Chemistry 101-01 - Troy 101-01 Introduction to Chemistry Chapter 1 What is Chemistry? Chapter 2 The Numerical Side of Chemistry

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  • Chemistry 101-01 Introduction to Chemistry

    Syllabus, Fall 2004 Instructor: Mary C. Setzer E-mail: msetzer@chemistry.uah.edu Office: WH 342 Telephone: 824-3259 FAX: 824-6349 Office Hours: Mondays and Wednesdays 1:00 pm 3:00 pm, or by appointment Textbook & other materials: Required: Russo & Silver, Introductory Chemistry, 2

    nd Ed., a basic

    scientific calculator such as the TI 30-X or Casio fx-260, which are available for about $10 (you need to be able to work with scientific notation, take square roots, and do logarithms/antilogarithms cell phones may not be used as calculators, no calculators that store equations such as the TI-86, etc. may be used), and The Prentice Hall Molecular Model Set for General and Organic Chemistry. Optional study guide: McGuire, Study Guide and Selected Solutions for Introductory Chemistry, 2

    nd Ed. Additionally lecture

    notes will be available on the UAH WebCT site (http://classweb.uah.edu). I will use these notes during my class lectures. These notes are designed to complement lecture attendance and your textbook, and not to replace them. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to access and print these files; you can download this program free from http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep.html. Examinations and Grading: There will be four examinations throughout the term worth 100 points each. A missed exam or the lowest exam score can be exchanged for a makeup test given at the end of the semester. There will be no special, early, or late exams. All makeup exams will be given during the last regular class meeting. You must request a makeup exam via email; you will be given the deadline to do this as the date draws near. The examinations will be based upon class lectures, textbook reading, assigned homework problems, and in-class demonstrations. There will also be a comprehensive final exam, worth 200 points. You will be given a seating chart for exam days; you must sit in your assigned seat on exam days. Note: bring a #2 pencil and the basic scientific calculator to all exams. You will be able to access your grades throughout the term by logging into the UAH WebCT site. Final grades will be based on your performance on the four exams and the final examination. There are 600 points possible. Grades will be assigned based upon the following breakdown:

    >540 A

    480-539 B 420-479 C 360-419 D

  • to come to all of the lectures on time and prepared to cover the material at hand, to ask questions, and to go over problems), to read (and re-read, if necessary,) the textbook, to work all of the homework problems, and not to fall behind. If you find yourself not grasping the material sufficiently, please get help immediately. Office hours are available and I encourage you to come and get help. Additionally, chemistry students can obtain free tutorial services from graduate students in the Chemistry Departments Tutorial Room, MSB 200; a schedule for this semester will be posted. Complaint Procedure: If you have difficulties or complaints related to this course, your first action should be to discuss them with your instructor. If such a discussion would be uncomfortable for you or fails to resolve your difficulties, you should contact Professor James K. Baird, Chair of the Chemistry Department. His telephone number is 824-2416. If you still are unsatisfied, you should discuss the matter with Dr. Debra Moriarity, Associate Dean of the College of Science. Dean Moriarity's phone number is 824-6605. Special Needs Students: If you have special needs for this class which require a modification of seating, testing, or other class procedures you must discuss them fully with the instructor during the first two weeks of class. 2004 Setzer

    Chemistry 101-01 Introduction to Chemistry

    Calendar, Fall 2004 Monday August 30 Introduction

    Wednesday September 1 Lecture Chapter 1 What is Chemistry?

    Friday September 3 Lecture Chapter 2 The Numerical Side of Chemistry

    Monday September 6 Labor Day NO CLASS!

