Fall-Winter 2008 Newsletter California Horticultural Therapy

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<ul><li><p>8/4/2019 Fall-Winter 2008 Newsletter California Horticultural Therapy</p><p> 1/6</p><p>American Horticultural Therapy Association</p><p>CALIFORNIA CHAPTER</p><p>NEWSLETTER</p><p>NEWSLETTERFormerly known as</p><p>People Plant ConnectionA publication of the</p><p>California Chapter, AHTAFall/Winter 2008</p><p>Volume 10, Issue 3</p><p>MARK YOUR CALENDERS</p><p>Board.I need help orinput with thisMark Your Calendarssection...ANYONE?March ?????</p><p>San Francisco FlowerShow</p><p>March ??????</p><p>Belmar Symposium</p><p>San Francisco BotanicalGardens</p><p>Rebecca Haller from TheHT Institute in BoulderColorado will or hastaught a course in HT.This course is certified by</p><p>AHTA and ..</p><p>Legacy Foundation andTheresa Hazen</p><p>Will hold a symposium???</p><p>Etc.</p><p>NEVERDOUBTTHATASMALLGROUPOFTHOUGHTFUL, COMMITTEDCITIZENSCAN</p><p>CHANGETHEWORLDINDEED, ITISTHEONLYTHINGTHATEVERHAS. MARGARETMEAD</p><p>Website Information</p><p>California Chapter</p><p>WWW.CAAHTA.ORG</p><p>National Organization</p><p>WWW.AHTA.ORG</p><p>To Reflect and PonderHappy New Year 2009</p><p>The California Chapter of AHTA gets ready for the new , as we Reflect on 20and Ponder the New Year. The enthusiasm and desire to grow and continexpanding has become obvious and contagious. Students, HTRs, AlliProfessionals, HT Program Developers and Directors, Landscapes ArchitecLandscape Designers and the public want the connection. Stay tuned in for udates on the website. And now, in this newsletter join us for a walk throu2008. We wish you a Happy and Prosperous 2009.</p><p>A Historical Perspective of the California Chapter AHTAby Leigh Anne Starling, HTR</p><p>In 1986, the original California Chapter was started by Ida Cousino, an occupational therapist at the</p><p>Vets Garden, located at the Los Angeles Veterans Hospital. After 10 years in Southern California,</p><p>many successful meetings and membership, the chapter moved up the coast to San Louis Obispo in</p><p>1996. Chapter President Derron Dike maintained the chapter during this transition time and started</p><p>the Chapter tradition of participating in the Annual San Francisco Flower and Garden Show. American</p><p>Horticultural Therapy Association member Leigh Anne Starling joined the California Chapter during tha</p><p>time to meet other fellow HTs and volunteered to serve as the Northern California representative.</p><p>In the fall of 1997, a group of individuals gathered in Northern California to discuss horticultural therap</p><p>and the feasibility of starting a local chapter in support of the American Horticultural Therapy Associa-</p><p>tion. Leigh Anne worked with this group as a representative of the existing chapter at that time. After</p><p>much discussion, it was decided to form as a local Bay Area chapter of AHTA. AHTA approved the inco</p><p>poration of the Northern California Chapter under the name People Plant Connection of Northern Cali-</p><p>fornia. The Northern Chapter held its first board meeting in fall 1998 and its first official chapter meeting in spring 1999. A Chapter newsletter started under the first president, Karen Talbot. As the chapt</p><p>began to grow and membership expanded, so did the newsletter. Meetings were held at such places a</p><p>Kainos Home and Training Center, Elkus Youth Ranch, Strybing Arboretum, and Heather Farms. In</p><p>2002, the annual meeting was held at Abilities United, then called Community Association for Rehabili</p><p>tation, located in Palo Alto. In 2002, the chapter membership voted to expand the chapter throughout</p><p>the state and change the name to the California Chapter of the American Horticultural Therapy Associa</p><p>tion.</p><p>It was shortly afterwards that Leigh Anne, president of the People Plant Connection, the northern re-</p><p>gion, approached Derron Dike, president of the California Chapter, southern region, to merge the two</p><p>chapters. In the fall of 2003, a meeting was held at Descanso Gardens in Southern California where</p><p>the two regions voted to merge the treasury accounts and become one state chapter! The chapter had</p><p>many successful years with shared leadership between the two regions. Under the presidency of Lind</p><p>Mann, the chapter held successful meetings at Sherman Library and Gardens, the Vets Garden, Des-</p><p>canso Gardens, the Huntington Botanical Gardens, and Gamble Gardens. The newsletter has expandeto become a work of art and information. Membership expanded throughout the state and at one time</p><p>reached 96 members. The chapter continued to host an exhibit at the San Francisco Flower and Gar-</p><p>den Show for 10 consistent years. In the present time, with the assistance of president Patty Dunks,</p><p>the Chapter website was becoming an important means of communication and information. We also</p><p>held celebrations in honor of the chapter closing, our two great Garden Parties, at Fioli Gardens and</p><p>Descanso Gardens.