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Consulting Cover Letter Monday, April 6, 2015 TO: 4kids1st 2625 Townsgate Rd Ste 330 Westlake Village , CA , 91361 United States FROM: West Coast Consulting 24255 Pacific Coast Hwy Malibu, CA 90263 Attn: Kathy Greco Dear Kathy Greco, Thank you for again for your willingness to work with West Coast Consulting and your continued dedication to 4kids1st. Enclosed is a draft of our final report containing our research, recommendations, and an implementation strategy for 4kids1st. In this report, West Coast Consulting has addressed the objectives initially put forward in our Contract and our Interim Report. West Coast Consulting provides a proposal to solving

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Consulting Cover Letter

Monday, April 6, 2015

TO:4kids1st2625 Townsgate Rd Ste 330Westlake Village, CA, 91361 United States

FROM:West Coast Consulting 24255 Pacific Coast HwyMalibu, CA 90263

Attn: Kathy Greco

Dear Kathy Greco,

Thank you for again for your willingness to work with West Coast Consulting and your continued dedication to 4kids1st. Enclosed is a draft of our final report containing our research, recommendations, and an implementation strategy for 4kids1st. In this report, West Coast Consulting has addressed the objectives initially put forward in our Contract and our Interim Report. West Coast Consulting provides a proposal to solving 4kids1sts business challenge through a Volunteer Acquisition, Management, and Retention Guide.

It was a pleasure working with you and we would like to thank you for your support and assistance and we hope that this can make a difference in the lives of many children and their families!

Best Regards,

West Coast Consulting

Table of Contents

Executive summary...Section 1Introduction..Section 2Methodology.....Section 3Interim Suggestions............Section 4Analysis, Recommendations, and ObservationsSection 5Ways for Implementation..Section 6Conclusion....Section 7Team Portfolio......Section 8Contract....Section 9Interim Report.....Section 10Appendix A.....Section 11Appendix B.....Section 12Appendix C,....Section 13Appendix D....Section 14Appendix E....Section 15Appendix F....Section 16Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide........Section 17Volunteer and Client Survey....Section 18List of potential partnerships...Section 19Parent Mentor Job Description...Section 20VFI Index....Section 21Volunteer Training Manual......Section 22

24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu, CA 90263West Coast [email protected]: 760.212.8244

Executive Summary

West Coast Consulting has been pleased to work with 4kids1st over the past several months to aid the organizations continued mission of excellence in its local community and to the children whom they serve. Upon our initial meeting in January, West Coast Consulting learned of the exciting and successful advocacy programs which 4kids1st provides for youth in the K-12 school system. West Coast Consulting also became aware of the programs need for volunteers. Such programs can be work intensive, and West Coast Consulting was provided the task of identifying strategies of the 21st Century to both research the current nonprofit environment and improve volunteer contributions to the organization through the utilization of such research.As 4kids1st currently lacks volunteers, West Coast Consulting has created a comprehensive Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide through scholarly research which will be highly beneficial to the organizations desire to establish a standardized program for the acquisition, management and retention of volunteers. Through this guide, West Coast Consulting hopes to provide sustained success for 4kids1st by creating a volunteer network for parents to use as resources. In addition, West Coast Consultings resources have also been focused on providing volunteers, specialized in the field of law, that are able to help assist parents in school board meetings. Furthermore, West Coast Consulting has come up with ideas, through intensive research, to aid 4kids1st with the ability to retain their volunteers and maximize their efficiency. West Coast Consulting appreciates the work that 4kids1st provides for the children of the community. West Coast Consulting also appreciates the opportunity to be able to work with Kathy Greco, whose selflessness inspired West Coast Consulting to work hard to generate valuable information, so more children may be able to benefit from 4kids1st in the future.

INTRODUCTION

West Coast Consultings purpose is to establish collaborative relationships with charitable organizations and develop strategies that increase organizational efficiency and effectiveness.

ARTICLE 1: BUSINESS BACKGROUND

1.1 CLIENT4kids1st is a non-profit established by Kathy Greco according to the belief that every kid deserves the opportunity to learn, to build relationships, to have enough nourishment to be able to focus on education, and to be a part of building a better tomorrow regardless of their socio-economic status. Additionally, 4kids1st is an advocacy network created to support families through the Individualized Educational Program (IEP) process of their childs school district and educate families of newly diagnosed children on their rights in this process. President Kathy Greco also conducts Minimum Continuing Legal Education (MCLE) courses in order to better educate the legal community about special education advocacy.

1.2CONSULTANTSWest Coast Consulting is comprised of four Pepperdine University seniors. These students will strive to combine their various skills into a project that will accomplish the goals of 4kids1st enumerated in this contract. Each consultant will bring skills and experience to this project in areas such as business administration, consulting, non-profit management, and social media in order to achieve the objectives set forth by 4kids1st.

ARTICLE 2: BUSINESS CHALLENGE

After meeting with 4kids1st, West Coast Consulting has identified one main business challenge with regards to volunteer acquisition, management, and retention.

2.1 ACQUIRING, MANAGING, AND RETAINING VOLUNTEERS4kids1st has no paid staff and currently no volunteers. Therefore, there is a need for volunteers, specifically parents who have children with disabilities and have learned how to navigate the school system to ensure the special needs of their children are being met. These individuals are uniquely equipped to support other parents whose children are going through the same process, and they can contribute significantly by attending school meetings with these parents and informing them of their rights. Also, professionals and students in the field of law would be ideal volunteers. All current operations are performed almost exclusively by Kathy Greco. In addition, there are no formal documents or procedures in place to manage the volunteers involved with the organization. Once those volunteers are acquired, there will need to be a process to help ensure that they will be retained and continue to volunteer with 4kids1st.

ARTICLE 3: PROJECT OBJECTIVE

3.1VOLUNTEER ACQUISITION AND MANAGEMENT GUIDEWest Coast Consulting is developing and creating the Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide to address 4kids1sts challenges with obtaining and retaining volunteers. As of March 11, 2015, West Coast Consulting has conducted preliminary research and interviews on volunteer acquisition, management, and retention 1) to identify the most effective current techniques being employed by nonprofit organizations and 2) to gather statistical data on volunteer motivations that can be leveraged to distinguish the best candidates for volunteering, 3) to establish partnerships with organizations that can assist with the acquisition of volunteers, and 4) to compile information for the creation of a Volunteer Job Description to be included in the guide.

3.2VOLUNTEER JOB DESCRIPTIONWest Coast Consulting will write and formalize a Volunteer Job Description for future use by 4kids1st which outlines job descriptions for various volunteer positions; most notably the Parent Mentor position. This description includes information like volunteer responsibilities and tasks. West Coast Consulting is currently gathering additional information like qualifications needed, time commitment, expectations for outcomes, and a training and support plan for volunteers in order to establish and manage program and participant expectations

ARTICLE 4: METHODOLOGY

West Coast Consulting conducted primary and secondary research in order to find solutions for 4kis1sts challenge with volunteer acquisition, management, and retention.

4.1VOLUNTEER ACQUISITIONWest Coast Consulting conducted primary (questionnaire and focus group) and secondary research (studies) to discover the most effective volunteer acquisition practices being currently employed by organizations and to identify demographic characteristics and motives that reliably predict subsets of people who are most likely to volunteer. West Coast Consulting also established initial collaboration discussions with the Pepperdine School of Law Special Education Advocacy Clinic and listed other local organizations with which 4kids1st can potentially partner in order to connect volunteers desiring to serve in an advocacy role with children in need of advocacy services.

These findings have been included in the Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide which 4kids1st may use in exploring a collaborative volunteer relationship with organizations like the Pepperdine School of Law Special Education Advocacy Clinic with which West Coast Consulting has established initial collaboration discussions and other local organizations that West Coast

4.2VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENTWest Coast Consulting utilized primary (questionnaire and focus group) and secondary research (studies) to discover the most effective volunteer management practices being currently employed by organizations intended to provide 4kids1st with a strategy to best govern their volunteers.

4.3VOLUNTEER RETENTIONWest Coast Consulting conducted primary and secondary research to discover the most effective volunteer retention practices being currently employed by organizations and to identify volunteer motives that reliably predict subsets of people who are most likely to continue their volunteer contributions after their initial project has been completed.

