UI / UX Engineering for Web Applications

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* Differences between Websites and Web Applications * Research Techniques for Knowing Your Users * Task Analysis * UI/UX Design Principles for Web Applications

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1. UI/UX Engineering for Web Applications Reggie Santos UP ITDC 2. Outline Difference between Websites and Web Applications Research Techniques for Knowing Your Users Task Analysis UI/UX Design Principles for Web Applications References Difference between Websites and Web Applications Research Techniques for Knowing Your Users Task Analysis UI/UX Design Principles for Web Applications References 3. Difference between Websites and Web Applications Website Collection of pages consisting mostly of static content, images and video, with limited interactive functionality (i.e. except for the contact form and search functionality) Primary role is to inform Website Collection of pages consisting mostly of static content, images and video, with limited interactive functionality (i.e. except for the contact form and search functionality) Primary role is to inform 4. Difference between Websites and Web Applications 5. Difference between Websites and Web Applications Web applications Dynamic, interactive systems that help businesses perform business critical tasks and that increase and measure their productivity Primary role is to perform a function that serves the user's tasks and according to defined business rules Web applications Dynamic, interactive systems that help businesses perform business critical tasks and that increase and measure their productivity Primary role is to perform a function that serves the user's tasks and according to defined business rules 6. Difference between Websites and Web Applications 7. Web Application Type: Open Open Online applications that are easily accessible to anyone who opens an account (either for free or by paying a fee) Open Online applications that are easily accessible to anyone who opens an account (either for free or by paying a fee) 8. Web Application Type: Open 9. Web Application Type: Closed Closed/line-of-business Usually not accessible outside the company that uses it, and they can be considered "offline" applications (though many systems expose their functionality to business partners via either services or specialized interfaces) Usually run on the company's local network and are available only to employees Closed/line-of-business Usually not accessible outside the company that uses it, and they can be considered "offline" applications (though many systems expose their functionality to business partners via either services or specialized interfaces) Usually run on the company's local network and are available only to employees 10. Web Application Type: Closed 11. Research Techniques for Knowing Your Users 12. Research Techniques for Knowing Your Users User Interviews Guided conversations with existing or potential users to help you understand their preferences and attitude Contextual Inquiry Combining direct user observation with an interview that takes place in the users environment in order to better understand their work environment, the problems they are trying to solve and other related preferences User Interviews Guided conversations with existing or potential users to help you understand their preferences and attitude Contextual Inquiry Combining direct user observation with an interview that takes place in the users environment in order to better understand their work environment, the problems they are trying to solve and other related preferences 13. Research Techniques for Knowing Your Users Surveys A clear set of questions distributed to a wider audience in order to gather results that can help validate existing data and personas Card sorting A grouping task for individuals or small groups used to establish common patterns and identify areas of confusion Surveys A clear set of questions distributed to a wider audience in order to gather results that can help validate existing data and personas Card sorting A grouping task for individuals or small groups used to establish common patterns and identify areas of confusion 14. Research Techniques for Knowing Your Users Usability testing The process of performing a series of specific tests on a site or a product to reveal potential usability problems and identify solutions to address them Usability testing The process of performing a series of specific tests on a site or a product to reveal potential usability problems and identify solutions to address them 15. Task Analysis The process of learning about ordinary users by observing them in action to understand in detail how they perform their tasks and achieve their intended goals Help identify the tasks that your website and applications must support and can also help you refine or re-define your site's navigation or search by determining the appropriate content scope The process of learning about ordinary users by observing them in action to understand in detail how they perform their tasks and achieve their intended goals Help identify the tasks that your website and applications must support and can also help you refine or re-define your site's navigation or search by determining the appropriate content scope 16. Task Analysis 17. Task Analysis Helps you understand: What your users' goals are; what they are trying to achieve What users actually do to achieve those goals What experiences (personal, social, and cultural) users bring to the tasks Helps you understand: What your users' goals are; what they are trying to achieve What users actually do to achieve those goals What experiences (personal, social, and cultural) users bring to the tasks 18. Task Analysis Helps you understand: How users are influenced by their physical environment How users' previous knowledge and experience influence: How they think about their work The workflow they follow to perform their tasks Helps you understand: How users are influenced by their physical environment How users' previous knowledge and experience influence: How they think about their work The workflow they follow to perform their tasks 19. Design Principles Usability Affordance Intuitiveness Responsiveness