The Northern View, June 26, 2013

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June 26, 2013 edition of the The Northern View

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<ul><li><p>250.624.9298Suite 6 - 342 3rd Ave W. info@gordonkobza.com</p><p>Your home is one of the biggest investments you will ever make. As a licensed realtor with over 23 years of experience, whether you are selling or buying, I am here to guide you through every phase of the process with skill and integrity. For a free consultation please call or e-mail me today. I look forward to helping you nd the perfect home!1905 Graham</p><p>$325,0002316 Graham$695,000 www.gordonkobza.com</p><p>Gord KobzaThe Power of ExperienceSOL</p><p>D SOLD</p><p>VOL. 8 NO. 27 Wednesday, June 26, 2013 FREE</p><p>PRINCE RUPERT</p><p>Saluting the Class of 2013.</p><p>Page C1-C8</p><p>Feature</p><p>Port authority looks to a bright future.</p><p>Page A7</p><p>Business</p><p>Husband and wife take seniors titles.</p><p>Page A11</p><p>Sports</p><p>National Aboriginal Day on Haida Gwaii.</p><p>Page B1</p><p>Haida Gwaii</p><p>PRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERTPRINCE RUPERT</p><p>Martina Perry / The Northern ViewSm Halyaat dancer Sam Bryant performs the Eagle Down Dance at Prince Ruperts National Aboriginal Day celebration on Friday. For more on the day, see Page A9.</p><p>EAGLE DOWN </p><p>Exxon files for LNG licence</p><p>BY CAMERON ORR / SHAUN THOMAS PRINCE RUPERT / Black Press</p><p>The largest energy company in the world is seeking to make its mark on the North Coast. </p><p>Imperial Oil Canada and ExxonMobil Canada have filed an application with the National Energy Board for a permit to export liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the region. The jointly-owned entity, named WCC LNG which stands for West Coast Canada is seeking to construct a terminal either in Kitimat or in Prince Rupert.</p><p>Basically that is an application for permission to potentially export up to 30 million tonnes a year of liquefied natural gas for a period of 25 years, Imperial Oil spokesperson Pius Rolheiser, said.</p><p>Imperial Oil, Exxon Mobil looking to Rupert, Kitimat</p><p>Were probably years away from a final investment </p><p>decision.</p><p>- Pius Rolheiser</p><p>See EXXON on Page A2</p><p>Drug paraphernalia probe targets second storeRCMP tell Express News to take pipes, bongs off shelves</p><p>BY MARTINA PERRY PRINCE RUPERT / The Northern View</p><p>Shortly after seizing thousands of pipes, bongs and grinders from The Chad Smoke Shop, another Prince Rupert business has been warned they could face punishment for selling similar products.</p><p>Krish, the manager of Prince Ruperts Express News who asked his last name not be used, confirmed RCMP came into Express News in the Rupert Square Mall on June 17 to inform staff it is illegal to sell pipes and bongs in the country.</p><p>Its unfortunate we cant sell it, but we dont want to break any laws or get into any kind of trouble, Krish said.</p><p>Shelving at Express News that was once filled with glass pipes and bongs now sit empty, with Krish saying he is unaware if other products will ever fill up the shelves in the future. Under Section 462.2 of the Criminal Code of Canada, everyone who knowingly imports into Canada, </p><p>exports from Canada, manufactures, promotes or sells instruments of literature for illicit drug use is guilty of an offence.</p><p>If we do sell them, like at [The Chad Smoke Shop] they could be seized, and we could face an offence. Right now, our franchiser has asked us to take them off the shelves, he said.</p><p>Krish said its another blow to the business. When Express News opened its doors a year ago it planned on selling lottery tickets, but were unable to. Krish said now that Express New isnt allowed to sell these items, the stores inventory has been narrowed. Krish and his family moved from Vancouver, with his parents investing money to open the business. </p><p>Every other store in Canada is getting to sell these items. Its </p><p>unfair that we cant.</p><p>- Krish</p><p>See Express on Page A2</p></li><li><p>A2 Northern View June 26, 2013 www.thenorthernview.com</p><p>DISCOVERA WORLD OF OPPORTUNITY</p><p>AT THE PRINCE RUPERTPORT INTERPRETIVE CENTRE</p><p>LOCATED ON PRINCE RUPERTSSCENIC CENTRAL WATERFRONT</p><p>OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK9:00 AM5:30 PM</p><p>FREE ADMISSION CHILDREN ARE WELCOME</p><p>CALL 250 624-4559 FOR INFORMATIONWWW.RUPERTPORT.COM/CENTRE</p><p>News</p><p>Port AuthorityFace of Safety</p><p>But he emphasized that filing for this permit does not mean the companies will be going ahead with any construction or even making a decision on actually building anything in the years to come.</p><p>It will help us in our continuing engagement with First Nations, regulators, potential customers and pipeline companies, he said. </p><p>Were probably years away from a final investment decision.</p><p>He said so far the company is looking at sites both in Prince Rupert and Kitimat and has not yet made a decision on location. Investigative permits were received for both communities last year.