    Wednesday September 8 Lecture Chapter 2 The Numerical Side of Chemistry

    Friday September 10 Lecture Chapter 3 The Evolution of Atomic Theory

    Monday September 13

    Lecture Chapter 3 The Evolution of Atomic Theory

    Last day to drop with refund

    Wednesday September 15

    Lecture Chapter 4 The Modern Model of the Atom

    Friday September 17

    Lecture Chapter 4 The Modern Model of the Atom

    Monday September 20

    Lecture Chapter 5 Chemical Bonding and Nomenclature

    Wednesday September 22

    Lecture Chapter 5 Chemical Bonding and Nomenclature

    Friday September 24

    Lecture Chapter 5 Chemical Bonding and Nomenclature

  • Monday September 27

    EXAM I (Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

    Deadline to change credit to audit

    Wednesday September 29

    Lecture Chapter 6 The Shape of Molecules (bring models)

    Friday October 1 Lecture Chapter 10 Intermolecular Forces & the Phases of Matter

    Monday October 4 Lecture Chapter 7 Chemical Reactions

    Wednesday October 6 Lecture Chapter 7 Chemical Reactions

    Friday October 8 Fall Break NO CLASS!

    Monday October 11 Lecture Chapter 8 Stoichiometry and the Mole

    Wednesday October 13 Lecture Chapter 8 Stoichiometry and the Mole

    Friday October 15 Lecture Chapter 9 The Transfer of Electrons

    Monday October 18 Lecture Chapter 9 The Transfer of Electrons

    Wednesday October 20 EXAM II (Chapters 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)

    Friday October 22 Lecture Chapter 11 What if There Were no Intermolecular Forces?

    Monday October 25 Lecture Chapter 11 What if There Were no Intermolecular Forces?

    Wednesday October 27 Lecture Chapter 12 Solutions

    Friday October 29 Lecture Chapter 12 Solutions

    Monday November 1 Lecture Chapter 13 When Reactants Turn to Products

    Wednesday November 3 Lecture Chapter 13 When Reactants Turn to Products

    2004 Setzer

    Friday November 5

    Lecture Chapter 14 Chemical Equilibrium

    Monday November 8

    Lecture Chapter 14 Chemical Equilibrium

  • Wednesday November 10

    EXAM III (Chapters 11, 12, 13, 14)

    Last Day to Withdraw from Fall Classes

    Friday November 12 Lecture Chapter 15 Acids and Bases

    Monday November 15 Lecture Chapter 15 Acids and Bases

    Wednesday November 17 Lecture Chapter 15 Acids and Bases

    Friday November 19

    Lecture Chapter 17 The Chemistry of Carbon (bring models)

    Monday November 22

    Lecture Chapter 17 The Chemistry of Carbon (bring models)

    Wednesday November 24

    Thanksgiving Holiday NO CLASS!

    Friday November 26

    Thanksgiving Holiday NO CLASS! UAH Closed

    Monday November 29

    Lecture Chapter 17 The Chemistry of Carbon (bring models)

    Wednesday December 1

    Lecture Chapter 17 The Chemistry of Carbon (bring models)

    Friday December 3

    Lecture Chapter 18 Synthetic and Biological Polymers

    Monday December 6

    Lecture Chapter 18 Synthetic and Biological Polymers

    Wednesday December 8

    EXAM IV (Chapters 15, 17, 18)

    Friday December 10

    MAKEUP EXAM DAY

    Wednesday December 15

    8:00 A.M. FINAL EXAMINATION CH

    101-01 {Exam is 120 multiple choice

    questions, 120 minutes} 2004 Setzer

    Chemistry 101-01 Introduction to Chemistry

    WebCT Log in

  • Fall 2004 WebCT ID and Password To login to a WebCT course, you will need two pieces of information: a WebCT ID (or user name) and a password. Your WebCT ID is the first part of your UAH e-mail address, the part before the "@" symbol. Your initial WebCT password is the last four digits of your social security number. For example, if John Doe's UAH e-mail address is doejohn@email.uah.edu and his student number is 555-77-9999, he would have the following WebCT ID and password: WebCT ID: doejohn Password: 9999 If you do not know what your UAH e-mail address is, try one or more of the following:

    Go to the student registration website at http://register.uah.edu and then login to Student Services. Under Personal Information, click View E-mail Addresses to find your UAH e-mail address.

    Search for your e-mail address via the UAH directory search.

    Search for your e-mail address at http://www.uah.edu/email.html.

    Ask your instructor. If you are still unable to determine your UAH e-mail

    address, contact the Information Services help desk at 824-HELP or Charger Central at 824-7777. Neither the help desk nor Charger Central provide support for WebCT, so only ask for your UAH e-mail address.

