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Workshop on Modelling and Simulation of Coal-fired Power Generation and CCS Process

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  • 1. Mathematical Modelling and Simulation of Power Plants and CO2Capture WORKSHOP 2012 A UK CCS Community Network Specialist Workshop supported byThe Research Councils UK Energy ProgrammeReport Coventry 04/2012

2. Contents1.Summary .........................................................................................................................................................32.WORKSHOP PROGRAMME .............................................................................................................................43.ABSTRACTS .....................................................................................................................................................5 1st Day, 20th March 2012.....................................................................................................................................5 2nd Day, 21st March 2012 ....................................................................................................................................84.List of attendees .......................................................................................................................................... 145.Total costs .................................................................................................................................................... 16 3. 1. SummaryOn 20th/21st March, the international workshop on Mathematical Modelling and Simulation of Power Plantsand CO2 Capture Processes was held at Warwick, which is organised by Prof Jihong Wang and Dr Jacek Wojcikwith the support of the researchers from Power and Control Systems Research Laboratory.Mathematical modelling and simulation play a crucial role in proof of concept, feasibility study, reliability andperformance analysis for new design and development to be cost effective and robust. This is especiallyimportant in power generation industry and deployment of CO2 capture technologies, where we are limitedin experiments with the real object (power plant). Modelling can potentially support decisions at a range ofbusiness levels, from strategic planning, component and process design through to plant and systemimplementation, operation and maintenance. The workshop included 16 presentations from academicinstitutions and industry. 60 participants from UK, China, Poland, Belgium and USA were willingness to sharetheir time and expertise in the area of mathematical modelling and simulation.The main aims of this workshop were:to exchange the information of modelling and simulation techniques and the progress of research in this area;to create a meeting platform for researchers in this area to get together;to get a better picture for who does what in this research area;to update the software package and computer language available for modelling and simulation;to explore the opportunity for more unified software package in the future to achieve exchangeable modelling and simulation blocks;to get better ideas for what the industrial needs are.It was also a great opportunity to make new contacts and to discus for potential collaboration and futuregrant applications. The event is sponsored by UKCCSC (UK Carbon Capture and Storage Community), ScienceCity Energy Efficiency Project and Warwick GPP in energy.Organisers:Prof J Wang, Dr J D Wojcik (The University of Warwick), Dr H Chalmers and Dr M Lucquiaud (The University of Edinburgh), Dr J Peng (The University of Sussex)Date:12:00 lunch time 20th March 2012 14:00 21st March 2012 Dinner: Scarman House (on University Campus), 20th March 2012Venue: F111, School of Engineering, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL, United KingdomProgramme: The workshop programme consists of presentations and software demonstrations. 4. 2. WORKSHOP PROGRAMME 1st day, 20th March 2012 TimeVenueFirst floor next12:00 Registration and lunchto F10613:30 Welcoming address remarks F111 Presentations from academic institutions and industry13:50Prof Q Gao Tsinghua UniversityClean Coal Technology in ChinaF11114:20 Prof M Pourkashanian (TBC)University of Leedstbc F111Hybrid Coal-fired Power Plants with CO2 Capture: An Economic14:40 Dr M H Wang Cranfield University F111 Evaluation and Dynamic Analysis15:00Anthony Browne ( Dr Hao Liu) University of NottinghamModeling of Post Combustion Carbon Capture in Aspen HYSYSF11115:20-First floor next15:40Coffee break to F10615:40Greg Kosowski TRAX InternationalCarbon Capture Modeling using ProTRAX F11116:00 Joakim Beck (Prof Eric Fraga)University College LondonSurrogate modelling for PSA design for carbon captureF111 Addressing technology uncertainties in power plants with post-16:20Dr Mathieu Lucquiaud University of EdinburghF111 combustion capture: The need for bespoke CCS power plant modelsProf J Wang , Prof Q Gao, University of Warwick and Supercritical Coal Fired Power Plant Dynamic Responses and Control16:40Dr Y L Xue, Dr J Wojcik, Dr B Al- F111Tsinghua University for