This research was conducted by several methods, including:1. Reading and analyzing scholarly studies, books, and articles 2. Conducting interviews with various nonprofit organizations3. Receiving information from Kathy regarding desired volunteer roles, duties, and qualifications 4. Conducting student focus groups5. Exploring potential strategic partnerships

4.4PRIMARY DATA RESEARCHWest Coast Consulting created an interview questionnaire which was distributed to three nonprofit organizations and facilitated a focus group in order to identify the best practices related to volunteer acquisition, management, and retention.

4.4.1Questionnaire | Non-profit OrganizationsWest Coast Consulting distributed an interview questionnaire to three (3) nonprofits to identify best practices in the areas of volunteer acquisition, management, and retention. These questionnaires were sent by West Coast Consulting team members to professional contacts with each of the selected organizations with whom the team members have previously established working relationships. West Coast Consulting analyzed the answers provided to help form suggestions shown in the Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide.

4.4.2Focus GroupWest Coast Consulting facilitated focus groups to probe college students perspectives on the most influential ideas identified within the studies researched by West Coast Consulting regarding volunteer acquisition, management, and retention. These groups compiled a list of the most effective practices regarding the three aforementioned categories from their prior volunteering experiences. The focus group allowed West Coast Consulting to use the insight of 12 college students, as well as professional consultant Amy Johnson, to evaluate the most influential theories and practices regarding volunteer acquisition, management, and retention.ARTICLE 5: INTERIM SUGGESTIONS

5.1VOLUNTEER ACQUISITIONWest Coast Consulting used academic journals, data and other published research to conduct extensive research on volunteer acquisition. West Coast Consulting also contacted several nonprofits who have been successful in acquiring volunteers. West Coast Consultings top insights are listed below.

1. Volunteers motivated by the opportunity to express their humanitarian values were more likely to be satisfied than all of the other six motives categories. Perceived meaningfulness of the work is a significant statistical predictor of satisfaction for the values volunteer and can be facilitated by a transformational leader whose behavior influences the extent to which volunteers see their work as personally meaningful. (Dweyer, Bono, Snyder, Nov, and Berson 2013; Appendix C)

2. Volunteers motivated by the opportunity for self-esteem enhancement were more likely to be satisfied than all of the other six motives categories except values. The quality of team relationships is a significant statistical predictor of satisfaction for the enhancement volunteer and can be facilitated by a transformational leader whose behavior affects the quality of team relationships. (Dweyer et al. 2013; Appendix C)

3. As stated by Habitat for Humanity, Our reputation is our biggest selling point, then communicating through social media, emails, and a lot of partners (corporate, church, school groups, civic partners, etc.). (Interview with Tricia Keen 2015; Appendix B)

4. Recruitment of volunteers should be done with a major campaign to address the needs of the agency, the needs of the volunteer, and the needs of the director. (Murk 1991; Appendix C)

5. Presenting a job description to the applicant at the first meeting is crucial. Objectives should be specifically outlined as to the task, duration, duties, and meaning of the voluntary activity. (Ellis 2002; Appendix C)

6. (97%) of people who volunteer do so because they want to help others, (93%) because they enjoy the work, and (89%) because they are personally interested in the specific work or cause for which they volunteer their services. (Murk 1991; Appendix C)

7. Many women use volunteering as a training ground or a stepping stone to paid jobs. (Varner 1983; Appendix C)

5.2VOLUNTEER MANAGMENTWest Coast Consulting researched the best methods and practices in managing volunteers. West Coast Consulting discussed volunteer management with several nonprofits. In addition, West Coast Consulting used academic journals, data and other published research to provide the best insights in regards to volunteer management, which are listed below.

1. Organizations should cultivate transformational leaders and emphasize how volunteering benefits others and makes volunteers feel good. (Dwyer 2013; Appendix C)

2. When training volunteers, one should never assume that they know everything they will need to know about the agency. Everyone needs a good orientation or training program. (Murk 1991; Appendix C)

3. 70% of people surveyed reported that training was an important incentive for participation. (Murk 1991; Appendix C)

5.3VOLUNTEER RETENTIONWest Coast Consulting gained knowledgeable insight on volunteer retention with the help of academic journals, data, other published research and interviews with nonprofits. The research allowed West Coast Consulting to distinguish the following points as the most important in regards to volunteer retention.

1. Volunteers who were motivated to volunteer to gain understanding of others contributed more than all of the other six motives categories. The understanding motive is a significant positive predictor of volunteer contribution beyond the first project. (Dweyer, Bono, Snyder, Nov, and Berson 2013; Appendix E)

2. Volunteers contributed less if motivated by esteem enhancement or social concerns. The enhancement and social motives are significant negative predictors of volunteer contribution beyond the first project. (Dweyer et al. 2013; Appendix E)

3. Unlike their significance in predicting volunteer satisfaction, team leaders transformational leadership behaviors, perceived meaningfulness of the work, and team relationship quality were not significant predictors of volunteer contributions. (Dweyer et al. 2013; Appendix E)

4. As stated by Habitat for Humanity, Thanking volunteers is a huge component (on the day of as well as a follow-up email thanking them, send them photos of the project, link to a survey to get feedback) and post photos on Facebook. (Interview with Tricia Keen 2015; Appendix B)

5. Whether its a formal presentation of a plaque, a handwritten note, or even a personalized form letter handed to the volunteer, the important thing is to let the volunteer know that his or her service is appreciated and to give public recognition of that appreciation. (Varner 1983; Appendix C)

ARTICLE 6: ANALYSIS, OBSERVATIONS, & RECOMMENDATIONS

West Coast Consulting researched primary and secondary sources in order to come up with a solution for Volunteer acquisition, retention, and management. Below is a list of recommendations based upon the analysis and observations that were made.

6.1VOLUNTEER ACQUISITION ACTION POINTS1. Motivation2. Job description3. Public relations

6.2VOLUNTEER ACQUISITION RECOMMENDATIONS AND RESEARCH OBSERVATIONS

6.2.1MOTIVATIONa. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st recruits volunteers who have personal experience with the mission of their organization and who are passionate about helping families i. 97% of people who volunteer do so because they want to help others, 93% because they enjoy the work, and 89% because they are personally interested in the specific work or cause for which they volunteer their services. (Murk 1991; Appendix C)b. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st assesses the motives of new volunteersi. The nonprofit organizations staff must do is to match the individual volunteers abilities, interests, and capabilities, as much as possible, with the job to be done (Varner 1983; Appendix C).

6.2.2JOB DESCRIPTIONc. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st provides potential volunteers with a volunteer job description outlining the details of their positioni. This should include volunteer responsibilities and expectations, as well as the qualifications needed for each positiond. Presenting a job description to the applicant at the first meeting is crucial. Objectives should be specifically outlined as to the task, duration, duties, and meaning of the voluntary activity. (Ellis 2002; Appendix C)

6.2.3PUBLIC RELATIONSe. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st develops their social media platform in order to publicize the work of the organization and recruit volunteersi. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st recruits an intern or volunteer who can manage the 4kids1st website, Facebook page, and Twitter accountf. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st establishes connections with partner organizations i. Focus volunteer acquisition efforts on large organizations like universities that can funnel continuous stream of volunteers ii. These organizations can also assist with pre-screening of ideal candidatesiii. Habitat for Humanity and Healthy Child Healthy World both emphasize the importance of establishing collaborative partnerships for recruiting volunteers

6.3VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT ACTION POINTS1. Orientation and training2. Communication

6.4VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT RECOMMENDATIONS AND OBSERVATIONS

6.4.1ORIENTATION AND TRAININGa. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st ensures volunteers are informed about the history and mission of the organization, and that they are prepared for the tasks they will be giveni. When training volunteers, one should never assume that they know everything they will need to know about the agency. Everyone needs a good orientation or training program. (Murk 1991; Appendix C) b. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st schedules regular training sessions for volunteers to address concerns, offer support, and inform volunteers of updates or changes taking place in organizational programs

6.4.2COMMUNICATIONa. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st assigns volunteers to a specific staff member or volunteer manageri. In many cases, its quite appropriate to designate someone who will be following up with [the volunteer]. You dont have to do everything yourself. In fact, thats one of the shortcomings often found in leaders of volunteers (Rafe 2013; Appendix _ )b. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st initiates personal contact through face-to-face meetings or by phone, rather than email, whenever possible

6.5VOLUNTEER RETENTION ACTION POINTS1. Volunteer satisfaction 2. Acknowledgment and appreciation

6.6VOLUNTEER RETENTION RECOMMENDATIONS AND OBSERVATIONS

6.6.1VOLUNTEER SATISFACTIONa. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st administers volunteer and client surveys consistently via email or phonei. Send a questionnaire to both clients and volunteers on a regular basis to receive their feedback regarding programsii. Use this feedback to strengthen the efficacy of the program and provide a more satisfactory volunteer experience6.6.2ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AND APPRECIATIONa. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st personally and corporately shows appreciation for volunteersb. Acknowledge and celebrate the efforts of individuals as much as possiblei. Habitat for Humanity and Healthy Child Healthy World consider thanking volunteers a huge component of their organizational programs and a main reason volunteers continue to give their timARTICLE 7: STRATEGY FOR IMPLEMENTING THE RESULTS

West Coast Consulting has outlined the following steps for implementing the recommendations for volunteer acquisition, management, and retention set forth in Section 5 of this report. We hope these steps will provide useful methods for executing any of the recommendations previously stated.

