone

    else.

    Seamus Bonner

    land at the time, its still on the go. We raised enough money in the first year to have another par-ty the following year. That tradition has contin-ued as various Moms have managed the party down through the years and the money is still a year ahead. It is so much more professional now with John Greene the DJ and a beautiful grotto by

    I went to the Christmas party for the kids at Ionad an Chrois Bhealaigh. I started a kids Xmas party, 19 years ago, with Marga-ret Baoille, Mary, Anne and Bernadette Boyle be-cause I wanted Elaina to see Santa and the only ones who had a party then was the senior citi-zens. Angela donated a gift from Alaska that couldnt be found in Ire-

    the Begleys, the list of children printed so they know when their turn is to see the man himself and great gifts for the children and the donations for the raffles. I met Mary Frances there, she came from Leitrim to spend time with her family and friends and for her boys to meet Santa and play with their cousins. The young-est baby there was Ruby, Margarets granddaughter, the Arranmore way is alive and well.

    Childrens Christmas Party

    CONNECTING WITH THE WORLD WIDE WEB

    Page 4 An Carraig

    Internet

    years

    are

    like

    dog

    years

  • moss from the shore and regularly hands it out to visitors and locals. His hard working hands still have the craft and skills theyve had all his life as you can see the stone walls he and his best friend Paddy built recently outside his house. There must be royalty in the genes as his granddaughter Aine Rodgers represented Oilean Mary in this years Mary from Dungloe Interna-tional Festival.

    Killeens organised the election and 274 votes were cast throughout the

    On Sunday 4th August Edward Boyle Smiler was crowned the first King of Arranmore. In a land-slide victory Edward received 59.8% of the votes. Edward 84 known to everyone as Smiler is a very popular islander who was wid-owed at a young age and raised three children. He is known for his good humour, friendliness and is an overall gem of a man. He loves to collect dulce and carrageen

    month of July. There was great ex-citement on the day of the crowning ceremony and Hugh Rodgers acted as MC. The ceremony started with a touching slideshow compiled by Hugh ODonnell. The Arranmore Pipe Band played together with local musicians Anne Conaghan, Jamie Neeson, Paddy Gallagher and Con-nie McCauley. Smilers genuine char-acter and good nature shone through all day. It was a heartwarm-ing event filled with community spir-it. Long Live the King!

    Paula Killeen

    The King of Arranmore

    match girl from the Victo-rian times that will be un-heard of in years to come. As many manufacturing jobs and now servicing jobs have moved to China and other Eastern coun-tries, it is apparent we need to create our own opportunities. We need to be able to adapt to the new environment as Dar-

    win explained evolution is the survival of the fittest.

    Arranmore is in a position to lead the way, to think with our heads, feel with our hearts and work with our hands. We have a strong sense of place; we know who we are in a world that has lost its way. We have shared

    The global economy is changing, jobs are chang-ing, and life is changing at a rapid pace. This years top 10 companies didnt exist 10 years ago and the flip side of the coin is that many jobs that were pop-ular 10 years ago are now non existent. There will be job roles like the little

    Island Fishermen Keep Up the Fight for Their Rights Continued from Front page

    Page 5 An Carraig

    vince the various departments to o v e r t u r n t h e goverments deci-sion. The impact of the banning of salmon fishing cannot be under-estimated and the group continue the fight which has lasted close on seven years. The group have made two separa te presentations to the Joint Oireach-tas Committee and a re cu r ren t l y

    values which are based on principles handed down for generations. We are a place apart; I believe it is because we are on the edge, of Ire-land, Europe and the world, allowing for more diversity and ingenuity.

    THINK GLOBAL, ACT LOCAL

    awaiting the draft report. The Fishermen con-tinue to be cautious-ly optimistic that a satisfactory conclu-sion will come out of the many years of hard work carried out by a few dedi-cated men. The is-sue of the ban on 'Area 6a' which ef-fectively saw all the island boats having to target only two species - crab and lobster - has been

    relaxed. This relax-ation of the rules has come about because of the per-sistence of the Is-lands committee, which has seen the group meet with MEPs from many countries. The group met with the European commis-sioner and again through hard work and count less hours of lobbying a very satisfactory amendment and commitment to

    sustain island life was introduced, which in the long term will have huge benefits to the Island. We hope to report on the Oireachtas Com-mittee on the next is-sue of the newsletter. Jerry Early Spokes-person.