Forgiveness Usability Affordance Intuitiveness Responsiveness Forgiveness 20. Design Principles Consistency Familiarity Efficiency Accessibility Simplicity Aesthetics Consistency Familiarity Efficiency Accessibility Simplicity Aesthetics 21. Design Principle: Usability Facts about human vision and seeing We have sharp vision in the center of our focus that is good at paying attention and identifying detail We have poor peripheral vision that can identify movement and contrast, but not identify detail Facts about human vision and seeing We have sharp vision in the center of our focus that is good at paying attention and identifying detail We have poor peripheral vision that can identify movement and contrast, but not identify detail 22. Design Principle: Usability Facts about human vision and seeing Shadows help us perceive information in three dimensions light from above and shadow below makes things pop out of the page Sudden movement, changes in contrast and the appearance of images can attract visual attention Facts about human vision and seeing Shadows help us perceive information in three dimensions light from above and shadow below makes things pop out of the page Sudden movement, changes in contrast and the appearance of images can attract visual attention 23. Design Principle: Usability Checklist for choosing components Is there enough contrast and spacing for a user to really see the component? Do changes happen right where the user is looking? If changes happen outside the field of vision, is there something that will attract visual attention (movement or color) so they see the change? And does the change persist long enough to be spotted? Checklist for choosing components Is there enough contrast and spacing for a user to really see the component? Do changes happen right where the user is looking? If changes happen outside the field of vision, is there something that will attract visual attention (movement or color) so they see the change? And does the change persist long enough to be spotted? 24. Design Principle: Usability 25. Design Principle: Usability 26. Design Principle: Affordance Attribute of an item that communicates what can be done with it When effective, users should be able to figure out what to do with an item just by looking at it Shadows and highlights can make buttons pop, sliders look like they can be slid and dials look like they can be turned Attribute of an item that communicates what can be done with it When effective, users should be able to figure out what to do with an item just by looking at it Shadows and highlights can make buttons pop, sliders look like they can be slid and dials look like they can be turned 27. Design Principle: Affordance 28. Design Principle: Intuitiveness About learned behavior and can be considered synonymous with the phrase "easy to learn" Things that are easy to learn build on existing knowledge Usable components People can figure out how to operate just by looking at its visual representation Builds on existing knowledge by using existing conventions About learned behavior and can be considered synonymous with the phrase "easy to learn" Things that are easy to learn build on existing knowledge Usable components People can figure out how to operate just by looking at its visual representation Builds on existing knowledge by using existing conventions 29. Design Principle: Intuitiveness 30. Design Principle: Intuitiveness 31. Design Principle: Intuitiveness 32. Design Principle: Responsiveness Feedback and error recovery Users should be informed about (potential) errors and how they can affect their work Also contains actions which users can perform in order to recover from the error Some mistakes are irreversible so it is important to suggest solutions to help remedy problems Feedback and error recovery Users should be informed about (potential) errors and how they can affect their work Also contains actions which users can perform in order to recover from the error Some mistakes are irreversible so it is important to suggest solutions to help remedy problems 33. Design Principle: Responsiveness - Fast The interface, if not the software behind it, should work fast Seeing things load quickly, or at the very least, an interface that loads quickly (even if the content is yet to catch up) improves the user experience The interface, if not the software behind it, should work fast Seeing things load quickly, or at the very least, an interface that loads quickly (even if the content is yet to catch up) improves the user experience 34. Design Principle: Responsiveness - Feedback Must be plainly visible, and must happen where the user is looking Can take many forms, including (but not limited to): Buttons that appear to depress on click Waiting indicators for processes that take time Search results that appear as they are found (rather than after a delay) Confirmation messages that appear after actions Must be plainly visible, and must happen where the user is looking Can take many forms, including (but not limited to): Buttons that appear to depress on click Waiting indicators for processes that take time Search results that appear as they are found (rather than after a delay) Confirmation messages that appear after actions 35. Design Principle: Responsiveness - Feedback 36. Design Principle: Responsiveness - Feedback 37. Design Principle: Responsiveness - Feedback 38. Design Principle: Responsiveness - Feedback 39. Design Principle: Responsiveness - Errors Avoid: Users need to be able to avoid errors Many errors can be avoided by a good task flow, layout and labeling Identify: If an error does occur, users need to be able to quickly see that something happened and understand what to do about it Correct: Users need to be able to quickly correct an error and be able to move forward right away Avoid: Users need to be able to avoid errors Many errors can be avoided by a good task flow, layout and labeling Identify: If an error does occur, users need to be able to quickly see that something happened and understand what to do about it Correct: Users need to be able to quickly correct an error and be able to move forward right away 40. Design Principle: Responsiveness - Errors Choosing the right components is a very big factor in error management