intuitive intersection design case study: broadway & 96th street

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  • 1

    Intuitive Intersection Design Case Study: Broadway & 96th Street

    Joshua Benson, AICP, NYC Department of Transportation

    NACTO Designing Cities Conference, San Francisco, October 24, 2014

  • 2

    Hallmarks of Intuitive Design?

  • Vision zero Mayoral Initiative: Eliminate all traffic fatalities

    in NYC by 2020

    270 traffic fatalities/year average last 3 years

    NYC has committed to focused enforcement,

    education, policy & street design changes

    Street Design Projects 70 intersection & corridor projects/year, 50 VZ

    Case Study: Broadway at 96th Street

    Leveraging Geometric & Signalization

    changes 3

    Street Improvement Projects in NYC

  • Broadway at W. 96th Street Intersection Design Case Study

  • 2007: Subway reconstruction begins

    2010: Subway reconstruction completed

    2014:

    January 10 & 19: Pedestrian fatalities

    January 30: DOT Presents proposal to

    Community Board 7

    March 25: Intersection project begins

    May 20: Intersection project completed

    6

    Project Timeline

  • 7

    Context

    Major subway station: 3 lines, express & local service

    Heavy bus to subway transfer point

    High density housing, retail corridors, high pedestrian activity

    Regional motor vehicle traffic accessing highway interchange two

    blocks away

    Multiyear capital project to overhaul subway station & reconfigure

    intersection (2007-2010)

  • 8

    Vast improvement for transit rider experience in station

  • 9

    Access on surface level became more challenging

  • 10

    Delays, multiple crossings

  • 11

    Fatalities Alexander Shear, Jan 10, 2014

    Samantha Lee, Jan 19, 2014

    Injuries (2008-2012)

    Zero severe injuries

    52 total injuries, 20 pedestrian

    Recent pedestrian fatalities

  • 12

    Site Conditions

    Su

    bw

    ay

  • 13

    Legal trip from NW corner to Subway

    may have initial delay of 47 seconds

    Trip may take as long

    as 1 minute 45 seconds

    Phase A:

    15 secs

    Phase B:

    28 secs

    Phase C:

    15 secs

    Phase D:

    32 secs

    Pedestrian must cross

    south first, then east-west

    Signal Timing Multiphase Signal Prioritizes Left Turn Movements

  • 14

    Observed Issues Rampant Crossing against signal

    Pedestrians crossing median to median without crosswalk or

    signal during perceived gaps

    Not strong indicators of intuitive intersection design

  • 15

    3. New mall to

    mall crosswalk

    1. Two left turns

    banned: SB Broadway to EB W96th and

    WB W96th St to SB Broadway

    2. Expanded

    pedestrian space on

    north mall

    Proposed Plan

    4. New flush

    median & lane

    designations for

    W. 96th St

    N 5. Simpler

    signal

    phasing

  • 16

    Proposed Signal Phasing

    Phase A:

    43 secs

    Legal trip from NW corner to Subway has zero initial delay

    Phase B:

    15 secs Phase C:

    32 secs

    58 seconds maximum trip time

    Pedestrian has route flexibility/control

  • 17

    Pedestrian Crossing Time (Seconds) Proposed

    32

    43 0 43

    32

    47

    32

    58 43 43

    +15

    +15 +43

    Increase

    Existing

    N

  • 18

    Before and After

  • 19

    Before and After

  • 20

    Before and After

  • 21

    Before and After

  • 22

    Before and After (W 95th St)

  • Web: nyc.gov/dot

    Email: jbenson@dot.nyc.gov

    Captures flow of actual usage

    Creates direct pedestrian routes

    Offers more choice/control for pedestrians

    Eliminates excess delay

    Emphasizes Turn restrictions

    Zero pedestrian injuries since

    implementation

    Thank

    You

    Intuitive Design at Broadway & 96th

  • Project Area

    Project

    Site

    24

  • 25

    Existing Conditions

    Pedestrians

    cross

    median to

    median

    when they

    think there is

    a gap

  • 1. Fewer pedestrian/vehicular conflicts

    2. Less confusion and more natural compliance with signals

    3. Significant pedestrian and modest vehicular travel time

    improvements

    Anticipated Benefits

    26