7.1VOLUNTEER ACQUISITION IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES

7.1.1MOTIVATION1. In order to find volunteers who are both motivated and connected to the mission of 4kids1st, 4kids1st can contact previous clients of the organization who have experience with the IEP processa. May: begin contacting previous who could serve as potential Parent Mentorsb. June: finalize list of volunteersc. July: begin volunteer orientation and training process (further details in Part III of this section)2. 4kids1st can use the VFI instrument (Appendix) to assess the motives of new voluteers and place them in the appropriate positions that will prove mutually beneficial for both these individuals and the organization a. To be administered in June to final list of volunteers

7.1.2JOB DESCRIPTION1. 4kids1st can provide the attached job descriptions (Section 18) to potential volunteers. This will give these individuals an idea of the role a volunteer plays in the organization and clearly outline the expectations related to the position. a. To be distributed in May during initial volunteer search

7.1.3PUBLIC RELATIONS1. In order for 4kids1st to establish collaborative partnerships with other organizations that can provide both interns and volunteers, West Coast Consulting has compiled a list of potential contacts that can be found in Section 17 of this report. a. West Coast Consulting suggests 4kids1st begins contacting these organizations immediately in order to have strategic partnerships established for the 2015-2016 school year. 2. 4kids1st should use the strategic partnerships established to hire an intern that can manage the social media platform for 4kids1st that was created by the last consulting group.

7.2VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES

7.2.1ORIENTATION AND TRAINING1. Timeline for a new Parent Mentora. July: Volunteer Orientation and Family Placementi. Week 1: orientation and training for volunteersii. Week 2: Parent Mentor has initial intake conversation with potential client; following this conversation, Parent Mentor to meet in person or by phone with 4kids1st representative to discuss Potential Clients situationiii. Week 3: Parent Mentor to review client intake application and draft a brief synopsis for review by 4kids1st representativeb. August-June: School Yeari. Mentor to attend monthly ongoing training for Parent Mentors and Volunteersii. Mentor to attend monthly meeting with parent and 4kids1st staff (to take place the first Wednesday of every month)iii. Mentor to attend school board and IEP meetings with parents as needed, followed by a follow-up meeting with 4kids1st representativeiv. Mentor to communicate with parents, offer support, and answer questions as needed2. Volunteer Training Manual (Section 20)

7.2.2COMMUNICATION1. As soon as a volunteer signs up, 4kids1st should designate a staff contact for this individual and make a welcoming phone call2. Within a week, this staff member should schedule an in-person orientation meeting with the volunteer, if the volunteer was recruited after the July training sessions

7.3VOLUNTEER RETENTION IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES

7.3.1VOLUNTEER SATISFACTION1. West Coast Consulting has created two surveys: one for client satisfaction and one for volunteer satisfaction. These surveys should be sent to clients and volunteers on the first Monday of each month.

7.3.2ACKNOWLEDGEMENT1. Individual appreciation of volunteers can be communicated in numerous ways: through a handwritten note, phone call, social media post, face-to-face conversation, or presentation of a plaque or certificatea. These appreciation gestures should be made monthly2. Corporate appreciation should also be communicated, for instance by having a luncheon or dinner for the volunteers at the end of the school year around the first week of June.

ARTICLE 8: CONCLUSION

West Coast Consulting has been working with 4kids for over four months. West Coast Consulting has researched trends in the nonprofit sector in how to acquire, manage, and maintain volunteers. West Coast Consulting has also interviewed three nonprofits in regards to their volunteer programs. West Coast Consulting has come up with solutions to solve 4kids1st business challenge with strategies provided in a Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide.

West Coast Consulting has conducted intensive research and have made the following recommendations based off the analysis for the Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide.

ACQUISITION1. 4kids1st recruits volunteers who have personal experience with the mission of their organization and who are passionate about helping families2. 4kids1st assesses the motives of new volunteers3. 4kids1st provides potential volunteers with a volunteer job description outlining the details of their position4. 4kids1st develops their social media platform in order to publicize the work of the organization and recruit volunteers5. 4kids1st establishes connections with partner organizations

MANAGEMENT1. 4kids1st ensures volunteers are informed about the history and mission of the organization, and that they are prepared for the tasks they will be given2. 4kids1st schedules regular training sessions for volunteers to address concerns, offer support, and inform volunteers of updates or changes taking place in organizational programs3. 4kids1st assigns volunteers to a specific staff member or volunteer manager4. 4kids1st initiates personal contact through face-to-face meetings or by phone, rather than email, whenever possible

RETENTION1. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st personally and corporately shows appreciation for volunteers2. West Coast Consulting recommends 4kids1st administers volunteer and client surveys consistently via email or phone

West Coast Consulting is excited to see our recommendations and strategies for 4kids1st bring sustained success and growth to the nonprofit. West Coast Consulting hopes that their efforts have increased the chance for every child to have success and happiness in this world.

West Coast Consulting Contract with 4kids1st

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

TO:4kids1st2625 Townsgate Rd Ste 330Westlake Village, CA, 91361 United States

FROM:West Coast Consulting 24255 Pacific Coast HwyMalibu, CA 90263

Attn: Kathy Greco

Dear Kathy Greco,

Thank you for taking the time to meet with us on Sunday, January 25, for our initial meeting and for actively engaging in communication with us since then to help us better understand the services 4kids1st provide and the potential areas for improvement for the organization. We really enjoyed getting to know you and learning about 4kids1st. We are excited to work with you and to form a plan for a better future for children with special needs and their families.Enclosed you will find a contract agreement between 4kids1st and Westcoast Consulting outlining the key objectives we have discussed regarding volunteer acquisition and retention strategies. If you have any questions or would like to suggest changes please email us or contact Michael Swanner directly. If you agree to the terms of this contract, please sign and date the last page and return it to West Coast Consulting by Wednesday, February 4th, 2015.

We look forward to working on this project with you over the next few months.

Best Regards,

West Coast Consulting

INTRODUCTION

West Coast Consultings purpose is to establish collaborative relationships with charitable organizations and develop strategies that increase organizational efficiency and effectiveness.

This contract establishes and manages a working environment:

Between: 4kids1st2625 Townsgate Rd Ste 330Westlake Village, CA, 91361 United States

And: West Coast Consulting24255 Pacific Coast Hwy Malibu, CA 90263

This contract is effective from Thursday, February 5th, 2015 until Monday, April 20th, 2015. This contract binds West Coast Consulting into completing all of the following business challenges for 4kids1st. 4kids1st, in return, will work with West Coast Consulting for the duration of this contract by providing requested information necessary for the completion of their work.

ARTICLE I: BUSINESS BACKGROUNDS

1.1 CLIENT4kids1st is a non-profit established by Kathy Greco according to the belief that every kid deserves the opportunity to learn, to build relationships, to have enough nourishment to be able to focus on education, and to be a part of building a better tomorrow regardless of their socio-economic status. Additionally, 4kids1st is an advocacy network created to support families through the Individualized Educational Program (IEP) process of their childs school district and educate families of newly diagnosed children on their rights in this process. President Kathy Greco also conducts Minimum Continuing Legal Education (MCLE) courses in order to better educate the legal community about special education advocacy.

1.2CONSULTANTSWest Coast Consulting is comprised of four Pepperdine University seniors. These students will strive to combine their various skills into a project that will accomplish the goals of 4kids1st enumerated in this contract. Each consultant will bring skills and experience to this project in areas such as business administration, consulting, non-profit management, and social media in order to achieve the objectives set forth by 4kids1st.

ARTICLE 2: BUSINESS CHALLENGE:

After meeting with 4kids1st, West Coast Consulting has identified one main business challenge with regards to volunteer acquisition and management.