A combo box (combination of single-select list and text entry box) reduces the error to a much greater extent than just a text entry field Giving the user an initial set of options, simple data entry and formatting errors can be avoided Date pickers reduce the margin of error compared to date text entry fields Auto-complete helps people select from long lists Choosing the right components is a very big factor in error management A combo box (combination of single-select list and text entry box) reduces the error to a much greater extent than just a text entry field Giving the user an initial set of options, simple data entry and formatting errors can be avoided Date pickers reduce the margin of error compared to date text entry fields Auto-complete helps people select from long lists 41. Design Principle: Responsiveness - Errors 42. Design Principle: Responsiveness - Errors 43. Design Principle: Responsiveness - Errors 44. Design Principle: Responsiveness - Errors 45. Design Principle: Responsiveness Web form validation Ensure that the user provided necessary and properly formatted information needed to successfully complete an operation Validation methods Server-side validation Client-side validation Web form validation Ensure that the user provided necessary and properly formatted information needed to successfully complete an operation Validation methods Server-side validation Client-side validation 46. Design Principle: Responsiveness 47. Design Principle: Responsiveness Server-side validation Information is being sent to the server and validated using one of the server-side programming languages If the validation fails, the response is then sent back to the client, the page that contains the web form is refreshed and feedback is shown Server-side validation Information is being sent to the server and validated using one of the server-side programming languages If the validation fails, the response is then sent back to the client, the page that contains the web form is refreshed and feedback is shown 48. Design Principle: Responsiveness Server-side validation Pros Secure because it will work even if JavaScript is turned off in the browser and it cannot be easily bypassed by malicious users Server-side validation Pros Secure because it will work even if JavaScript is turned off in the browser and it cannot be easily bypassed by malicious users 49. Design Principle: Responsiveness Server-side validation Cons Users will have to fill in the information without getting a response until they submit the form, resulting in a slow response from the server Except validation through AJAX Ajax calls to the server can validate as you type and provide immediate feedback Server-side validation Cons Users will have to fill in the information without getting a response until they submit the form, resulting in a slow response from the server Except validation through AJAX Ajax calls to the server can validate as you type and provide immediate feedback 50. Design Principle: Responsiveness Client-side validation Pros Form never gets submitted if validation fails Immediate feedback if validation fails Cons Relies on JavaScript Can be bypassed if users turn JavaScript is off Why validation should always be implemented both the client and server Client-side validation Pros Form never gets submitted if validation fails Immediate feedback if validation fails Cons Relies on JavaScript Can be bypassed if users turn JavaScript is off Why validation should always be implemented both the client and server 51. Design Principle: Responsiveness Client-side validation Cons Validation is done on the client using script languages such as JavaScript User's input can be validated as they type more responsive, visually rich validation Client-side validation Cons Validation is done on the client using script languages such as JavaScript User's input can be validated as they type more responsive, visually rich validation 52. Design Principle: Responsiveness 53. Design Principle: Responsiveness 54. Design Principle: Responsiveness What to validate Required information Information without which operation cannot be completed successfully Validation has to ensure that the user provided all the necessary details in the web form and it has to fail if at least one of the fields is not provided What to validate Required information Information without which operation cannot be completed successfully Validation has to ensure that the user provided all the necessary details in the web form and it has to fail if at least one of the fields is not provided 55. Design Principle: Responsiveness 56. Design Principle: Responsiveness Required information According to smashingmagazine's survey, designers tend to remove all unnecessary details and distractions which do not help the user complete the form Required information According to smashingmagazine's survey, designers tend to remove all unnecessary details and distractions which do not help the user complete the form 57. Design Principle: Responsiveness Correct format Applies to various cases such as email address, URL, dates, phone numbers, and others If the information is not in the correct format, users should be informed and correct format should be suggested Correct format Applies to various cases such as email address, URL, dates, phone numbers, and others If the information is not in the correct format, users should be informed and correct format should be suggested 58. Design Principle: Responsiveness 59. Design Principle: Responsiveness Confirmation fields When dealing with data that is important to the system, it is a good practice to let the users confirm their input using additional confirmation fields This way users can be certain that they provided correct information e.g. passwords, email addresses Confirmation fields When dealing with data that is important to the system, it is a good practice to let the users confirm their input using additional confirmation fields This way users can be certain that they provided correct information e.g. passwords, email addresses 60. Design Principle: Responsiveness 61. Design Principle: Responsiveness Confirmation fields According to a survey, email confirmation was mandatory in only 18% of websites, while password confirmation was mandatory in 72% of