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Focusing on Instructional Strategies Using Thinking Maps for Curriculum Planning Chapter 5 Pages 234 - 240

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Glenn Hills Middle School participated in a Thinking Maps Training Session on May 27, 2010. Please view the slide show to see what we learned!

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  • 1.
  • 2. Focusing on Instructional Strategies
    Using Thinking Maps for Curriculum Planning
    Chapter 5
    Pages 234 - 240
  • 3. GREAT TEACHING REQUIRES PLANNING
    Page 235
    BEGIN WITH THE END IN MIND
    -Covey
  • 4. Step One: Brainstorming and Defining
    Page 236
  • 5. Step One: Brainstorming and Defining
    Page 237
  • 6. Step Two: Classify and Task Analyze the Learnings
    Page 238
  • 7. Step Two: Classify and Task Analyze the Learnings
    Page 238
  • 8. Page 239
    UNIT PLANNING
    Step Two: Classify and Task Analyze the Learnings
  • 9.
  • 10. Page 142
  • 11. Grade Level or Content Area Standards
    Use the labels to match your standards with the maps that could be used to teach the standard.
    If more than one map is needed, write the name of the map below the standard label.
    MAKING THE CONNECTION
    Create a Tree Map (landscape) with a category for all 8 Thinking Maps.
    and Flow
  • 12. Create a list of key words for each Thinking Map category.
    Grade Level or Content Area Standards
    Key Words
    Key Words
    Key Words
    Key Words
    Key Words
    KeyWords
    Key Words
    Impact
    Effect
    Cause
    changes
    Key Words
    MAKING THE CONNECTION
    Use a highlighter to mark the key word (academic language) for each standard.
    Key Words page 77
  • 13. DECONSTRUCTING A STANDARD
    As a team, choose one of the standards on your Tree Map and deconstruct it.
    Try to think of all of the maps you might need to teach that standard. Use the suggestions identified in Chapter 4 to help you connect the Thinking Maps to your content.
    If time permits, put the actual content in the maps.
    Draw the maps on the same sheet with the standards.
  • 14. DECONSTRUCTING A STANDARD
    Compares and contrast the motives of characters in a work of fiction.
  • 15. DECONSTRUCTING A STANDARD
    Students know how to differentiate among igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks by referring to their properties and methods of formation (the rock cycle).
  • 16.
  • 17.
  • 18.
  • 19.
  • 20. Prior Knowledge
    How do you know what you know?
    (Be Specific)
    Not just TV, but which shows.
  • 21.
  • 22. Now add a Frame of Reference to your Circle Map. Where did you get your information? What was influencing your definition? Write the names of anyone you thought about as you developed your definition.
  • 23. Source(s)
    Where did you get your information?
    What is the best source for information about this subject?
  • 24. Now lets add a Source beyond your Prior Knowledge.
    Read the following article.
    Craig Wilsons Real heroes: We could all learn something from them.
    USA Today, November 2003
  • 25. 1
    2
    3
    COOPERATIVE LEARNING STRATEGY
    Count off at your tables
    1 3.
    Write your number on your paper.
  • 26. Page 73
  • 27. Add a Frame of Reference and identify the source of any adjective that you inferred. Your source should be textual support.
  • 28. Raise your hand, holding up either one, two, or three fingers based on your assignment.
    Locate someone else with the same number and pair with that person.
    Exchange maps and discuss your ideas with each other. Borrow ideas from each other and add them to your own map.
    MAP, MOVE, MAP
    Hold the map you have created in your hand and stand up.
    This cooperative learning activity can be found on page 260.
  • 29. Page 73
  • 30. Raise your hand, holding up either one, two, or three fingers based on your assignment.
    Locate someone with a different number and pair with that person.
    The two of you should sit somewhere and create a Double Bubble Map comparing your two heroes.
    MAP, MOVE, MAP
    Hold the map you have created in your hand and stand up.
    This cooperative learning activity can be found on page 260.
  • 31. 1s
    2s
  • 32. Now return to your original table and discuss your Double Bubble Maps. Focus on the similarities. Add a Frame of Reference and answer the question What conclusions can you draw from the map you made and the others discussed at your table?
  • 33. Finally, as a team create a Circle Map to define what a hero is. Base your definition on this essay and your maps.
    Your maps
  • 34. Page 73
  • 35. I Think
    I Think
    I Think
    I Think
    Look at the title of the article. What do you think Craig Wilson wants us to learn from these heroes?
    Your maps
  • 36. I Think
    I Think
    I Think
    I Think
    Look at the title of the article. What do you think Craig Wilson wants us to learn from these heroes?
  • 37. AUTHORS PURPOSE
    WHAT IS THE BIG IDEA?