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PRECEPTING SUCCESSFUL RESIDENT RESEARCH PROJECTS SCOTT ALDRIDGE, PHARM.D., BCPS SAINT LUKE’S HOSPITAL OF KC

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  • PRECEPTINGSUCCESSFUL RESIDENT RESEARCH PROJECTSSCOTT ALDRIDGE, PHARM.D., BCPS

    SAINT LUKE’S HOSPITAL OF KC

  • DISCLOSURES

    none

  • OBJECTIVES

    • Describe the elements of a research timeline to keep resident projects at a pace that will ensure completion.

    • Describe a systematic approach to generating new research project ideas or residents and/or students.

  • ASHP ACCREDITATION STANDARDS

    REQUIRED COMPETENCY AREAS FOR PGY1 PROGRAMS

    • 2015 standard• Goal R2.2: Demonstrate ability to evaluate and investigate

    practice, review data, and assimilate scientific evidence to improve patient care and/or the medication use system.

    www.ashp.org/menu/Residency/ResidencyAccreditation

  • BENEFITS OF CONDUCTING RESEARCH

    • Learn project management

    • Work as a team

    • Advance patient care

    • Make a lasting mark

    • Contribute to medical literature

    • Promote pharmacy profession

    • Creative outlet

  • CHALLENGES OF CONDUCTING RESEARCH

    • Lack of experience

    • Unfamiliar environment

    • No contacts

    • Time

  • “The secret to getting ahead is getting started.”

    --Mark Twain

  • www.ashp.org/DocLibrary/MemberCenter/NPF/Resident-Research-Timeline.pdf

  • Start from the finish line

    Hit the ground running

    Include all deadlines

    Script the manuscript

    Keeping tabs

    TIMELINE DEVELOPMENT

  • LEARNING ASSESSMENT

    Which of the following may be useful to include in a research timeline?

    Deadlines for poster abstractsPeriodic evaluationsManuscript draft deadlinesAll of the above

  • Ideas and Project Selection

  • WANTS VS. NEEDS

    • Resident wants…• something interesting• to make an impact; have a lasting effect• to publish their work

    • Department needs…• to make fiscal impact• to justify new pharmacy services• to improve patient safety• to improve pharmacy operations

  • SOLICITING IDEAS

    Pharmacy staff

    Pharmacy management

    Current residents

    Physicians

    Informatics

    Hospital committees

  • TRIMMING THE LIST

    Defined purpose and objectivesFiscal impactReadinessDoable in available timeframeData easily retrievedPatient care/safety impactNovel ideaLinkage to dept/institution goalsPublishable

  • RESEARCH RANKING TOOL

    Score projects for each of the criteria: 0=No, 1=Somewhat or Maybe, 2=Yes or Likely

  • Learning Assessment

    Which of these is a criterion for an ideal residency project?

    Broad scope with multiple objectivesReady for study by January 1Data is easily retrievable from EMRFiscal impact is negligible

  • PROJECT DESIGN

    “He who fails to plan, plans to fail.”--Anonymous

  • REQUIRED ELEMENTS

    • Background and study rationale

    • Study objectives

    • Endpoints

    • Study design• Inclusion/exclusion criteria • Comparators• Data collection methods• Sample size estimates• Data analysis plan

    • References

  • ENLISTING HELP

    Key stakeholders

    Research expert

    Websites

    IRB representative

    Statistician

    Outsiders with experience

    IT/Reporting teams

    Publisher/Journal reviewer

    Students

  • Learning Assessment

    Which of these is a benefit of involving outside resources in projects?

    Better study designStudents are cheap laborMore efficient usage of timeA and C only

  • KEY POINTS

    • Residents need direction• How to get started

    • Stay on track

    • Avoid pitfalls

    • Preceptors need help• More eyes = Better projects

    • Research Committee

    • Publication is the goal

  • [email protected]

    Precepting Successful Resident Research ProjectsDisclosuresObjectivesASHP Accreditation Standards ��Required Competency Areas for PGY1 Programs�Benefits of conducting researchChallenges of conducting researchSlide Number 7Slide Number 8Slide Number 9Slide Number 10Slide Number 11Slide Number 12Wants vs. Needs�Slide Number 14Soliciting ideasTrimming the listResearch ranking toolSlide Number 18Project designRequired elementsEnlisting helpSlide Number 22Key PointsQuestions?