  • The local currency

    project on Arranmore

    was closed on the

    28th September 2013

    and the local busi-

    nesses cashed in their

    Ogham Bonds for Eu-

    ros. The summer

    experiment was to

    examine if there is a

    willingness, support

    and need for a local

    currency on the is-

    land. The plan was

    that this initiative

    would deepen the un-

    derstanding of econo-

    my for communities

    through education.

    The project develop-

    er, Dr Shirley Gal-

    lagher told an Car-

    raig that the project

    was a triumph in

    many ways. It

    showed the ability of

    the islanders to trust

    me, the project as

    well as each other.

    When speaking to

    Jerry Early, a local

    publican on the topic

    he exclaimed of

    course we would sup-

    port it, sure you are

    one of our own. The

    quirky nature of the

    project allowed peo-

    ple to think outside

    the box and explore

    unchartered territo-

    ries. By empowering

    the community and

    having open and

    frank conversations, it

    raised awareness of

    the current situation

    following the financial

    crash of 2008 and the

    ongoing recession.

    So to summarise, the

    Ogham Bonds created

    and work on the is-land. We have a stunning environment to live in but also to harness energy from, ensuring we are no longer reliant on im-ported fuel. We are working towards this future with the help of SMILEGOV. We have a strong social capital, connections and a trust that is there due to shared values. gotop7

    It has been decided that Arran wants a future, not the one that was predict-ed, a resort but one with a vibrant community and a smart economy.

    We have an educated workforce, many multi lingual, all English speak-ing. We have skilled, knowledgeable, creative people. Many are scat-tered throughout the globe but would return if there was a place to live

    Our industries, the tourist, fishing and farming sectors are in need of help, we need to enable them to build an infrastructure in order to create higher value stock and produce. We need a modern communication link with the rest of the world. We need jobs both highly skilled and manual in order to ensure the island has a future.

    CREATING FUTURE JOB OPPORTUNITIES

    Ogham Bond Our Island Currency

    Page 6 An Carraig

    a talking point

    which raised

    awareness, pro-

    vided free adver-

    tisement for the

    island and em-

    powered the

    community to

    think what else

    can we do?

  • around the table. By invest-ing in the green economy, we can build something to-gether faster and further together.

    My vision, which sits in the community centre, has a place we can live, work and play together. It is a sus-tainable future that is possi-ble today. It shows a sense of security in growing our own food, creating energy,

    An Intelligent Energy Europe funded initiative called SMI-LEGOV, is bringing together a raft of islands it is proposed that we as islands work to-gether to create a model that can be replicated in other rural coastal regions. As we have the potential to produce renewable energy using wind, wave, tidal and solar. The project is bringing to-gether islanders, government agencies, trainers and inves-tors bringing everyone

    using it wisely, creating jobs and a place to have fun.

    My objective as part of the SMILEGOV project is for the island to become an innova-tion hub, using our connec-tions, and using the energy generated on the island to create employment. I am proposing that we examine using the energy to grow food for home use and for market and processing local

    VISION AND OBJECTIVES OF THE SMILEGOV PROJECT

    ISLAND COUNCIL

    CREATING FUTURE JOB OPPORTUNITIES continued from Page 6

    Page 7 An Carraig

    a place

    we can

    live,

    work and

    play

    together The pie chart identifies that most of the Ogham Bonds were used in 4 places on the island. Many thanks to all who partici-pated including the businesses above but not forgetting custom-ers such as Patrick Poolawaddy, Wee Sheila Gallagher, John (a Bhad) OHara and Bridget Mc Gowan.

    We have of the require-ments; we are looking for suggestions on what could be done with existing sec-tors but plan to create new sectors for the future of Arran.

    GET IN CONTACT AND WATCH THIS SPACE

    John Walsh from Bere Is-land will visit on Saturday 26th January 2014 at Ionad an Chrois Bhealaigh to dis-cuss and share his experi-ences on creating and run-ning an island council. It is hoped that this will lead to open and frank discussion on the topic, of creating an island council.

    It is proposed that the is-

    land council will be based on Muntir na Tire council concept (www.muintir.ie). This move-ment that was set up in 1937, it was designed to raise the standard of living of rural Ire-land in social, economic, cultur-al and recreational based on participation of people them-selves to promote the welfare of their own community.

    Objectives of Council

    To unite Irish communities in a

    spirit of community service, neighbourliness and self reliance in working for the common good.

    To promote the welfare of the Irish people through an organisation that is non party political and non sectional.