</p><p>At the same time as ExxonMobil, BG Group Canada applied for an export licence for up to 21.6 million tonnes per year from its planned terminal on Ridley Island. </p><p>Just two days later, the public comment period for its environmental assessment began. To view the draft EIS Guidelines, visit the Agencys website at www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca </p><p>With the restrictions Prince Ruperts Express News has come across, the family is fearful they will not get their investment back.</p><p>Every other store in Canada is getting to sell these items. Its unfair that we cant, Krish said.</p><p>No other Express News store in British Columbia is being warned about selling the smoking devices.</p><p>Were a tobacco store that sold them for tobacco use only ... our intention was for the items to be used for tobacco, Krish said.</p><p>The warning comes after Prince Rupert RCMP executed a search warrant on The Chad Smoke Shop earlier this month after a six-month investigation into the business, which has now closed its doors. RCMP said Chad Wentworth, the owner of four other smoke shops in B.C., could be facing criminal charges.</p><p>Dana Larsen of Sensible BC, a group working toward decriminalizing possession of marijuana and stopping police from spending time or resources on possession cases, said he believes there are more pressing issues Prince Rupert RCMP could be investigating.</p><p>This kind of selective enforcement is really not where the RCMP should be focusing their resources. Policing costs are skyrocketing in B.C ... yet they were able to do a six-month investigation into this store selling bongs and pipes. I think the people of Prince Rupert would rather see their RCMP force spending that amount of investigative time and effort on going after real crimes, he said.</p><p>Larsen said its not only unfair RCMP assumed items sold at Express News would be used for marijuana, but its also unfair for individuals purchasing items to smoke medical marijuana.</p><p>I would encourage them to stand up </p><p>to the RCMP on this ... I would love to see this case go to court because I believe this law could be struck down once and for all, he said.</p><p>Not all Prince Rupert businesses known for selling pipes, bongs or grinders were given a warning. When contacted on the morning of June 19, Doug Larsen, manager at Prince Ruperts pawn shop Homesteader New and Used confirmed the business had not been contacted by RCMP regarding the sale of pipes, bongs and grinders. Larsen declined to comment further.</p><p>Repeated requests for comment from the Prince Rupert RCMP were not returned.</p><p>BG Group files for permit</p><p>EXXON from Page A1</p><p>Sensible BC leader pushing for court challenge</p><p>EXPRESS from Page A1</p><p>Martina Perry / The Northern ViewShelving that once housed pipes and bongs at Express News in the Rupert Square Mall sit empty after RCMP warned the owners of possible criminal charges.</p><p>Businesses urged to stand up to RCMP</p><p>THIS IS WHAT SAFETY LOOKS LIKEAT THE PORT OF PRINCE RUPERT.</p><p>At the Port of Prince Rupert, a commitment to safe shipping is part of who we are. Local experts and organizations work together every day to apply industry-leading practices in vessel handling and harbour safety. Dave Fisher and his security team at the Prince Rupert Port Authority are part of the picture. Get the facts today at www.rupertport.com/safety.</p><p>Print layouts corrected size.indd 6 6/24/2013 9:41:48 AM</p></li><li><p>208 1st Ave East, Prince Rupert 250-624-9498 1-800-808-3988</p><p>www.hseds.ca</p><p>TRAINING CENTREJuly (Price includes GST)Scaffolding (June 28&amp;29 Fri&amp;Sat) 9-5 ............................... $236.25</p><p>July (Price includes GST)Kitchen Helper (July 8-10 Mon-Wed) 9-3 ............................ $199.50WHMIS Online (July 11 Thurs) ...................................... $43.00Food Safe (July 12 Fri) 8:30 - 6:00 ................................... $115.00 Front Of ce Worker Practical(July 25&amp;26 Thurs&amp;Fri) 9-4 ............................................ $153.72</p><p>EXTENDED SECURITY PROGRAM ($893.85 FOR ALL COURSESE OR SEPARATE AS LISTED BELOW)</p><p>Basic Security - July 10-20 (Wed-Fri-5-10 pm &amp; Sat-8-2 pm) 40 HoursExam: July 27 (Sat) 9-11 pm $582.10</p><p>Fire Safety Online - $30.00CSTS Online - $78.75</p><p>OFA1 - June 24 (Mon) 8:30 5:30 pm $115.00WHMIS Online - $43.00</p><p>TDG Online - $45.00</p><p>363-500 2nd Ave WestUpper level of the Rupert Square Shopping Centre</p><p>250-627-7551www.royallepage.ca/princerupert</p><p>Prince Rupert</p><p>Nadia Movold250-600-2334</p><p>Keith Lambourne250-622-8546</p><p>Heather Bullock250-627-9416</p><p>Emily Kawaguchi250-600-7343</p><p>Dorothy Wharton250-622-7653</p><p>Victor Prystay250-624-1202</p><p> $99,900</p><p>316 5th Ave W</p><p>Listed by Nadia</p><p> $209,499</p><p>913 8th Ave E</p><p>$189,000</p><p>160 Raven Cr</p><p>Listed by Dorothy</p><p>Listed by Dorothy &amp; Nadia</p><p>REDUCED</p><p>$179,900 </p><p>$239,900 </p><p>505 Herman St</p><p>533 11th