american ingenuity - houston ballet

Click here to load reader

Post on 29-Jan-2022

4 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

Photo: Alexander Iziliaev
1
Appendices ..................................................... 23-26
American Ingenuity:
Learning Objectives
Students who attend the performance and utilize the study guide will
be able to:
Describe and demonstrate straight, curved and angled shapes as they
relate to dance;
Define and discuss the concept of ingenuity as it applies to choreography
and life;
Describe at least one of the works on the American Ingenuity program
through words or pictures;
Demonstrate appropriate audience behavior.
(5) Historical and cultural relevance. The student examines music in
relation to history and cultures.
§117.205. Dance, Middle School
understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity.
§127.3. Exploring Careers, Middle School
(1) The student explores personal interests and aptitudes as they relate
to education and career planning
§114.22. Languages Other Than English Levels I and II
(4) Comparisons. The student develops insight into the nature of language
and culture by comparing the student's own language and culture to
another.
(5) Critical evaluation and response. The student makes informed
personal judgments about dance and the meaning and role of dance in
society.
(5) Critical evaluation and response. The student makes informed
personal judgments about dance and the meaning and role of dance in
society.
5
ATTENDING A BALLET PERFORMANCE
Going to see a ballet performance is DIFFERENT than going to a movie:
Ballet is performed live. The dancers can see and react to the audience!
Audience members can show the dancers when they appreciate their
performance! If something is funny, you can laugh! If the dancers are doing
a great job, then you can clap!
At the end of the show, the dancers all
bow. This is called a curtain call. If you
really loved the show, you can give the
dancers a standing ovation to show that
you appreciate their hard work!
School clothes are appropriate, but
some people like to dress up for ballet performances.
Just make sure you are comfortable.
Photos by Cameron Durham
Going to see a ballet performance is the SAME as
going to a movie:
theater stays dark during the ballet.
Audience members are expected to stay quietly in their
seats during the performance.
during the performance. This is distracting to the
dancers and other audience members, AND American
Ingenuity is copyrighted artistic material.
All cell phones and other electronic devices should be
powered OFF as soon as you enter the theater.
7
Ingenuity is the quality of being clever, original, and innovative.
Let’s meet some people whose ingenuity has changed their lives and
others!
Dr. José Hernández-Rebollar
Dr. Robollar was born in Puebla, Mexico in 1969. He came to the US
in 1998 as a Fulbright Scholar. He attended George Washington
University where was receive 8 Ph.Ds. Dr. Robollar is most noted for
his invention of the AcceleGlove. This machine translates the
American Sign Language into spoken and written words. Dr.
Robollar says his invention is driven by his desire to help others live
fuller lives.
Mikaila Ulmer
What makes Mikaila’s lemonade different from others is her
recipe. Her special recipe calls from fresh and organic lemons,
mint leaves, and flaxseed which she sources locally from Austin
farmers. Her honey comes from local beekeepers that use
sustainable farming methods to keep the bees safe and
healthy. Mikaila’s unique lemonade recipe is a healthy
alternative to soda and other sugary beverages.
Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs was an American entrepreneur and inventor. He
was most well known as being the co-founder of Apple. He
began his electronics career as a video game designer with
Atari. Mr. Jobs and his co-founder, Steve Wozniak, later started
Apple Computers in 1976. Apple was the most innovative
computer of its time due to its design, cheaper price, and
everyday accessibility for its customers.
Critical Thinking and Writing Opportunity:
Talk with a partner or small group about what makes each of these creations ingenious
(clever, original and innovative). In at least 5 sentences, summarize your findings.
8
What Ingenious Ideas Do YOU Have?
Do you have an idea to make the world a safer, easier place to
live?
Step One: Identify a problem.
Step Two: Brainstorm a solution on your own or with a friend.
Step Three: Draw or write about your solution in the space
below.
9
10
AMERICAN INGENUITY Houston Ballet’s American Ingenuity program features the work of three distinct
and important 20th century American choreographers.
George Balanchine
he enrolled in the Imperial Theatre Ballet School in St.