</p><p>Most recently, the American Horticultural Therapy has had to restructures its chapter system forcing</p><p>many chapters to close. As most of the membership knows, the chapter is closing for now hoping to</p><p>reopen in the future under a new system in compliance with the American Horticultural Therapy Assoc</p><p>tion. At this time, the most important thing that you can do to support the field of horticultural therapy</p><p>is to join AHTA. Without AHTA, there will be no opportunity for horticultural therapist and like-minded</p><p>individuals to come together and form a chapter. And we do hope to come together again in the near</p><p>future to share what we have shared with all of you for the past 11 years, the passion for horticultura</p><p>therapy, the people-plant connection.</p><p>American Horticultural Therapy Association</p><p>CALIFORNIA CHAPTER</p><p>NEWSLETTER</p><p>Formerly known as</p><p>People Plant ConnectionA publication of the</p><p>California Chapter, AHTAFall/Winter 2008</p><p>Volume 10, Issue 3</p><p>MARK YOUR CALENDERS</p><p>San Francisco FlowerShow, San Mateo, CA</p><p>March 18-22, 2009</p><p>An exhibit incorporatingelements of accessibledesign will be on displayin the main theme gar-dens.</p><p>HT Institute, San Fran-cisco Botanical Gardens,February 19-22, 2009</p><p>Rebecca Haller from TheHT Institute in Boulder</p><p>Colorado will teach thecourse HorticulturalTherapy Management.See the HT Institute website for more information.</p><p>Legacy RehabilitationServices, Portland, OR,May 16, 2009</p><p>2009 Adult Rehabiltationin the Garden: Tools forFuntional TherapeuticOutcomes. Info: TeresiaHazen, 503-413-6507,</p><p>NEVERDOUBTTHATASMALLGROUPOFTHOUGHTFUL, COMMITTEDCITIZENSCANCHANGETHE</p><p>WORLDINDEED, ITISTHEONLYTHINGTHATEVERHAS. MARGARETMEAD</p><p>Website Information</p><p>California Chapter</p><p>WWW.CAAHTA.ORG</p><p>National Organization</p><p>WWW.AHTA.ORG</p><p>To Reflect and PonderHappy New Year 2009</p><p>The California Chapter of AHTA gets ready for the new , as we Reflect on 20and Ponder the New Year. The enthusiasm and desire to grow and continexpanding has become obvious and contagious. Students, HTRs, AlliProfessionals, HT Program Developers and Directors, Landscapes ArchitecLandscape Designers and the public want the connection. Stay tuned in for udates on the website. And now, in this newsletter join us for a walk throu2008. We wish you a Happy and Prosperous 2009.</p><p>A Historical Perspective of the California Chapter AHTAby Leigh Anne Starling, HTR</p><p>In 1986, the original California Chapter was started by Ida Cousino, an occupational therapist at the</p><p>Vets Garden, located at the Los Angeles Veterans Hospital. After 10 years in Southern California,</p><p>many successful meetings and membership, the chapter moved up the coast to San Louis Obispo in</p><p>1996. Chapter President Derron Dike maintained the chapter during this transition time and started</p><p>the Chapter tradition of participating in the Annual San Francisco Flower and Garden Show. American</p><p>Horticultural Therapy Association member Leigh Anne Starling joined the California Chapter during tha</p><p>time to meet other fellow HTs and volunteered to serve as the Northern California representative.</p><p>In the fall of 1997, a group of individuals gathered in Northern California to discuss horticultural therap</p><p>and the feasibility of starting a local chapter in support of the American Horticultural Therapy Associa-</p><p>tion. Leigh Anne worked with this group as a representative of the existing chapter at that time. After</p><p>much discussion, it was decided to form as a local Bay Area chapter of AHTA. AHTA approved the inco</p><p>poration of the Northern California Chapter under the name People Plant Connection of Northern Cali-</p><p>fornia. The Northern Chapter held its first board meeting in fall 1998 and its first official chapter meeting in spring 1999. A Chapter newsletter started under the first president, Karen Talbot. As the chapt</p><p>began to grow and membership expanded, so did the newsletter. Meetings were held at such places a</p><p>Kainos Home and Training Center, Elkus Youth Ranch, Strybing Arboretum, and Heather Farms. In</p><p>2002, the annual meeting was held at Abilities United, then called Community Association for Rehabili</p><p>tation, located in Palo Alto. In 2002, the chapter membership voted to expand the chapter throughout</p><p>the state and change the name to the California Chapter of the American Horticultural Therapy Associa</p><p>tion.</p><p>It was shortly afterwards that Leigh Anne, president of the People Plant Connection, the northern re-</p><p>gion, approached Derron Dike, president of the California Chapter, southern region, to merge the two</p><p>chapters. In the fall of 2003, a meeting was held at Descanso Gardens in Southern California where</p><p>the two regions voted to merge the treasury accounts and become one state chapter! The chapter had</p><p>many successful years with shared leadership between the two regions. Under the presidency of Lind</p><p>Mann, the chapter held successful meetings at Sherman Library and Gardens, the Vets Garden, Des-</p><p>canso Gardens, the Huntington Botanical Gardens, and Gamble Gardens. The newsletter has expandeto become a work of art and information. Membership expanded throughout the state and at one time</p><p>reached 96 members. The chapter continued to host an exhibit at the San Francisco Flower and Gar-</p><p>den Show for 10 consistent years. In the present time, with the assistance of president Patty Dunks,</p><p>the Chapter website was becoming an important means of communication and information. We also</p><p>held celebrations in honor of the chapter closing, our two great Garden Parties, at Fioli Gardens and</p><p>Descanso Gardens.