Ave E</p><p>Listed by Heather</p><p>Listed by Dorothy</p><p>NEW LISTING</p><p>$339,000 Listed by Keith &amp; Nadia</p><p>125 Cade Pl</p><p>Prince Rupert</p><p>NEW LISTING NEW LI</p><p>STING</p><p>June 26, 2013 Northern View A3www.thenorthernview.com News</p><p>By Shaun ThomaS PRINCE RUPERT / The Northern View</p><p>The vacancy rate in Prince Rupert apartments dropped almost 10 per cent year-over-year, the sharpest decline experienced in the province. </p><p>Numbers from the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation show the vacancy rate for apartments fell from 13.5 per cent last April to just 3.9 per cent this April, a drop of 9.6 per cent. </p><p>The largest drop was in the availability of two bedroom apartments, which sits at 3.7 per cent compared to 16.7 per cent last April. The vacancy rate for bachelor apartments dropped from 13.1 per cent to 3.3 per cent, the vacancy rate for one bedroom apartments fell from 12.6 per cent to 4.9 per cent and the three bedroom vacancy rate sits at 1.4 per cent compared to 4.6 per cent last April. </p><p>The drop in vacancy came despite an increase in the number of apartment units on the market in Prince Rupert, rising from a total of 593 last year to 749 this year, an increase of 156.</p><p>Prince Ruperts apartment vacancy rate is just below that of Terrace, which is at 4.1 per cent, and just above the provincial average of 3.5 per cent. </p><p>Going along with the drop in vacancy is an increase in the average rent, which rose from $624 last year to $662 this year. </p><p>The average rent of a one bedroom apartment now sits at $621 compared to $582 and average rent for a two bedroom apartment rose from $691 to $745. While those two rents increased, the average rent for a three bedroom apartment fell from $630 to $617. </p><p>When townhouses are taken into consideration, the vacancy rate in the city fell from 12 per cent to 3.6 per cent. </p><p>Last year Prince Rupert had the highest vacancy rate in B.C. for communities in excess of 10,000 people. This year that dubious distinction went to Campbell River at 9.1 per cent. </p><p>Margaret Speirs / Terrace StandardFrom left, elder Joseph Brooks, Jill MacNeill and Ronnette Musterer protest outside the Best Western in Terrace on June 16 ahead of the Enbridge Northern Gateway Joint Review Panel final hearings.</p><p>No to eNbridge</p><p>There are fewer available rentals in Prince Rupert compared to 2012. </p><p>No longer the highest in B.C.</p><p>Rupert vacancy rate plummets</p></li><li><p>Back in 2007, as Fairview Terminal was about to open, the hype surrounding Prince Ruperts future was palpable. People from across the country were turning </p><p>their eyes to Kaien Island, although I wonder how many people knew Prince Rupert is actually on an island, as visions of unprecedented economic growth danced through their heads. The National Post, at the time, ran a section with a front page </p><p>proclaiming Prince Rupert Canadas next boom town. Money was flowing into town as new businesses opened their doors and investors were scooping up houses by the boatload in hopes of flipping them for a profit when the citys fortunes took off. </p><p>Fast forward almost six years and, by and large, Prince Rupert is not that different </p><p>than it was prior to the opening of Fairview Terminal. New businesses have opened while others have closed, there are more high-paying jobs but unemployment remains high and the population in the last census was down from 2006. </p><p>If anyone was expecting sudden economic growth or thought buying a house in 2007 would net hundreds of thousands of dollars in profit within five years, they were sorely mistaken The reality is this: That type of growth is not something that is going to shoot up overnight, particularly when dealing with an unproven commodity, which Fairview was at the time. </p><p>Although now, Prince Rupert is anything but an unproven commodity on the international shipping scene. In just five years, Fairview Terminal has gone from zero tonnes to smashing past its initial design capacity of 500,000 TEUs. thanks to speedy, efficient and reliable service that other container ports on the west coast are struggling to achieve. And Fairviews success has bred confidence in Prince Rupert as a gateway for other goods, be it the expansion of coal, the development of wood pellet exports, the idea of potash, the interest in LNG and so on. </p><p> On Wednesday, Don Krusel spoke about 90 million tonnes of goods moving through Prince Rupert by 2020. Having proven itself as a viable gateway to Asia, the boom is coming. </p><p>Much like Charles Hays vision for the city, talk of a boomtown in Prince Rupert back in 2007 was just ahead of its time. </p><p>737 Fraser Street Prince Rupert, B.C Ph: 250-624-8088 Fax: 250-624-8085 advertising@thenorthernview.com www.thenorthernview.com @northernview facebook.com/thenorthernview</p><p>B.C. Press Council: The Northern View is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the provinces newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the media...</p></li></ul>