Petersburg. Balanchine moved to the United States
in 1933 and founded the School of American Ballet
in 1934. Though he was born in Russia, George
Balanchine is considered the father of the American
ballet style. Balanchine took his Russian Classical
base and expanded, heightened, and streamlined it
to fit the overall energy and speed of American
dancers. He was the founding director and primary
choreographer for New York City Ballet until his
death in 1984.
Theme and Variations
World Premiere: 1947
Costume Design: Karinska
Even though he was considered the father of neo-classical ballet, George
Balanchine created Theme and Variations as homage to his past and “to
evoke that great period in classical dancing when Russian ballet flourished with
the aid of Tchaikovsky’s music.” Though the dancers wear traditional tutus and
tunics, the only hint of Classical Era sets are chandeliers hanging.
Joseph Walsh and Artists of Houston Ballet
In George Balanchine’s Theme and Variations
Photo: Amitava Sarkar
Jerome Robbins is world renowned for his work as a
choreographer of ballets as well as his work as a
director and choreographer in theater, movies and
television. Robbins was born in New York, NY in 1918.
When he went to college, he studied chemistry and
modern dance. Robbins decided to make his
career in dance, working in musical productions and
choreography for the American Ballet Theater and
New York City Ballet. Throughout his career, Jerome
Robbins choreographed many ballets, movies, and
Broadway productions, including West Side Story &
Fiddler on a Roof.
Costume Design: Santo Loquasto
Jerome Robbins created Other Dances especially for two very famous ballet
dancers, Gelsey Kirkland and Mikhail Baryshnikov. It is a pas de deux (dance
for two) for a man and woman set to several short piano pieces. He made it
for a fundraiser for the Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center in
New York City. The choreography references one of Robbins’ most famous
ballets, Dances at a Gathering.
Gelsey Kirkland and Mikhail Baryshnikov
In Jerome Robbins’ Other Dances
12
William Forsythe was born and raised in New York and
received his training in Florida. Forsythe danced with the
Joffrey Ballet and later the Stuttgart Ballet, where in 1976
he was appointed Resident Choreographer. Forsythe is
best known for his groundbreaking contemporary dances.
He has incorporated spoken word, experimental music,
and elaborate art installations into many of his dance
pieces.
Costume Design: William Forsythe
Artifact Suite is a group of dances from William Forsythe’s full-length ballet
Artifact (1984). Artifact is remarkable because it is an evening length work,
but there is no story. It is neo-classical. For Artifact Suite, Forsythe selected
duets and several group pieces that push the limits of the dancers’ bodies,
their pointe shoes and the art form of classical ballet.
Artists of Pennsylvania Ballet
Photo: Alexander Iziliaev
What Does NEO-Classical Mean?
The prefix neo comes from Greek and means new. So, neo-classical ballet
means a new version of ballet. Female dancers usually still wear pointe shoes,
and many of the same steps exist in both classical and neo-classical ballet.
In classical ballet, the dancers’ posture is usually upright or vertical. The shapes
are usually balanced and symmetrical, and the dancers make straight shapes.
The costumes and backgrounds of classical ballets are very elaborate. And
classical ballets tell stories and fairy tales.
Sleeping Beauty is an example of a classical ballet. In the photo below, notice
the elaborate sets and traditional tutu and tunic.
Neo-classical ballet, on the other hand, is less rigid and precise than classical
ballet. In neo-classical ballet, more focus is placed on the dancing rather than
the background and costumes. Dancers take their posture off of center,
bending in all different directions. Shapes can be angled and asymmetrical.
The backgrounds and costumes for neo-classical ballets are usually very plain
and simplistic. And there is usually no story in neo-classical ballet. The objective
is to focus all the attention on the technique and ability of the dancers and the
shapes their bodies are making. George Balanchine is considered the father of
Neo-classical ballet.
Four Temperaments by George Balanchine is an example of a neo-classical
ballet. In the photo below, notice that the dancers are wearing practice
clothes, and there are no sets at all.
Artists of Houston Ballet
In George Balanchine’s
Houston Ballet
Photo: Amitava Sarkar
14
It Takes Teamwork: There are 2 in a Pas de Deux!