Grid Code ComplianceDuri , M Draganescu, S Guo F106/17:20 Demonstration of ProTRAX software package Coffee Break and Networking, tour Engineering at Warwick F111/A20518:30 Workshop DinnerScarman House2nd day, 21st March 2012 TimeVenue8:30- First floor next9:00 tea/coffee/cakes to F106 Presentations from academic institutions and industry09:00Dr Zhichun Sun Shenhua Guohua PowerStudy on the Mechanism of Being Blocked of GGH in Power Plants F111 PSE Ltd and Cranfield09:20 Dr Adekola LawalDynamic analysis of coal-fired subcritical power plant with CO2 captureF111University The effects of parameters of primary frequency control on the09:40Dr Z X Sun Xian Jiaotong UniversityF111stabilization of grid frequency Development and validation of dynamic models for CO2 capture with10:00Chet Biliyok Cranfield University F111 chemical AbsorptionNiall Mac Dowell (Prof Shah,10:20 Imperial CollegeDynamic modelling of amine-based CO2 capture processes F111 Nilay)10:40-First floor next11:00Coffee Break to F106The practical use of selected models of power plant objects in various11:00 M LipinskiIASE F111control systems of pulverized coal-fired drum boilers.11:20 Daniel FriedrichUniversity of Edinburgh Efficient simulations of general adsorption cycles F111 Dr J Wood, Prof J Wang, Y University of Birmingham Modelling of Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Plant11:40F111Wang, S Caldwell and University of WarwickCycle at IGCC Power StationsFirst floor next12:20 Lunch to F106 Small meetings for further discussions 13:00after the main workshop 5. 3. ABSTRACTS 1st Day, 20th March 2012Hybrid Coal-fired Power Plants with CO2 Capture: An Economic Evaluation andDynamic AnalysisMeihong Wanga, Ye Huangb and Adekola Lawala,caProcess Systems Engineering Group, School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Bedfordshire,MK43 0AL, UK.bCentre for Sustainable Technologies, School of the Built Environment, University of Ulster, UK, BT37 0QBc Process Systems Enterprise Ltd, 26-28 Hammersmith Grove, London W6 7HA, UKPost-combustion capture by chemical absorption using monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent is well suited fortreating flue gas streams with low CO2 partial pressures typical of coal-fired power plants. The drawback ofthis process is the high energy requirement for solvent regeneration. However, it requires minimalmodifications to the combustion process and is thus well suited for retrofit options.The oxyfuel process produces a flue gas stream that has a high CO2 partial pressure which makes CO2separation considerably easier. However, the Air Separation Unit (ASU) would require large quantities ofenergy to generate the amounts of oxygen needed for the conventional oxyfuel process. In addition,significant modifications to the boiler are required when firing pulverized fuel in a concentrated oxygenstream instead of air.Doukelis et al. (2009) show that there could be benefits in a combination of these two types of CO 2 capturetechnologies, resulting in a partial oxyfuel mode in the furnace and the post-combustion solvent scrubbing.They suggested that this option may be particularly beneficial when retrofitting existing power plants.This study investigates (a) the economic evaluation as presented in Huang et al. (2012); (b) the operation ofthe chemical absorption process downstream an enhanced-O2 coal power plant using dynamic modelling andsimulation as presented in Lawal et al. (2011).Keywords: Post-combustion, CO2 capture, Pulverized coal power plant, oxy-fuel combustion, Chemicalabsorption, MEA, Dynamic modellingModelling of Post Combustion Carbon Capture in Aspen HYSYSAnthony BrowneUniversity of NottinghamThis presentation describes the process for, and initial outcomes of modelling a Post Combustion CarbonCapture (PCC) system within Aspen HYSYS V7.1 where both technical and economic estimations arenecessary. The work has highlighted a number of key knowledge areas to be developed in order for improvedtechnical modelling and cost estimation. Notably a better understanding of how Aspen HYSYS utilises thechemical models within its Amines Property Package, and the replacement of generic costs for steam andprocess water.A system treating 5% of the flue gas stream from a 500MW coal fired power station, utilising aqueous MEA isdescribed. The model estimates costs of 0.15 per Kg of CO2 captured with total fixed costs of 23million withannual operating costs of 25million. This represents an additional cost of 0.12 per KWH of electricitygenerated. 6. Carbon Capture Modeling using ProTRAXGreg KosowskiTRAX InternationalCapturing the carbon dioxide emitted from fossil-fired power plants will be necessary if targeted reductions incarbon emissions are to be achieved. One method of burning coal in utility boilers that simplifies the carboncapture process is called oxy-combustion. During the oxy-combustion process, coal is burned in oxygeninstead of air; this results in a flue gas stream consisting almost entirely of water vapor and carbon dioxide.Standard industrial equipment can then be used

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