2.1 ACQUIRING AND MANAGING VOLUNTEERS4kids1st has no paid staff and operates entirely from a group of passionate and dedicated volunteers. Therefore, there is a need for more of these volunteers, specifically parents who have children with disabilities and have learned how to navigate the school system to ensure the special needs of their children are being met. These individuals are uniquely equipped to support other parents whose children are going through the same process and assist parents attending school meetings for the first time by informing them of their rights. This task is currently performed by Kathy Greco. In addition, there are no formal documents or procedures in place to manage the volunteers involved with the organization.

ARTICLE 3: PROJECT OBJECTIVE

West Coast Consulting will develop and create a Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide containing:

A plan for acquiring new volunteers consisting of 1) research of existing nonprofit practices and internal motivators 2) identification of unutilized resources and 3) providing innovative solutions for maximizing those resources. A strategy for managing existing volunteers through 1) volunteer retention research focused on existing nonprofit practices and internal motivators and 2) the creation of formal and informal training programs.

This written reports will provide 4kids1st with an increased network of potential volunteers and expand existing organizational resources.

ARTICLE 4: METHODOLOGY

4.1SELECT ORGANIZATIONS4kids1st and West Coast Consulting will collaborate to select between three (3) and five (5) nonprofit organizations to use for research of volunteer acquisition and management strategies.

4.2 RESEARCH VOLUNTEER ACQUISITION AND MANAGEMENTSTRATEGIESWest Coast Consulting will conduct research of the existing nonprofit environment and the selected three (3) to five (5) nonprofit organizations to determine which methods have been the most successful in acquiring and retaining volunteers for programs like 4kids1st.

4.2.1Volunteer Acquisition ResearchWest Coast Consulting will contact existing nonprofits to determine the most effective uses of tools like social media for attracting institutional and individual volunteers and review studies discussing internal motivators that cause people to volunteer.

In addition, West Coast Consulting will analyze the utilization of existing resources like former and current clients and explore the possibility of establishing partnerships with institutions like universities (law schools specifically).

4.2.2Volunteer Management ResearchWest Coast Consulting will contact existing nonprofits to identify effective volunteer retention practices and review studies discussing internal motivators that promote lasting relationships with volunteers.and incorporate these findings into a work plan in a manner that best integrates the findings with the existing framework of 4kids1st.

4.3COLLECT DATAWest Coast Consulting will incorporate interviews and research studies into the Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide. These methods will be conducted in the following ways:

1)Interviews will be conducted with representatives from the selected institutions and nonprofit organizations, and clients and volunteers from 4kids1st to identify volunteer acquisition and retention methods and compile the information necessary for the creation of a formal and informing training program.

2)Observations will be conducted at monthly workshops and at advocacy meetings to compile information necessary for the creation of the formal training program.

3)Online research will be conducted to identify important considerations like volunteer motives and expectations for the acquisition and retention of volunteers.

4.4ANALYZE / COMPILE VOLUNTEER ACQUISITION AND MANAGEMENTGUIDE4.4.1AnalyzeAfter volunteer acquisition and management research and data collection is completed, West Coast Consulting will provide: 1) an overview of the most effective existing practices and philosophies regarding volunteer acquisition and retention 2) an assessment of the current of level of utilization of existing resources 3) recommendation of partnerships to develop and maintain and 4) instructional for the immediate implementation of a formal training program and 5) instructional for the development of an informal network to facilitate and support client education and volunteer training .4.4.2Compile Volunteer Acquisition and Management GuideAll of the above segments will be compiled into the 4kids1st Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide.

4.5 EVALUATE INTERIM PROGRESSAfter establishing contacts and conducting research, West Coast Consulting will collaborate with 4kids1st and present the findings in order to finalize the report.

4.7 FINAL EVALUATIONWest Coast Consulting will provide 4kids1st with a volunteer acquisition and management strategy compiling the research analyzed and data collected regarding volunteer acquisition and retention. This report will apply these research findings directly to the structure of 4kids1st and provide a framework for moving forward.

ARTICLE 5: EXPECTATIONS

5.1 Primary communication between 4kids1st and West Coast Consulting will be done through Slack.

5.2 Direct communication by text will be sent to the primary contact of West Coast Consulting, Michael Swanner.

5.3 All communications will be returned within 24 hours unless special circumstances are addressed.

5.4 Each party will meet when requested to do so at a time that is convenient for both parties.

5.5 A progress report between parties will be given every week.

5.6 Each party will hold themselves to the highest standards of respect and helpfulness to the other party.

5.7 Final report will be presented to 4kids1st in the Pepperdine Communications and Business Building the week of April 20, 2015.

ARTICLE 6: TIMELINE

6.1 Attend parent meeting Wednesday, February 4th 2015.

6.2 Signed contract by Thursday, February 5th, 2015.

6.3 Interim project evaluation meeting by Wednesday, March 18th, 2015.

6.4 Check-in meeting before final presentation by Sunday, April 12, 2015.

6.5 Final Presentation to 4kids1st on Monday, April 20th, 2015.

ARTICLE 7: CONFIDENTIALITY AGREEMENT

Any information provided throughout this project will remain confidential between 4kids1st, West Coast Consulting, Amy Johnson and concerned parties.

ARTICLE 8: FINAL PROVISIONS

8.1 This article is not legally binding

8.2 This contract may be mutually amended by Wednesday, April 15, 2015.

ARTICLE 9: SIGNATURES

West Coast Consulting looks forward to working with 4kids1st in the development of a sustainable volunteer aquisition and management strategy.

Your signature acknowledges agreement to the terms and conditions of this contract between West Coast Consulting and 4kids1st.

Memorandum

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

TO:FROM:Kathy GrecoWest Coast Consulting4kids1stPepperdine University2625 Townsgate Rd Ste 33024255 Pacific Coast HighwayWestlake Village, CA 91361Malibu, CA 90263

This memorandum is to inform 4kids1st of the attached interim progress report detailing West Coast Consultings actual progress with the Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide. In the report, updates are provided on the contractual items, supporting research, current problems and challenges, and other relevant documentation. Michael Swanner will coordinate future communications between 4kids1st and West Coast Consulting to ensure that the needs and concerns of 4kids1st are being addressed in a collaborative manner.

Best Regards,

West Coast Consulting

ARTICLE 1: PROJECT OBJECTIVE

1.1 VOLUNTEER ACQUISITION AND MANAGEMENT GUIDEWest Coast Consulting is developing and creating the Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide to address 4kids1sts challenges with obtaining and retaining volunteers. As of March 11, 2015, West Coast Consulting has conducted preliminary research and interviews on volunteer acquisition, management, and retention 1) to identify the most effective current techniques being employed by nonprofit organizations and 2) to gather statistical data on volunteer motivations that can be leveraged to distinguish the best candidates for volunteering, 3) to establish partnerships with organizations that can assist with the acquisition of volunteers, and 4) to compile information for the creation of a Volunteer Job Description to be included in the guide.

1.2 VOLUNTEER JOB DESCRIPTIONWest Coast Consulting will write and formalize a Volunteer Job Description for future use by 4kids1st which outlines job descriptions for various volunteer positions; most notably the Parent Mentor position. This description includes information like volunteer responsibilities and tasks. West Coast Consulting is currently gathering additional information like qualifications needed, time commitment, expectations for outcomes, and a training and support plan for volunteers in order to establish and manage program and participant expectations.

ARTICLE 2: METHODOLOGY

2.1SELECT ORGANIZATIONSWest Coast Consulting interviewed staff members at the following nonprofit organizations in order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the local and national nonprofit sector. In the local sector, we interviewed a staff member at Healthy Child Healthy World. In the national sector, we will soon interview a staff member from Cameron House. Additionally, we interviewed a staff member from a local branch (Ventura County) of an international organization, Habitat for Humanity. The interview questions and answers can be found in Appendix B.