</p><p>Most recently, the American Horticultural Therapy has had to restructures its chapter system forcing</p><p>many chapters to close. As most of the membership knows, the chapter is closing for now hoping to</p><p>reopen in the future under a new system in compliance with the American Horticultural Therapy Assoc</p><p>tion. At this time, the most important thing that you can do to support the field of horticultural therapy</p><p>is to join AHTA. Without AHTA, there will be no opportunity for horticultural therapist and like-minded</p><p>individuals to come together and form a chapter. And we do hope to come together again in the near</p><p>future to share what we have shared with all of you for the past 11 years, the passion for horticultura</p><p>therapy, the people-plant connection.</p></li><li><p>8/4/2019 Fall-Winter 2008 Newsletter California Horticultural Therapy</p><p> 2/6</p><p>CAAHTAFall/Winter 2008 Page 2</p><p>Presidents Message..Holiday greetings to all of you. This has certainly been a year of change for AHTA, and a challenging one for the board. The</p><p>decision to close the chapters brought about by changes and restructuring at the national level has required the board to</p><p>spend many extra hours struggling with what is best for the California Chapter.</p><p>In spite of that, we have had a busy year. Our first activity this year was making and staffing a booth at the San Francisco</p><p>Garden Show. Derron Dike did a wonderful job coordinating and organizing the booth. I saw many of you there and we made</p><p>many new contacts as well. We had two site visits this spring, a Northern California visit to the Pomeroy Center where RobertNegro, Director took us on a tour and explained their fabulous program. Our Southern California site visit was to Sojourn, a</p><p>womans shelter where we were treated to a meal from the garden and a tour where we got a chance to see the special heal-</p><p>ing that takes place in the garden. In May, several of us volunteered to do a hort. therapy activity for the Saving Strokes Day,</p><p>where we connected with many folks who have had a stroke. Our two Garden Parties, held at Descanso and Filoli, we had an</p><p>opportunity to reconnect and play in the Garden in two spectacular settings.</p><p>I want to thank our board for all their hard work and dedication over the past year. Linda Mann, past President who mailed</p><p>our newsletters and organized our Descanso Garden Party, Derron Dike our treasurer, Marlene Javage, our Southern California</p><p>VP and newsletter editor, Suzanne Redell, our Northern Calif. VP, who organized our site visits, Leigh Anne Starling , our mem-</p><p>bership chair, and who organized our H.T. activities for both our garden parties, and Deb Ringler, past board member who filled</p><p>in on our board. I appreciate all your effort extend a thank you on behalf of the California Chapter.</p><p>At this time of the year, we all look back at all we have to be grateful for and one of those things is the opportunity to be</p><p>connected with all of you with through horticultural therapy. Even though this chapter is closing, we will be morphing into an-</p><p>other form and are hoping to stay together as a networking group. You, our members are the treasured asset. We will be send-ing out an email with the new web address so that we can stay in touch.</p><p>It has been my privilege to serve as president of the California Chapter of AHTA this past year. I enjoyed connecting with</p><p>you this past year and look forward to continuing that connection. Patty Dunks</p><p>Orange Coast College Horticulture Deparment introduces Horticulture Therapy</p><p>The Department of Horticulture at Orange Coast Col-lege is introducing Service Orientated Horticultureclasses. The trend in horticulture the past 15 years,especially during the personal garden revolution, the</p><p>expansion of technology and the awareness of our dependency on the health of the planet.has opened amature door in horticulture. People are indeed in theneed of plants for our health and well being. Plants arno longer relegated to just ornament or agriculture,plants are a integral part of our lives on many levels.This awareness has finally broken into the mainstreamconsciousness...Green has become the preferentialoption. Horticulture Therapy is no longer just for severrehabilitation institutions. HT is needed on many levelof healing and growing.Marlene Javage introduced the field of HT to 20 stu-dents for 8 weeks at OCC. The class was composed o</p><p>curious students, individuals desiring to explore newcareers and allied professionals wanting to add an-other tool to their profession. I was moved and moti-vated by the depth of caring and interest this group ofstudents brought to the classroom. In addition to learning the specific distinctions and needs of a registeredHT, the class visited 3 sites; including Long BeachVets Garden. Descanso Gardens HT program (duringthe Annual Conference) and St. Clares Garden in Bre(designed for people in recovery). For further information regarding classes in Horticulture at Orange CoastCollege in Co...</p></li></ul>