In ballet, a pas de deux is a dance duet in which two dancers, typically a male
and a female, perform ballet steps together. When a male and female dance
together and support one another, we call this partnering. All three of the
ballets in American Ingenuity feature pas de deux, and they are all different!
In Balanchine’s Theme and Variations, we see traditional Classical Ballet
partnering where the man is helping the woman stay on pointe and lifting her
high in the air.
In Robbins’ Other Dances, we see a combination of ballet partnering and folk
dancing, so sometimes the dancers are holding hands just like you would every
day.
In Forsythe’s Artifact Suite, the dancers use counterbalance, and the men and
women actually pull each other off balance on purpose! They pull away from
one another equally, so that neither one falls down.
Joseph Walsh and Sara Webb
In Balanchine’s Theme and Variations
Photo: Amitava Sarkar
In Robbins’ Other Dances
Artists of Pennsylvania Ballet
Photo: Alexander Iziliaev
1. What does the prefix Neo mean?
2. Compare and contrast the posture, shapes, & design of sets and
costume of classical and neo- classical ballet.
3. What are the differences in the use of partnering or pas de deux in the
3 ballets in American Ingenuity?
*This question can be answered based on the reading or after
the performance for a more detailed response*
16
Why do they wear that?
Dancers, like athletes, have to wear special clothes for both practice and
performance.
Class and Rehearsal:
In rehearsal, both boys and girls wear leotards and tights. Just like football
players at the line of scrimmage, dancers need to move fast. It’s best not to
have lots of clothing in the way to add friction. So dancers and many other
athletes wear extra tight pants to help them move faster and more clearly.
Performances:
Houston Ballet dancers wear all different kinds of costumes, depending on the
ballet they are performing
Photos: Cameron Durham
Photo: Cameron Durham
In classical ballets, women wear tutus, and men wear
tunics. In the photo at right, the Sugar Plum Fairy is
wearing a classical tutu, pointe shoes and tiara. Her
Cavalier is wearing a tunic, tights and ballet slippers.
Pointe shoes are satin ballet slippers that have a hard tip
that allows female dancers dance on the tips of their
toes.
costumes. In the picture
is wearing tights and
ballet slippers, and the
Activity Learning Outcomes
By the end of this activity, student will be able to:
1) Create straight, curved and angled shapes with their own bodies;
2) Critically observe and discuss others’ movement choices;
3) Demonstrate the difference between classical and neo-classical ballet shapes.
In dance, we divide shapes into three categories: straight, curved and angled.
We can see these in the world around us, and we can make them with our bodies.
Straight Curved Angled
Activity 1: The Shapes Around Us
1) Teachers have your students look around your room and find straight shapes.
Remember: we are not looking for geometric shapes necessarily. Anything with a
straight line works.
2) Have a volunteer come to the front of the room (or the center of the circle) and
make a straight shape with his/her body. Try this with a few volunteers.
3) Repeat with Curved and Angled Shapes.
Barbara Bears and Sean Kelly
Photo Credit: Drew Donovan
1) Put on some upbeat music and have the dancers
move around the room. With younger dancers, you
can call out gross motor skills, such as march, hop,
skip, gallop. With older dancers, you can call out
qualitative movements, such as float, creep, dart,
slither, etc.
moving. Call out a kind of shape (straight, curved or
angled). If you are seeing a lot of the same shapes,
encourage dancers to try different levels (low,
middle, high) or different directions, or ask them to
change one body part.
Activity 3: Critical Observation & Discussion
1) When the dancers are comfortable with moving shapes. Break them into two
groups, and ask them to observe one another. This is a great opportunity for
critical thinking and discussion. What do they notice? What do they see? WHY
do they think that? They should answer with evidence in the form of specific
description.
2) NEO-CLASSICAL Extension. One group is the clay, the other the sculptor. The
clay makes a straight shape with his/her body. The sculptor changes the clay’s
shape and makes it a neo-classical shape by creating angles, making it
asymmetrical, taking it off balance, etc. This can be done by the sculptor
actually touching the clay OR the sculptor can copy the clay’s shape and
make a change in his/her body.
Activity 4: Writing Extension
different shapes with their bodies. What kind of
shapes felt most comfortable? Why? What kinds of
shapes did they observe their classmates making?