2.2RESEARCH VOLUNTEER ACQUISITION AND MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

2.2.1 VOLUNTEER ACQUISITION RESEARCHAs of March 11, 2015, West Coast Consulting has conducted research on volunteer acquisition strategies through academic research studies and interviews with staff members of nonprofit organizations. We identified the following notable findings:

1) Volunteers motivated by the opportunity to express their humanitarian values were more likely to be satisfied than all of the other six motives categories. Perceived meaningfulness of the work is a significant statistical predictor of satisfaction for the values volunteer and can be facilitated by a transformational leader whose behavior influences the extent to which volunteers see their work as personally meaningful. (Dweyer, Bono, Snyder, Nov, and Berson 2013; Appendix C)

2) Volunteers motivated by the opportunity for self-esteem enhancement were more likely to be satisfied than all of the other six motives categories except values. The quality of team relationships is a significant statistical predictor of satisfaction for the enhancement volunteer and can be facilitated by a transformational leader whose behavior affects the quality of team relationships. (Dweyer et al. 2013; Appendix C)

3) As stated by Habitat for Humanity, Our reputation is our biggest selling point, then communicating through social media, emails, and a lot of partners (corporate, church, school groups, civic partners, etc.). (Interview with Tricia Keen 2015; Appendix B)

4) Recruitment of volunteers should be done with a major campaign to address the needs of the agency, the needs of the volunteer, and the needs of the director. (Murk 1991; Appendix C)

5) Presenting a job description to the applicant at the first meeting is crucial. Objectives should be specifically outlined as to the task, duration, duties, and meaning of the voluntary activity. (Ellis 2002; Appendix C)

6) (97%) of people who volunteer do so because they want to help others, (93%) because they enjoy the work, and (89%) because they are personally interested in the specific work or cause for which they volunteer their services. (Murk 1991; Appendix C)

7) Many women use volunteering as a training ground or a stepping stone to paid jobs. (Varner 1983; Appendix C)

Further research on volunteer acquisition can be found in Appendix C.

2.2.2VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT RESEARCHAs of March 11, 2015, West Coast Consulting has conducted research on volunteer management strategies through academic research studies and interviews with staff members of nonprofit organizations. We identified the following notable findings:

1) Organizations should cultivate transformational leaders and emphasize how volunteering benefits others and makes volunteers feel good about themselves. (Dwyer 2013; Appendix C)

2) When training volunteers, one should never assume that they know everything they will need to know about the agency. Everyone needs a good orientation or training program. (Murk 1991; Appendix C)

3) 70% of people surveyed reported that training was an important incentive for participation. (Murk 1991; Appendix C)

Further research on volunteer management can be found in Appendix D.

2.2.3VOLUNTEER RETENTION RESEARCHAs of March 11, 2015, West Coast Consulting has conducted research on volunteer retention strategies through academic research studies and interviews with staff members of nonprofit organizations. We identified the following notable findings:

1) Volunteers who were motivated to volunteer to gain understanding of others contributed more than all of the other six motives categories. The understanding motive is a significant positive predictor of volunteer contribution beyond the first project. (Dweyer, Bono, Snyder, Nov, and Berson 2013; Appendix E)

2) Volunteers contributed less if motivated by esteem enhancement or social concerns. The enhancement and social motives are significant negative predictors of volunteer contribution beyond the first project. (Dweyer et al. 2013; Appendix E)

3) Unlike their significance in predicting volunteer satisfaction, team leaders transformational leadership behaviors, perceived meaningfulness of the work, and team relationship quality were not significant predictors of volunteer contributions. (Dweyer et al. 2013; Appendix E)

4) As stated by Habitat for Humanity, Thanking volunteers is a huge component (on the day of as well as a follow-up email thanking them, send them photos of the project, link to a survey to get feedback) and post photos on Facebook. (Interview with Tricia Keen 2015; Appendix B)

5) Whether its a formal presentation of a plaque, a handwritten note, or even a personalized form letter handed to the volunteer, the important thing is to let the volunteer know that his or her service is appreciated and to give public recognition of that appreciation. (Varner 1983; Appendix C)

Further research on volunteer retention can be found in Appendix E.

2.2.4VOLUNTEER JOB DESCRIPTION RESEARCHAs of March 11, 2015, West Coast Consulting has conducted research on the significance of clearly defined volunteer job descriptions and expectations for the acquisition, management, and retention of volunteers and used interviews with 4kids1st personnel and published resources like The Volunteer Recruitment Book to develop volunteer positions and descriptions like Parent Mentor and Student Advocate.

2.2COLLECT DATAWest Coast Consulting utilized the following resources for gathering data for incorporation into the Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide:

1) Pepperdine University Libraries online research center to access peer-reviewed research studies and dissertations on volunteer acquisition, management, and retention.

2) Additional published resources like The Volunteer Recruitment Book on volunteer recruitment and management.

3) An interview questionnaire that was conducted with staff members from each of the selected nonprofit organizations with which our team members have previously established relationships. (Appendix B)

4) An observation to compile information necessary for the creation of the formal training program was conducted at a monthly educational workshop hosted by 4kids1st and the next available observation at an advocacy meeting is awaiting scheduling.

2.3ANALYZE / COMPILE VOLUNTEER ACQUISITION AND MANAGEMENT GUIDE

2.3.1AnalyzeAs of March 11, 2015, West Coast Consulting has conducted preliminary research for the Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide. Upon the finalization of research, the completion of interview questionnaires, and collection of relevant information for the volunteer job description, West Coast Consulting will create a Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide Draft by April 6, 2015.2.3.2CompileWest Coast Consulting has completed 20% of the Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide which includes analysis of research and initial recommendations. West Coast Consulting will complete at least 50% of the Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide by April 6, 2015. The 50% completion status will indicate that West Coast Consulting has created the outline for the guide, selected all data and findings to be included within the guide, summarized all relevant findings, and have begun the recommendations section of the guide.

2.4FINAL EVALUATIONWest Coast Consulting will deliver a physical and electronic copy of the Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide on the date of the final presentation for 4kids1st.

ARTICLE 3: OBSTACLES AND CHALLENGES

The following are the obstacles and challenges that West Coast Consulting has faced to date:

1) Getting responses to conduct our interviews from other nonprofits.

2) Receiving a response for interview request from School of Law Special Education Advocacy Clinic.

3) Obtaining recent data on research being conducted.

4) Not having existing volunteers from 4kids1st to interview.

5) Inability to discuss partnership with Special Education Advocacy Clinic until after April 10, 2015.

6) Lack of academic research studies on usefulness of social media in acquiring volunteers.

ARTICLE 4: TIMELINE

4.1COMPLETE: Signed contract by February 4, 2015

4.2COMPLETE: Select non-profits for research by February 25, 2015

4.3COMPLETE: Schedule interviews with selected non-profits by March 2, 2015

4.4COMPLETE: Establish initial communication with Special Education Advocacy Clinic by March 5, 2015

4.5COMPLETE: Interim Report completed and signed by March 12, 2015

4.6IN PROGRESS: Submit first draft of Volunteer Acquisition and Management Guide for discussion by April 6, 2015

4.7IN PROGRESS: Complete interview with Cameron House by March 18, 2015

4.7IN PROGRESS: Schedule a meeting with Special Education Advocacy Clinic after April 10, 2015, to establish a partnership for volunteer acquisition

4.4Select Final Report Date _________________Thursday April 16, 2015Monday April 20, 2015Thursday April 23, 2015

ARTICLE 5: SIGNATURES

Your signature acknowledges agreement to the terms and conditions of this memorandum between West Coast Consulting and 4kids1st.

Kathy Greco(Date)Michael Swanner(Date)Executive Director and PresidentConsultant

Jessica Lee(Date)Antonia Buban(Date)ConsultantConsultant

Gershom Benitez(Date)Consultant

Appendix A: Selected Nonprofits

This appendix contains: the list of the selected (#) nonprofits for research and the website for each of the organizations.

1. Habitat for Humanity of Ventura Countyhttp://www.habitatventura.org/2. Healthy Child Healthy Worldhttp://healthychild.org/3. Cameron Househttp://www.cameronhouse.org/

Appendix B: Nonprofit Interviews

This appendix contains the questions we used to interview the selected nonprofits. Additionally, this appendix contains the answers from each nonprofit. Interview Questionnaire

1. How do you attract volunteers? Methods (social media, emails, flyers?)2. Specific criteria for volunteers? Training programs? If so, what does that look like?3. How do you give your volunteers a sense of fulfillment during their time?4. What is the follow-up with the volunteers? How do you get them to come back?

Responses from Interview with Tricia Keen: Habitat for Humanity of VenturaInterviewed March 2015

1. How do you attract volunteers? Methods (social media, emails, flyers?) Strong reputation of Habitat that it is well-founded. They know what they do. Reputation biggest selling point, then communicating through social media, emails, and a lot of partners (corporate, church, school groups, civic partners). Not much looking, they come to me. Can build houses, restore houses, work in restores, event planning, Habitat booth at community events, participate in committee work (which family is a good fit for the partnership) - lots of ways to contribute.