    Logging in to WebCT Once you have your WebCT ID and password, you are ready to login to WebCT.

    1. Start your web browser (see next section for web browser information) and go to http://classweb.uah.edu

    2. Click the WebCT logo or the Login to WebCT link.> 3. Enter your WebCT ID and password and click Log in. 4. The first time you login to WebCT, you will be

    prompted to enter a password hint question and answer. By providing this information, you will be able to have WebCT reset your password should you forget it. As you enter this information, be sure to enter a valid e-mail address. It does not have to be your UAH e-mail address. However, if you enter your UAH e-mail

  • address, be sure to enter the full address in this format: userid@email.uah.edu. (Do not use userid@webmail.uah.edu; this is not a valid address format.)

    5. After logging in, you will see the myWebCT page. You may wish to change your password by clicking the Change Password link. To access a course, click on the course title that you want to enter (under Courses). You may notice that if you have multiple courses that use WebCT, they all show up here on the myWebCT page.

    Note: You may log out of WebCT from the myWebCT page or from within any course. Just click the Log Out link in the upper right-hand corner of the window. WebCT Technical Requirements Since you will access WebCT over the World Wide Web, your computer must be able to connect to the Internet. While most popular web browsers will work, you may encounter problems if you are not using a WebCT-approved browser. For more information about setting up your web browser for use with WebCT, go to http://www.webct.com/tuneup 2004 Setzer WebCT Troubleshooting If you receive the Error: Authorization Required error

    message, check the following: make sure you are entering the correct WebCT ID and

    password make sure that you enter the WebCT ID in all lower

    case letters if you have changed your password, make sure that

    you enter it exactly as you typed it in when you changed it

    if you are using the numeric keypad to enter the password, make sure that the NumLock is on

    if you have forgotten your password, use the WebCT Password Reset System

    if the WebCT Password Reset System does not work, contact your instructor so that he or she can reset your password manually

    if none of the above solves your problem, contact the WebCT administrator at webct@classweb.uah.edu; include the following information in your message: o your full name

  • o the email address to which you wish to receive a reply

    o your course prefix and number o your instructor's name and email address o the user name and password you are attempting to

    use o steps you have already taken to resolve the problem

    or any other information that may be relevant If you get a blank page when you try to login to WebCT:

    It is possible that the server is temporarily unavailable. Try refreshing (or reloading) the page in your web browser (look in the View menu).

    It is also possible that you are behind a firewall that does not recognize port 3500. WebCT runs on port 3500 and your firewall must allow traffic to and from that port. If you are at a business/school/government location, this is likely the cause of the problem. Contact your network administrator to report the issue and inquire about opening traffic to port 3500.

    If you do not see any courses listed on your my WebCT page: contact your instructor to make sure he/she has added

    your name to the course if you are a new student who has registered late, it may

    take a couple of days to get your e-mail account set up, which delays the set up of your WebCT account; in this case, your instructor should contact the WebCT administrator

    For other information regarding WebCT, look at Student Support (http://classweb.uah.edu/student/index.htm) 2004 Setzer

    Chemistry 101-01 Introduction to Chemistry

    Homework Problems These are the end-of-chapter problems; you are also encouraged to work all red-numbered (those have answers in the back of the book) practice problems in each chapter. There are many more red-numbered, end-of-chapter problems; you are not limited to doing only these! Practice, practice, practice. Chapter 1 What is Chemistry? 22, 26, 31, 33, 38, 40, 53, 57, 72, 74, 86, 88 Chapter 2 The Numerical Side of Chemistry 64, 67, 71, 75, 80, 85, 93, 98, 100, 104, 112, 114, 116,