    To foster a sense of responsibility to the needs and problems of the local community and to de-vise programmes of action and development particularly those based on co-operation.

    produce, marketing and brand-ing as one. This will create a vibrant community that will be a beacon for those wanting to live in a safe and caring environ-ment. I want to nurture the care, craft and culture of our island. I want to work together for a shared and lasting prosper-ity for Arranmore.

  • The definition of what is a sustainable community has been taken from SEAI Guidelines for a Sustaina-ble Community and related back to the island by Shirley Gallagher. This is available from their site www.seai.ie but also on the facebook group sustainable is-lands, under files as is other important documentation.

    It should be a sustainable energy zone-a specific geo-graphical area. As Arran is an island, our geographical boundary is obvious. This should allow others to become aware of the idea and allow us to become a test site for inno-vative products.

    An example is the KickTrike. This is still in testing phase; however we are currently in talks to produce the product on Arran and also to use them. We are hoping it will be a dis-r u p t i v e i n n o v a t i o n i s an innovation that disrupts, im-proves and replaces an existing product over time in unex-pected ways. The KickTrike will be demonstrated at the up-coming event in Howth Yacht Club Ammunition for Success where Dr Shirley Gallagher and Mr Axel Pohle, colleagues at Irish Radio International (www.irishradiointernational.com) will discuss how Arran is leading the flock in sustainable

    communities on the 9th Jan-uary 2014. A demonstra-tion on the island, including a visit to the braes, School, Glen, Jimmy Wards and Barr an Baile Mor will be hosted by SysPro;Systems for Progress Limited on the 10th January 2014.

    It should cover all as-pects of society, resi-dential, educational, commercial and public. Stakeholders are from all sectors, private and public.

    Many members of Ar-ranmore society have re-ceived notification of the SMILEGOV initiative, many have returned their letters of support and others are encouraged to engage, question and support initia-tive. Using face to face meetings as well as the use of social media has been critical. It is believed that the diaspora are part of the solution, where many would chose to return home if work was available. As a result they have been in-cluded in the consultation.

    It should have strong stakeholder community commitment. Ensure momentum is main-tained and improved.

    Working on the council idea came about from Shirleys

    visit to Scandinavia and discussion of their best practises. Bere Island, Co Cork created their council in 2004. John Walsh, C h a i r m a n o f Comhdhaill will visit Arranmore on Satur-day 25th January 2014 to share his experi-ence on Bere and on the creation of the West Cork Islands ini-tiative. We would en-courage everyone to attend the meeting that is interested in creating a united and fairer society in Ar-ranmore.

    It must have a de-fined management structure and pro-cess.

    This is where the need for a council of island representatives is critical. It is per-ceived that we will have a representative for every 20 persons. It has been proposed that the townlands and business sectors should be represent-ed as well as the edu-cational and health establishments.

    A baseline energy study must be fully understood

    We are completely

    What is a Sustainable Community?

    Page 8 An Carraig

  • dependent on fossil fuel at present and as cost rises we need to think smarter in how we manage these costs. The feasibility report will include a baseline energy study to ensure we know where we started from in terms of energy. We need to create and a im fo r SMART (specific, measurable, accurate, realistic and timely) targets that are integrated into our so-ciety with energy effi-cient projects and a sustainable energy supply.

    It must be replica-ble and a good prac-tise study

    This is to allow others to follow our example and benefit from our

    that all islanders will support this initiative on the 28th by agree-ing to the pact of is-lands by writing a draft letter of sup-port. Over 130 let-ters already have been gratefully re-ceived. This will com-plete our part of the SMILEGOV initiative and we will examine

    In the upcoming meeting on the 28th December 2013 at Ionad an Chrois Bhealaigh the focus will be on issues re-lating to SMILEGOV the establishment act and the pact of islands. These have been taken from an international meet-ings and it is hoped

    the next phase of de-veloping Arainn into a thriving sustainable community.

    UPCOMING MEETING 28th December 8pm

    at Ionad an Chrois Bhealaigh

    What is a Sustainable Community? continued from Page 6

    Page 9 An Carraig

    knowledge and learning experiences. This will provide a flow of people to the island, eco tourists eager to learn how they can do the same. Other places such as Samso, Denmark, Orkneys, Scot-land and Gussing, Austria have found this to be the case but also it has led to an increase in population and job opportunities. The 8 inhabited West Cork islands and Inis Mor are also involved in SMI-LEGOV and are driving forward on their islands.