What was most interesting? Why?
Melissa Hough
Photo: Amitava Sarkar
Shape Curved
Shape Angled
Maria Kowroski and Craig Hall In Jorma Elo’s Slice to Sharp Photo: Paul Kolnick
20
Try making all 5 positions. Which one is hardest?
21
You Try It: All About Arms
Try making all 5 positions. Can you keep your back straight
while you do them?
American Ingenuity
A Y M S F Z E R N S C E Y X S J F L B B Q P C I G
K R P U W Q U W E U H P V T K A L Y D Q C U O Q D
C R A J Z N M A F I O C E J O D K G S M R J X N E
C B P I H M S O H Q R S K Y O C T K F T K Z H A U
S O Q N T V R F L I E Y Y H D Q B H A N T K M N E
T P U U V S V S X K O T T H H C F I N G R J V F L
K V D N Y Z A J L Q G I N S Z E N I H C N A L A B
O U J T T D V Q S Q R U D R C C S N I B B O R B D
A I H A S E K B G Z A N U R A J V T M D L R L V A
G E Y W N Z R I I Q P E E L I M O X D E N Z W X O
H C D I Y N X B C L H G L O V Z U H Y S L T G P H
M C R Q H Y X K A V E N B R H E Y T Y I D G D I X
Q A O T R L O Q V L R I V H D S E K Y G S O H K G
O T U S B H A Q R F A J P E H J E E Q N V X N A V
X T U Y T H Q I J G G N D J C V N T T E W L L X W
G T C O S U V L T O L S C L I K U M N R S C E V Z
K C Z H R X M W Y B A A U E N T U T U I K E N G M
P F F S Y K L E Z P Q L J I U K W Y G X O Q V A M
R Y H C O M P O S E R D O B T A B P U Q C P B V J
P U J Y L T W K N J W J D L H H W Y Y E T P C N O
A O H I X S L D Q E P L W I T D S L P E Z S W N Q
T X E Q J R K U M S L H G T H Z S F U F F D V Y R
H E V N P C W G T L F F G E Z L F Q S X B S W X C
P K X I I B K Q I M C E F Q K A U W C A O P K A B
T A D Z H R N A Y V D G D O Z V M W L P A B Y J D
BALANCHINE
CHOREOGRAPHER
COMPOSER
COSTUMES
COUNTER
BALANCE
Houston Ballet 1955-Today
The mission of Houston Ballet is to inspire a lasting love and appreciation
for dance through artistic excellence, exhilarating performances, innovative
choreography and superb educational programs.
Houston Ballet Foundation was formed in 1955 and Houston Ballet
Academy, a school for nurturing talented dance students with dreams of
professional dancing, was established that same year. In 1969, the professional
resident company was founded drawing upon the strength of the Academy.
In 1976, the Houston Ballet conducted a national and international search
for an Artistic Director. Ben Stevenson, formerly director of the National Ballet of
Washington D.C., Principal Dancer and Ballet Master with the London Festival
Ballet, was hired and served as Artistic Director until 2003. Through his
exceptional leadership and direction, Houston Ballet developed a broad
repertory including both classical and contemporary works as well as an
Academy with a first-rate professional training school.
In 1987, the company moved into its new performing home, the
magnificent Wortham Center, a facility with which few performing arts houses
in the world can compare.
In July 2003, the acclaimed Australian choreographer Stanton Welch
assumed the leadership of Houston Ballet, America's fourth largest ballet
company, as artistic director. Since his arrival, Mr. Welch has transformed
Houston Ballet by raising the level of classical technique, infusing the company
with new energy, drive and vision; introducing works by distinguished
choreographers to the repertoire; and attracting some of the world's best
coaches to Houston to work with the dancers. He has created works for such
prestigious international companies as Houston Ballet, San Francisco Ballet,
American Ballet Theatre, The Australian Ballet, Birmingham Royal Ballet, and
Royal Danish Ballet.
In 2011, Houston Ballet moved into its new home, the largest dance center
in North America, Houston Ballet’s Center for Dance; with over 70,000 square
feet, and a bridge connecting it to the Wortham Theater.
25
Stanton Welch, Artistic Director
Mr. Welch…