  • 120, 123, 125, 138, 146, 150, 188 Chapter 3 The Evolution of Atomic Theory 27, 30, 38, 64, 70, 80, 96, 102, 117 Chapter 4 The Modern Model of the Atom 56, 59, 69, 80, 84, 85, 95, 99, 108, 118, 133, 139, 141, 149, 162, 171 Chapter 5 Chemical Bonding and Nomenclature 56, 63, 65, 71, 75, 85, 94, 96, 108, 114, 121, 124, 132, 143, 146, 152, 156, 171 Chapter 6 The Shape of Molecules (Use your models, they help!) 16, 18, 23, 25, 26, 32, 37, 38, 41, 43, 45, 47, 49, 51, 74, 81, 86 Chapter 10 Intermolecular Forces & the Phases of Matter 20, 31, 38, 51, 58, 60, 62, 64, 66, 68, 73, 75 Chapter 7 Chemical Reactions 27, 28, 31, 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 46, 50, 77, 82, 97 Chapter 8 Stoichiometry and the Mole 37, 41, 54, 61, 67, 68, 73, 78, 80, 82, 83, 88, 96, 98, 102, 109, 133 Chapter 9 The Transfer of Electrons 39, 42, 44, 58, 59, 65, 66, 79, 86, 89, 91, 93, 99, 107, 125, additional problems on WebCT Chapter 11 What if There Were no Intermolecular Forces? 25, 30, 32, 35, 43, 48, 50, 55, 57, 67, 69, 81, 90, 91, 96, 114 Chapter 12 Solutions 43, 59, 65, 69, 76, 106, 112, 114, 116, 122, 124, 128, 132, 137, 157, 161, 169, 198, 202, 213 Chapter 13 When Reactants Turn to Products 38, 50, 55, 58, 74, 113, 115, 120 Chapter 14 Chemical Equilibrium 51, 61, 65, 71, 76, 78, 85, 87, 90, 103, 108, 118 Chapter 15 Acids and Bases 74, 76, 78, 79, 101, 107, 111, 120, 122, 133, 148, 149, 151, 154, 157, 161, 183, 186, 190, 195, 215, 220 Chapter 17 The Chemistry of Carbon 25, 26, 31, 37, 41, 45, 48, 51, 53, 56, 66, 68, 70, 72, 78, 83, 88, 90, 110, 115, 116 Chapter 18 Synthetic and Biological Polymers 12, 13, 15, 20, 24, 32, 34, 39, 40, 42, 49 and Chapter 12 problem 12.103 2004 Setzer

  • Strategies for College Success Remember, youre not in high school any more. Things are different: expectations are much higher and the pace is faster. Help is out there, but you have to realize you need it and ask for it. Results of a study by Landis, California State, 1995:

    Students with GPA > 3.7 Students with GPA < 2.0

    Study > 30 hrs/wk out of class. Reviewed material before class. Stayed 1-2 chapters ahead. Reviewed notes after class. Visited the professor/instructor. Studied in groups of 3-5 several times per week. Asked many questions.

    Study 8-10 hrs/wk out of class. Didnt review material before class. Stayed 1-2 chapters behind. Didnt look at notes after class. Rarely discussed class work with others. Rarely asked questions. In effect, they are still in high school.

    Take steps to succeed: Go to class, arrive on time, sit up front, and stay awake. Talk with your teachers in and after class, during office

    hours. Recopy lecture notes

    Group effort (make sure you get all the information, teaching others will help you learn)

    Correlate your notes with the book Go over old exams and sample tests. Dont just memorize

    the answers. Do learn how to work them. Group Study

    You learn by teaching Youll get more done because you wont get

    stuck on specific problems. You wont miss important stuff. You will identify the material you dont know.

    Remember: You always know the answer until someone asks you the question.

    If you dont know it, it WILL be on the exam.

  • Practice, practice, practice! Math problems require repetition. Exam requires rapid recognition of solution strategy practice helps. Put practice problems on note cards and work them at odd times.

    Get help early on in the semester Utilize office hours Visit the tutorial room Do not procrastinate

    Learn to manage and schedule your time. Prioritize Schedule. Keep track of what will be done when and

    where; account for all of your activities. NOTE: 10 pm 2 am are not the best study hours.

    Intense Study Session 2-5 min: Set goals for the next 40 min. 20-40 min: Read selectively, highlight important

    information, write notes in the margins, create mnemonics and concept maps, do problems, do problems, do more problems.