2. Specific criteria for volunteers? Training programs? If so, what does that look like? For new build site, for safety reasons have to be at least 16, have to be 18 to operate power equipment. A lot of on-the-job training. Crew leaders work with less skilled individuals and coach them in how to do something. Crew leaders divide group into teams to do different specific projects. Dividing it into smaller pieces like this gives them more fulfillment Volunteers looking for an engaging experience Meaningful Productive Fun AccomplishmentVolunteers are learning something new in the process

3. How do you give your volunteers a sense of fulfillment during their time?Purposes: 1) Youth groups like it to get community service hours. 2) Community involvement.3) Team Building. 4) Volunteers are working alongside the families who will get the house - this is a meaningful experience. 5) People who wouldnt normally get the chance to get to know each other are working side-by-side. 6) Making a contribution, people recognize how challenging it is to get affordable housing. 7) Definitely a community-building experience.

4. What is the follow-up with the volunteers? How do you get them to come back?People generally come back. Thanking volunteers is a huge component (on the day of as well as a follow-up email thanking them, send them photos of the project, link to a survey to get feedback)Post photos on Facebook. Volunteers often give financially as well -- become house sponsors. These people can come to the wall raising of the house.

Response from interview with Lindsey JeuDeVine: Healthy Child Healthy WorldInterviewed March 2015 1. How do you attract volunteers? Methods (social media, emails, flyers?)We have a large group of moms and healthy child supporters who always ask how they can help us out. We used to have kits that moms can order from our website that provides them with materials to have a healthy home party with other moms. This was our largest volunteer program. We dont really recruit on social media too often. But, we would if we needed to. We are mainly an online educational institution, so we have too wide of a following to use flyers/physical recruitment.

2. Specific criteria for volunteers? Training programs? If so, what does that look like?Our volunteers are already trainedbeing moms themselves. They are already interested/knowledgeable about our cause. They train themselves basically.

3. How do you give your volunteers a sense of fulfillment during their time?We would give them a gift bag of Healthy Child gear/products to take home with them. Or other gear from our trusted partners. Most of our volunteers do it for the cause of Healthy Childthats rewarding to them in itself.

4. What is the follow-up with the volunteers? How do you get them to come back?We make sure they have a wonderful experience and ensure they know how thankful we are for all they do. As state above, we send them thank you gifts for their time. I think this is a great way to get them to come back J We love our mom volunteers. We couldnt do what we do without them!

Appendix C: Research on Volunteer Acquisition

This appendix contains the sources and major themes from each journal article, book, or thesis paper in regards to volunteer acquisition.

1. Board Leaders Explore Volunteer Recruitment Strategies. (2003). Credit Union Directors Newsletter, 27(2), 2. Create a recruitment committee (might be unnecessary because of the size of 4kids1st) Setup education program and use peer reviews

2. Dwyer, P. C., et al. (2013). Sources Of Volunteer Motivation: Transformational Leadership And Personal Motives Influence Volunteer Outcomes. Nonprofit Management & Leadership, 24(2), 181-205. Volunteering in order to express humanitarian values and esteem enhancement predicted greater volunteer satisfaction Volunteers are more satisfied with their service when team leaders are inspirational, show concern about their development, involve them in decisions, and focus on the meaning of the work Organizations should cultivate transformational leaders and emphasize how volunteering benefits others and makes volunteers feel good about themselves Volunteering in order to gain an understanding predicted greater volunteer contribution

3. Ellis, S. J. (2002). The Volunteer Recruitment (and Membership Development) Book. Philadelphia, PA: Energize. Volunteer Job Descriptions Create a meaningful job description for volunteers If possible, continuous, ongoing volunteer assignments should be identified as wella s short-term projects Think of what both individuals and teams could do Explain what a volunteer could expect to receive as a result of their service A new understanding of cause, client group, or issue Training in a specific skill The opportunity to interact with different types of people New friends Volunteer Motives It builds self-esteem to be a partner in, rather than a recipient of, services Giving of oneself is a human need Being seen by others as a resource instead of as a charity case can be very important The most successful type of volunteering is an exchange - when the giver and the recipient both come away with something positive Why people dont volunteer No public transportation Work is too difficult (fear of failure) Your schedules dont match There are hidden financial costs Inviting, not pleading Send a message that the organization is worth your time and effort Want to offer people an opportunity to become involved that utilizes their talents and makes them feel like they are offering a real contribution When face-to-face recruiting, this implies that a persons talents and experience are wanted and needed; explain what makes this person a good candidate for the position Paint an upbeat picture of the work - volunteering should be fun! Ideas for 4kids1st Create opportunities for families to serve together Identify short-term projects (people prefer volunteer assignments that are short-term and and results-oriented in nature)

4. Murk, P. J., & Stephan, J. F. (1991). Volunteers: How To Get Them, Train Them And Keep Them. Economic Development Review, 9(3), 73. Twenty-nine (29%) percent volunteer because a family member or loved one was involved or participated in the project. Thirty-one (31%) percent volunteered because they belonged to a group which participated in a voluntary project. Only six (6%) percent volunteered due to a newspaper advertisement or media Volunteer Survey, conducted by The National Volunteer Center, revealed that the majority (97%) of people who volunteer do so because they want to help others, because they enjoy the work (93%), and because they are personally interested in the specific work or cause (89%) for which they volunteer their services. A smaller but still significant number of people volunteered as the result of a feeling of civic or social responsibility (76%), to fill free time (41%) or to make new friends (40%). It is interesting to note that while 59% reported volunteering because someone asked them to do so, only 14% of volunteer participation was due to encouragement by employers. The major reasons which respondents gave for not volunteering were lack of time (79%) and concern that they might be unable to honor the commitment (40%). These reasons correlate with another facet of the 1987 National Volunteer Center study in which 79% of nonvolunteers reported that short-term assignments would be the most important incentive to their participation. While only 8% of respondents were nonvolunteers because they felt they lacked the necessary skills, 70% reported that training was an important incentive for participation. This survey also suggested that volunteer involvement might be increased if programs provide daycare, transportation to the job, reimbursement for expenses, and activities in which volunteers can involve their families or friends. Recruitment of volunteers should be done with a major campaign to address the needs of the agency, the needs of the volunteer and the needs of the director. When recruiting volunteers it is helpful to present a job description to the applicant at the first meeting. Objectives should be specifically outlined as to the task, duration, duties, and meaning of the voluntary activity. When training volunteers, one should never assume that they know everything they will need to know about the agency. Everyone needs a good orientation or training program. In order to design a meaningful volunteer training program, three important questions should be raised: Questions to ask before getting volunteers What knowledge, skills, and abilities does a volunteer need to perform the assignment? Which of these requires further training and orientation? What kinds of skills does the program director or leader want this training session to produce? What are some manageable outcomes to be realized? What kinds of individual learning experiences can be produced in the training sessions that will give the volunteer the opportunity to practice and to develop those skills and perhaps reduce anxiety about the job? Use volunteers from previous years as trainers, coaches, and mentors for the new volunteers. Experienced volunteers can be excellent in role-playing situations because they have heard and handled many of the problems and responsibilities. These mentors can offer a great deal of credibility to a program or project -- they have been there before.

5. Shields, P. (2009). Young Adult Volunteers: Recruitment Appeals and Other Marketing Considerations. Journal Of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing, 21(2), 139-159. Young adults were found to be most inclined to volunteer for organizations that were either local and personal or nationally renowned. Organizations benefiting children were also highly regarded. The higher a college student's grade point average (GPA), the more likely they were to indicate an intention of volunteering in the future. New volunteers are demanding greater freedom of choice and contained assignments with tangible outcomes. In general, older volunteers are motivated by social responsibility while younger volunteers today are more interested in recognition Decisive research on why people volunteer discovered that volunteers were motivated by both altruistic and egoistic motives Benefits derived from volunteering have been found to be both psychological and social, and reasons for volunteering include that it provides opportunities to meet people and make friends and that the work is interesting This study found age to be the best criteria for selection of recruitment strategies. Numerous studies have consistently shown that if a volunteer identifies with a nonprofit, they exhibit higher levels of commitment and satisfaction with their involvement The success of a volunteer/nonprofit relationship hinges on the mutual satisfaction of both the volunteer's and the organization's needs Recognizing that factors influencing involvement in the volunteer sector change over time (Hibbert et al., 2003), recruitment strategies must constantly evolve. Overall, the most effective marketingoriented strategy for recruiting young adults today would incorporate the two basic and fundamental motivations of helping others, or altruism, and maintaining socially beneficial relationships or some sense of personal development.