    It must provide clear recognisable benefits

    We believe that creating a focus on energy and its role in producing future jobs, will increase com-munity engagement, em-power islanders, increase population, improve

    health and increase tourism.

    Funding of the projects that develop will come from a number of sources.

    CHECK OUT group-SUSTAINABLE islands on facebook/Linkedin

    DEMO on 10th January on a brae near you

  • Tangible Ireland was estab-lished in 2001 to provide sup-port services to both indige-nous start up enterprises and foreign direct investment (FDI). From the beginning at Tangible we had a significant interest and commitment to corporate social responsibility (CSR) with particular focus on community empowerment, Social Enter-prise and Cross Community and Cross Border projects. Since the fiscal crisis on 2008, Tangibles CSR activities have further evolved into promoting thought leadership around the core values of collaborative leadership, shared excellence and the concept of pay it for-ward!

    Tangible is positive in its out-look and pragmatic in its ap-proach. We seek to add value through our interventions and to provide a beacon of leader-ship and inspiration for those with passion and talent in the battle for a positive future.

    In early 2009, we initiated the Tangible Leadership se-ries bringing together a di-verse collection of intellects and advocates to face the challenges of creating an improved Ireland. With a global network of over 1000 followers/contributors keen to participate in Tangible debate which is restriction free, positive and pragmat-ic, we visit venues from Bel-fast to Sydney, Ballyhoura to New York.

    2 0 1 4 , b e g i n s w i t h Ammunition for Suc-cess in Howth on January 9th at the Yacht Club. Our theme is based on cen-tenary of the Howth Gun Running in 1914, which was the precursor to the Easter Rising in 1916.

    It was through Linkedin that we heard of Shirley Gallaghers endeavours to bring a more sustainable

    Towards an Excellent Ireland, Ar Aghaidh Linn

    Page 10 An Carraig

    economy to Arainn Mhor. Her ideas about cultivat-ing indigenous enterprise, championing the fishing industry and creating a greater connectivity be-tween island communities around the world reso-nate well with our Tangi-ble values. We have highlighted her work re-cently in the London Irish Centre hosting the semi-nar London, Our friend in Europe in November 2013. We look forward to hearing from Shirley in Howth in January where many will empathise with her passion for positive intervention in coastal communities.

    Ar Aghaidh Linn!

    Raymond Sexton

    Tangible Ireland-your partner in a global economy

    [email protected]

    I only recognise

    the strangers,

    coming back home,

    as they came home,

    every sun segued, rain shaped summer,

    lugging suitcases and trunks off the ferry

    HOLYHEAD

    and better suits and dressed

    than the set of clothes and Sunday best

    theyd arrived in.

    Home to a place that didnt exist.

    Restless with the urge to run

    They hid at the kitchen table,

    On the street, in the pew, at the counter.

    They couldnt breathe

    For fresh air

    And found

    Longing where they least ex-pected it.

    Joseph Horgan

    Taken from

    An Unscheduled Life Agenda Editions 2012

  • islander is a sense of community, character, and sus-tainability-necessities for liv-ing in an isolated location. However, global challenges including climate change (higher ocean temperatures and acidification), loss of fisheries, high energy costs and the subsequent departure of youth are straining the viability of these communities.

    Despite these chal-lenges, many is-

    My family has called the islands of Casco Bay, Maine, 2 hours northeast of Boston and in particular Long Island home for hun-dreds of years. Long Islands population is 200 with many more in the summer months. My 3 chil-dren go to school there and my family have been lobster fishermen for genera-tions.

    Island communities around the globe share remarkably simi-lar principles, chal-lenges and opportuni-ties. Inherent in an

    Greetings from America Nathan Johnson, Ocean Renewable Power Company

    Clean Predictable Power from Oceans and Rivers

    Page 11 An Carraig

    lands are blessed with an untapped resource, energy from the ocean and the skilled mariners familiar with working this harsh environment. I have been involved in making energy projects happen as a Director of Ocean Renewable Pow-er Corporation (ORPC). In 2012, ORPC made history by connecting a tidal turbine to the elec-tric grid, near Eastport, Maine, a first for ocean energy in the Americas.

    Building on OPRCs early success, we are pursu-ing global opportunities to develop ocean ener-

    gy projects. Through recent conversations with Shirley Gallagher and a meeting with delegates from Done-gal County Council we are strengthening connections and learning about oppor-tunities in the area. I look forward to fur-ther communications both personally and professionally and en-courage you to con-tact me if you have further interest relat-ed to Maines island communities and ORPC.

  • An Carraig Page 12