    5 min: Review whats just been studied. 10 min: Take a break. Repeat

    Be smart on Exam Day Get up early Shower Dress for Success Eat a good meal Avoid stress

    2004 Setzer Periodic Table of the Elements

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1.008

    H 1

    6.941 Li 3

    9.012 Be 4

    10.811 B 5

    22.990 Na 11

    24.305 Mg 12

    26.982 Al 13

    39.0983 K 19

    40.08 Ca 20

    44.956 Sc 21

    47.90 Ti 22

    50.9415 V 23

    51.996 Cr 24

    54.938 Mn 25

    85.468 Rb

    87.62 Sr

    88.906 Y

    91.22 Zr

    92.9064 Nb

    95.94 Mo

    98.906 Tc

  • 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 132.906

    Cs 55

    137.33 Ba 56

    138.906 La 57

    178.49 Hf 72

    180.948 Ta 73

    183.85 W 74

    186.2 Re 75

    (223) Fr 87

    226.025 Ra 88

    (227) Ac 89

    (25R

    10

    140.12 Ce 58

    140.908 Pr 59

    14N6

    232.038 Th 90

    231.031 Pa 91

    238

    92004 Setzer

  • CH 105

    Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory Fall 2004

    Instructor: Office: e-mail: Office hours: Phone: Books & supplies: Laboratory Manual Chemistry 105, by M. Setzer & W. Setzer, The Prentice Hall Molecular Model Set for General and Organic Chemistry, and a calculator. Clothing: Students must provide the following safety clothing; these items are not furnished. Eye protection is required at all times while in the laboratory; safety glasses or prescription glasses that provide adequate protection of the eyes are acceptable (clear lenses only). If there is a question as to adequate coverage, please consult the Laboratory Manager. Contact lenses are extremely dangerous in a chemistry laboratory and are strongly discouraged. If you insist on wearing contact lenses, you must wear face-fitting goggles and you must identify yourself to your lab instructor. Rubber or latex gloves should be worn while carrying out experimental work, handling chemicals, etc. A laboratory coat or apron is required. If an apron is used, you must also have long sleeves. Long hair must be pulled back or otherwise restrained. Closed-toe shoes must be worn; sandals or any other types of open shoes are prohibited. No roller blades or skates are allowed in the lab. It is also recommended that students bring a roll of paper towels for their own use. General Information: Each laboratory procedure should be carefully studied before the lab session. The pre-lab assignment must be completed prior to the experiment. You will not be allowed to begin an experiment without first completing the pre-lab. If you have not completely read the lab instructions and precautions, you are a hazard to yourself and those around you. The instructor will cover the overall purpose and principles of the experiment at the beginning of the laboratory. If there is anything about the experiment you do not understand, feel free to ask questions at any point. Some equipment must be signed out from the stockroom. This equipment must be returned at the end of your lab period. Report any injuries or chemical spills to your instructor immediately. Attendance and General Citizenship: This is a 100-level course; attendance is mandatory. You are expected to show respect for your instructor and your classmates. Cell phones and pagers must be turned off while you are in lab. You will be required to leave if you do not observe these rules.

    Grading: Grades will be assigned according to the following breakdown:

    Final grades will be assigned according to the average earned using the scheme at left. Percentage scores will correspond to the following letter grades: > 90% A

    Pre-lab and Post-lab Questions 25%

    Experimental Worksheets 65% 80%-89.9% B

    Safety, technique, preparation 10% 70%-79.9% C 60%-69.9% D

    < 60% NC Late papers will be graded down according to the following scheme: two days late, -20%; one week late, -40%; two weeks late, you get NO points. We will accept NO EXCUSES for late laboratory reports. Cheating will not be tolerated. Anyone found cheating will be dealt with according to the UAH Student Handbook. Laboratory techniques and safety practices. These points are based upon the observations of the teaching assistant as to how you conduct yourself in the laboratory (Are you handling noxious chemicals in the fume hood? Are you cleaning up spills on the bench or on the balances? Are you wearing safety glasses? Are you using the equipment and glassware properly?).