6. Shye, S. (2010). The Motivation To Volunteer: A Systemic Quality Of Life Theory. Social Indicators Research, 98(2),183-200. It is well known that people of higher education, those of higher income and those who are more religious, are more likely to volunteer.

7. Varner Jr., A. F. (1983). What Motivates The Volunteer?. Nonprofit World Report, 1(2), 12-15. The exhilaration attendant to the completion of a volunteer task which, prior to being undertaken, may have been considered intimidating. By successfully completing the task, they are able to prove to themselves and others that they possess certain capabilities which they are not able to use or demonstrate in their daily work or non-volunteer situations. Many women use volunteering as a training ground or a stepping stone to paid jobs Use of those talents is a great help in cutting down expenses for the nonprofit organization, but there is an even more important benefit from the use of retired people as volunteers. Thats the boost to the morale of those still able and eager to work. The nonprofit organizations staff must do is to match the individual volunteers abilities, interests, and capabilities, as much as possible, with the job to be done. Some motivations of volunteers Looking for self expression (to exploit own talents) Wanting to become socially acceptable Expressing the need for praise or the esteem of others Desiring to develop talents as a means of upward progression Searching for a means to excel in something Voicing the need to demonstrate responsibility Needing the opportunity to participate in decision making One of the greatest motivators for a volunteer is that of recognition for the job being done. When possible, recognition should be given in a public setting. Whether its a formal presentation of a plaque, a handwritten note, or even a personalized form letter handed to the volunteer, the important thing is to let the volunteer know that his or her service is appreciated and to give public recognition of that appreciation.

Appendix D: Research on Volunteer Management

This appendix contains the sources and major themes from each journal article, book, or thesis paper in regards to volunteer management.

1. Rafe, S. C. (2013). Motivating Volunteers To Perform. Nonprofit World, 31(5), 18-19. The kind of volunteers a nonprofit organization needs are those who appreciate being needed, who have an opportunity to contribute to something they value, and who receive satisfaction from being able to make a difference. An important part of recruitment is acknowledgment. The volunteer steps forward, shows an interest, wants to know more, but then never hears another word as new priorities overtake the leaders agenda. In many cases, its quite appropriate to designate someone who will be following up with them. You dont have to do everything yourself. In fact, thats one of the shortcomings often found in leaders of volunteers. The next step is personal contact. The individual who makes the connection with the prospective volunteer should do so by phone or face-to-face, especially, dont sugar-coat the assignment. Be candid: If the job has some downsides, let the volunteer know about them dont keep volunteers in the same role for more than two years. They may grow stale or even become authoritarian or territorial about their role One of the quickest ways to lose volunteers is to plunge them into a task without providing adequate instruction or support. Ask. Listen. Act. Reinforce. Four key words in a leaders action vocabulary.

2. Stirling, C., Kilpatrick, S. and Orpin, P. (2011). A Psychological Contract Perspective to the Link between Non-profit Organizations' Management Practices and Volunteer Sustainability. Human Resource Development International, 14(3), 321-36. Formalization of the voluntary sector is impacting on volunteers experiences and may breach the psychological contract from the volunteers perspective. The transactional management practices of keeping formal records and not paying volunteers out of pocket expenses are negatively associated with volunteer recruitment and retention. Publicly recognizing volunteers through a volunteer newsletter supports volunteers relational expectations and is positively linked to adequate volunteer numbers. The relations between management practices and volunteers deserve closer examination as administrators of volunteers adopt more formalized practices with likely negative effects on volunteer sustainability Volunteers dislike formality and administrators respond by actively limiting the impact of formal management practices on volunteers Many volunteers expected less of a burden from paperwork, office politics and impersonal communications than paid staff. . . . I just want to help out, I dont want to be involved with management issues. I hated that and it was why I eventually left. The staff treated us too much like staff ... Some volunteers complained about the lack of information, and supportive guidelines coming from administrators

Appendix E: Research on Volunteer Retention

This appendix contains the sources and major themes from each journal article, book, or thesis paper in regards to volunteer retention.

1. Board Leaders Explore Volunteer Recruitment Strategies. (2003). Credit Union Directors Newsletter, 27(2), 2. Create a recruitment committee (might be unnecessary because of the size of 4kids1st) Setup education program and use peer reviews

2. Dwyer, P. C., et al. (2013). Sources Of Volunteer Motivation: Transformational Leadership And Personal Motives Influence Volunteer Outcomes. Nonprofit Management & Leadership, 24(2), 181-205. Volunteering in order to express humanitarian values and esteem enhancement predicted greater volunteer satisfaction Volunteers are more satisfied with their service when team leaders are inspirational, show concern about their development, involve them in decisions, and focus on the meaning of the work Organizations should cultivate transformational leaders and emphasize how volunteering benefits others and makes volunteers feel good about themselves Volunteering in order to gain an understanding predicted greater volunteer contribution

3. Ellis, S. J. (2002). The Volunteer Recruitment (and Membership Development) Book. Philadelphia, PA: Energize. Volunteer Job Descriptions Create a meaningful job description for volunteers If possible, continuous, ongoing volunteer assignments should be identified as wella s short-term projects Think of what both individuals and teams could do Explain what a volunteer could expect to receive as a result of their service A new understanding of cause, client group, or issue Training in a specific skill The opportunity to interact with different types of people New friends Volunteer Motives It builds self-esteem to be a partner in, rather than a recipient of, services Giving of oneself is a human need Being seen by others as a resource instead of as a charity case can be very important The most successful type of volunteering is an exchange - when the giver and the recipient both come away with something positive Why people dont volunteer No public transportation Work is too difficult (fear of failure) Your schedules dont match There are hidden financial costs Inviting, not pleading Send a message that the organization is worth your time and effort Want to offer people an opportunity to become involved that utilizes their talents and makes them feel like they are offering a real contribution When face-to-face recruiting, this implies that a persons talents and experience are wanted and needed; explain what makes this person a good candidate for the position Paint an upbeat picture of the work - volunteering should be fun! Ideas for 4kids1st Create opportunities for families to serve together Identify short-term projects (people prefer volunteer assignments that are short-term and and results-oriented in nature)

4. Murk, P. J., & Stephan, J. F. (1991). Volunteers: How To Get Them, Train Them And Keep Them. Economic Development Review, 9(3), 73. Twenty-nine (29%) percent volunteer because a family member or loved one was involved or participated in the project. Thirty-one (31%) percent volunteered because they belonged to a group which participated in a voluntary project. Only six (6%) percent volunteered due to a newspaper advertisement or media Volunteer Survey, conducted by The National Volunteer Center, revealed that the majority (97%) of people who volunteer do so because they want to help others, because they enjoy the work (93%), and because they are personally interested in the specific work or cause (89%) for which they volunteer their services. A smaller but still significant number of people volunteered as the result of a feeling of civic or social responsibility (76%), to fill free time (41%) or to make new friends (40%). It is interesting to note that while 59% reported volunteering because someone asked them to do so, only 14% of volunteer participation was due to encouragement by employers. The major reasons which respondents gave for not volunteering were lack of time (79%) and concern that they might be unable to honor the commitment (40%). These reasons correlate with another facet of the 1987 National Volunteer Center study in which 79% of nonvolunteers reported that short-term assignments would be the most important incentive to their participation. While only 8% of respondents were nonvolunteers because they felt they lacked the necessary skills, 70% reported that training was an important incentive for participation. This survey also suggested that volunteer involvement might be increased if programs provide daycare, transportation to the job, reimbursement for expenses, and activities in which volunteers can involve their families or friends. Recruitment of volunteers should be done with a major campaign to address the needs of the agency, the needs of the volunteer and the needs of the director. When recruiting volunteers it is helpful to present a job description to the applicant at the first meeting. Objectives should be specifically outlined as to the task, duration, duties, and meaning of the voluntary activity. When training volunteers, one should never assume that they know everything they will need to know about the agency. Everyone needs a good orientation or training program. In order to design a meaningful volunteer training program, three important questions should be raised: Questions to ask before getting volunteers What knowledge, skills, and abilities does a volunteer need to perform the assignment? Which of these requires further training and orientation? What kinds of skills does the program director or leader want this training session to produce? What are some manageable outcomes to be realized? What kinds of individual learning experiences can be produced in the training sessions that will give the volunteer the opportunity to practice and to develop those skills and perhaps reduce anxiety about the job? Use volunteers from previous years as trainers, coaches, and mentors for the new volunteers. Experienced volunteers can be excellent in role-playing situations because they have heard and handled many of the problems and responsibilities. These mentors can offer a great deal of credibility to a program or project -- they have been there before.

5. Shields, P. (2009). Young Adult Volunteers: Recruitment Appeals and Other Marketing Considerations. Journal Of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing, 21(2), 139-159. Young adults were found to be most inclined to volunteer for organizations that were either local and personal or nationally renowned. Organizations benefiting children were also highly regarded. The higher a college student's grade point average (GPA), the more likely they were to indicate an intention of volunteering in the future. New volunteers are demanding greater freedom of choice and contained assignments with tangible outcomes. In general, older volunteers are motivated by social responsibility while younger volunteers today are more interested in recognition Decisive research on why people volunteer discovered that volunteers were motivated by both altruistic and egoistic motives Benefits derived from volunteering have been found to be both psychological and social, and reasons for volunteering include that it provides opportunities to meet people and make friends and that the work is interesting This study found age to be the best criteria for selection of recruitment strategies. Numerous studies have consistently shown that if a volunteer identifies with a nonprofit, they exhibit higher levels of commitment and satisfaction with their involvement The success of a volunteer/nonprofit relationship hinges on the mutual satisfaction of both the volunteer's and the organization's needs Recognizing that factors influencing involvement in the volunteer sector change over time (Hibbert et al., 2003), recruitment strategies must constantly evolve. Overall, the most effective marketingoriented strategy for recruiting young adults today would incorporate the two basic and fundamental motivations of helping others, or altruism, and maintaining socially beneficial relationships or some sense of personal development.

6. Shye, S. (2010). The Motivation To Volunteer: A Systemic Quality Of Life Theory. Social Indicators Research, 98(2),183-200. It is well known that people of higher education, those of higher income and those who are more religious, are more likely to volunteer.

7. Varner Jr., A. F. (1983). What Motivates The Volunteer?. Nonprofit World Report, 1(2), 12-15. The exhilaration attendant to the completion of a volunteer task which, prior to being undertaken, may have been considered intimidating. By successfully completing the task, they are able to prove to themselves and others that they possess certain capabilities which they are not able to use or demonstrate in their daily work or non-volunteer situations. Many women use volunteering as a training ground or a stepping stone to paid jobs Use of those talents is a great help in cutting down expenses for the nonprofit organization, but there is an even more important benefit from the use of retired people as volunteers. Thats the boost to the morale of those still able and eager to work. The nonprofit organizations staff must do is to match the individual volunteers abilities, interests, and capabilities, as much as possible, with the job to be done. Some motivations of volunteers Looking for self expression (to exploit own talents) Wanting to become socially acceptable Expressing the need for praise or the esteem of others Desiring to develop talents as a means of upward progression Searching for a means to excel in something Voicing the need to demonstrate responsibility Needing the opportunity to participate in decision making One of the greatest motivators for a volunteer is that of recognition for the job being done. When possible, recognition should be given in a public setting. Whether its a formal presentation of a plaque, a handwritten note, or even a personalized form letter handed to the volunteer, the important thing is to let the volunteer know that his or her service is appreciated and to give public recognition of that appreciation.

Appendix F: Service Leadership Focus Group Feedback

Potential partnerships that may serve as future resources for both interns and volunteers:

Universities LMU USC CSUs Biola (Anaheim) Cal Lutheran

Churches Calvary Community Church (Thousand Oaks) Reality LA Church

Other School on Wheels Volunteermatch.org and other online outlets Legal secretary programs Experience Corps, Bay Area (Ask for Alexis Hawkins) Chamber of Commerce for Westlake Hospitals/clinics

Forms of Advertising:

Social media presence Facebook Instagram Twitter Google+Other Blogs Online newsletters Posting flyers at coffee shops, local businesses, schools, local government offices Magazines, newspapers

What makes a volunteer experience successful? Hands on experience Making a difference; not doing mere "busy work" Organized structure Flexibility and transparency4KIDS1ST Volunteer SATISFACTION SURVEYName:

Age:

Volunteer Position:

For each item identified below, circle the number to the right that best fits your judgment of its quality. Use the rating scale to select the quality number.Survey ItemScale

Strongly disagreeDisagreeNeutralAgreeStrongly Agree

Overall, I am satisfied as a volunteer of 4kids1st12345

4kids1st cares about its volunteers12345

My volunteer supervisor is easy to get ahold of when I have questions.12345

My volunteer supervisor shows appreciation for the work that I do12345

My volunteer job description accurately reflects what I am asked to do12345

I have received the training I need to perform my volunteer duties12345

I feel I am a part of a team helping to fulfill the mission of 4kids1st12345

Managers help volunteers who have areas that are in need of improvement12345

I am provided opportunities for growth in my volunteer role12345

My volunteer supervisor helps me understand the mission of 4kids1st12345

I intend to continue volunteering at 4kids1st12345

I will recommend others to volunteer at 4kids1st12345

If you rated one of these items 3 or lower, please provide comments on how these can be improved:

Additional Comments

4KIDS1ST CLIENT SATISFACTION SurveyName:

Name of Parent Mentor:

For each item identified below, circle the number to the right that best fits your judgment of its quality. Use the rating scale to select the quality number.Survey ItemScale

STRONGLY DISAGREEDISAGREENEUTRALAGREESTRONGLY AGREE

My mentor is approachable and trustworthy12345

My mentor is available when I need him/her 12345

My mentor is knowledgeable and able to answer my questions12345

I feel like my mentor understands and cares about my situation12345

I feel supported by my mentor12345

I wish I had someone else to help me during this process12345

I feel like I have a good understanding of the IEP process 12345

I feel like my child is being taken care of by 4kids1st12345

My stress and anxiety levels are much lower than when I began the IEP process12345

I feel confident about the future of my child and his/her education12345

I sometimes feel like I am fighting for my child alone12345

It is comforting to know that my mentor is someone I can always contact if I need help or support12345

If you rated one of these items 3 or lower, please provide feedback on how this area can be improved:

Additional comments:

List of Potential PartnershipsUniversities Pepperdine University Career Center Special Education Advocacy Clinic LMU USC CSUs Biola (Anaheim) Cal Lutheran

Churches Calvary Community Church (Thousand Oaks) Reality LA Church

Other School on Wheels Volunteermatch.org and other online outlets Legal secretary programs Experience Corps, Bay Area Contact Alexis Hawkins Chamber of Commerce for Westlake Hospitals/clinics

Parent Mentor Job Description

Outline of volunteers responsibilities or list of tasks Parent Mentor will act as parent support in directing next steps for parent and educate parents on IEP process Timeline for a new Parent Mentor July: Volunteer Orientation and Family Placement Week 1: orientation and training for volunteers Week 2: Parent Mentor has initial intake conversation with potential client; following this conversation, Parent Mentor to meet in person or by phone with 4kids1st representative to discuss Potential Clients situation Week 3: Parent Mentor to review client intake application and draft a brief synopsis for review by 4kids1st representative August-June: School Year Mentor to attend monthly ongoing training for Parent Mentors and Volunteers Mentor to attend monthly meeting with parent and 4kids1st staff (to take place the first Wednesday of every month) Mentor to attend school board and IEP meetings with parents as needed, followed by a follow-up meeting with 4kids1st representative Mentor to communicate with parents, offer support, and answer questions as needed

Outcomes/goals Parents will send a progress and satisfaction report to 4kids1st (we recommend once a month) unless having problems with mentor (will be more frequent) As a result of this program... Parents will feel supported and have their needs met by mentor Parents will better understand policies relating to their childs education Parents will have a personal mentor who can answer questions

Training and support Until further notice, Kathy Greco will be the supervisor and contact point for parent mentors and volunteer law students Once accepted, volunteers will attend consulting meeting with Kathy until trained and updated on all information regarding their client Together, Kathy and volunteer will create an action plan for clients next steps Once a month, parent mentors and law student volunteers will meet with Kathy or other 4kids1st representative Open forum for discussion Progress reports Troubleshooting

Time commitment Year-long commitment, beginning with training in July and ending with the end of the school year in June

Qualifications needed Parent has navigated the school system previously and is knowledgeable about IEP process Parent is passionate about helping others Parent has ___ hours/week available to work with family and attend meetings Parent must pass background check

Disqualifications Abuse of illegal drugs and/or alcohol Failure to pass background check

Benefits Parent Mentor will be able to use their experience and/or expertise to contribute to the life of an autistic child and support his or her family Stipends may be allocated as needed for transportation costs