  • Punctuality, lab preparation, etc. These points are based upon the observations of the teaching assistant as to whether you are prepared to carry out the day's experiment (Did you come to the laboratory on time and prepared to do the experiment?). Pre-lab questions will be collected by your instructor at the beginning of class. If you are tardy, your pre-lab questions will not be collected or graded for that session (although you should still have them finished in order to have permission to participate in the lab); a grade of zero will be recorded. Three tardinesses will count as one unexcused absence. Quizzes, announced or unannounced, may be given throughout the semester at the discretion of the instructor. If you have an unavoidable absence, CONTACT THE INSTRUCTOR AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. A day will be scheduled at the end of the term to carry out make-ups for excused absences; you must discuss the labs to be made up with your instructor before this day. You must provide documentation as to the cause of the absence in order to be eligible to make up a lab either during the term or on the make up day. An instructor must be present for a student to make up a lab. Adequate notice must be provided to the stockroom to ensure materials can be prepared. The instructor will tell you when the experimental worksheet will be due for the make-up session. Unexcused absences cannot be made up, the worksheet will not be graded, and a grade of zero will be recorded. After two unexcused absences, you will receive a grade of NC for the course. CH 105, Fall 04 2 Glassware: Laboratory glassware is expensive. When experiments are carried out using glassware, some things will get broken and we expect that. However, excessive breakage, or breakage resulting from carelessness are unacceptable laboratory practices---poor laboratory technique, and will be graded accordingly. When you break glassware be sure to dispose of it correctly in the broken glass container, not just in a trash can. For broken thermometers, be sure to clean up the any mercury mess as well as the glass. Safety: Because flammable liquids and corrosive and health-damaging chemicals are frequently encountered in the laboratory; unsafe laboratory practices cannot and will not be tolerated. Anyone observed violating safety rules, which may result in damage to their own health (for example, not wearing safety glasses, handling noxious chemicals outside the hood, etc.), will be reprimanded and graded down on technique. No food or drinks are allowed in the laboratory. All books, coats, backpacks, etc. must be placed on the shelves in the front area of the laboratory. If the safety violation threatens the health or safety of others, the violator will be asked to leave the laboratory. Student refusing to leave will be removed by campus police. Know where the fire extinguisher, safety shower, and eyewash fountain are located. Chemical Waste Disposal: In order to avoid environmental contamination, laboratory chemicals must be disposed of properly. All wastes should be placed in appropriately labeled containers. If you are not sure where to dispose of any waste ask your instructor. Do not pour anything down the sink without explicit instructions to do so. Solid chemical waste is placed in the appropriate chemical waste bucket, NOT IN THE TRASH CAN. Broken glass is placed into the broken glass container, place only broken glass in the broken glass container. Never put solids, organic wastes, or heavy-metal salts down the drain! Schedule: Week Experiment # Experiment

  • 1 Introduction, lab drawer assignment, Lab Safety 2 1 Significant Figures and the Measurement of Density 3 2 Identification of Ions by Flame Tests 4 3 Molecular Models (bring your models) 5 4 Classification of Solid Substances 6 5 Synthesis of Alum 7 6 Precipitation of Calcium Phosphate 8 7 Redox Chemistry: Activity of Metals 9 8 Production of Hydrogen Gas 10 9 Fat Content in Junk Food 11 10 Calorie Counting, Heat of Combustion 12 11 How Do You Titrate Relief? Titration of Antacids 13 Clean Up and Check out, Make-ups Complaint Procedure: If you have difficulties or complaints related to this course, your first action usually should be to discuss them with your instructor. If such a discussion would be uncomfortable for you or fails to resolve your difficulties, you should speak to Mary Setzer, Chemistry Stockroom Manager, phone: 824-3259, email: . If you still are unsatisfied, you should contact Professor James K. Baird, Chair of the Chemistry Department. His telephone number is 824-2416 and his email address is . If you remain unsatisfied, you should discuss the matter with Professor Debra Moriarity, Associate Dean of the College of Science. Dean Moriarity's telephone number is 824-6605 and her email address is . Special Needs Students: If you have special needs for this class, which require a modification of seating or other class procedures, you must discuss them fully with the instructor during the first week of class. Withdrawing from the lab: Withdrawal is not official until it has been processed by the Records Office. Failure to attend lab without an official withdrawal will result in a grade of NC.

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