websites Surprisingly, large websites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Stumbleupon and Twitter do not require password confirmation Confirmation fields According to a survey, email confirmation was mandatory in only 18% of websites, while password confirmation was mandatory in 72% of websites Surprisingly, large websites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Stumbleupon and Twitter do not require password confirmation 62. Design Principle: Responsiveness Validation feedback If validation fails, the system should let the users know it by providing a clear and unambiguous message (usually one or two sentences) and ways to correct the errors Validation feedback If validation fails, the system should let the users know it by providing a clear and unambiguous message (usually one or two sentences) and ways to correct the errors 63. Design Principle: Responsiveness 64. Design Principle: Responsiveness What to Avoid Single error pages Feedback messages in popup windows What to Avoid Single error pages Feedback messages in popup windows 65. Design Principle: Responsiveness Rules of Thumb in Web Form Validation Design Never omit server-side validation Do not provide confusing validation feedback. It should clearly communicate the errors and ways to fix them. Do not let users think about what information is required, always clearly mark required fields Never provide validation feedback on a single page or in a popup alert Rules of Thumb in Web Form Validation Design Never omit server-side validation Do not provide confusing validation feedback. It should clearly communicate the errors and ways to fix them. Do not let users think about what information is required, always clearly mark required fields Never provide validation feedback on a single page or in a popup alert 66. Design Principle: Responsiveness Rules of Thumb in Web Form Validation Design Do not use dynamic effects as a compensation for a badly designed form. Fancy effects would not hide a poorly designed web form. If you use Captcha, do not forget to provide audio support and enable users to "reload" the Captcha Do not forget to inform users when the form was completed successfully. It is as important as a good validation feedback. Rules of Thumb in Web Form Validation Design Do not use dynamic effects as a compensation for a badly designed form. Fancy effects would not hide a poorly designed web form. If you use Captcha, do not forget to provide audio support and enable users to "reload" the Captcha Do not forget to inform users when the form was completed successfully. It is as important as a good validation feedback. 67. Design Principle: Forgiveness Allow users to recover from errors, or even better to prevent errors Allow users to recover from errors, or even better to prevent errors 68. Design Principle: Forgiveness 69. Design Principle: Forgiveness 70. Design Principle: Forgiveness 71. Design Principle: Forgiveness 72. Design Principle: Forgiveness 73. Design Principle: Forgiveness 74. Design Principle: Consistency "A foolish consistency is the bugbear of small minds" Ralph Waldo Emerson "A foolish consistency is the bugbear of small minds" Ralph Waldo Emerson 75. Design Principle: Consistency - Internal Standards and conventions should be established and applied throughout all the content e.g. navigation, color, terminology e.g. a user who encounters the "Search" at the top right on one page will have problems if it is arbitrarily moved to different locations on other pages of the site Standards and conventions should be established and applied throughout all the content e.g. navigation, color, terminology e.g. a user who encounters the "Search" at the top right on one page will have problems if it is arbitrarily moved to different locations on other pages of the site 76. Design Principle: Consistency - Internal 77. Design Principle: Consistency - External context within a group or family consistent with general practice users will tend to apply rules they have learned elsewhere, even if those rules do not actually apply to the current site e.g. Google apps/services context within a group or family consistent with general practice users will tend to apply rules they have learned elsewhere, even if those rules do not actually apply to the current site e.g. Google apps/services 78. Design Principle: Consistency - External 79. Design Principle: Consistency Makes business sense Allows developers to develop a small set of templates for pages and other design elements, and apply them throughout the site Makes writing, publishing and maintenance easier, and supports the implementation of XML, CSS and other technologies that rely on structured content Makes business sense Allows developers to develop a small set of templates for pages and other design elements, and apply them throughout the site Makes writing, publishing and maintenance easier, and supports the implementation of XML, CSS and other technologies that rely on structured content 80. Design Principle: Consistency - Language Terminologies "Voice" e.g. warm and friendly, legalistic Makes your site appear simpler and more authoritative Terminologies "Voice" e.g. warm and friendly, legalistic Makes your site appear simpler and more authoritative 81. Design Principle: Consistency UI Elements Apply them as they are originally defined e.g. option buttons (radio buttons) only for mutually-exclusive items e.g. check boxes if the user can choose one or more options Apply them as they are originally defined e.g. option buttons (radio buttons) only for mutually-exclusive items e.g. check boxes if the user can choose one or more options 82. Design Principle: Consistency UI Elements Graphic treatment e.g. options should be round e.g. check boxes should be square e.g. editable fields should have white backgrounds e.g. non-editable fields should be gray Graphic treatment e.g. options should be round e.g. check boxes should be square e.g. editable fields should have white backgrounds e.g. non-editable fields should be gray 83. Design Principle: Consistency Layout Well-established conventions the company logo should appear at the top left of the page with the associated homepage link navigation on the top or left (or both) breadcrumbs (if used) below the primary navigation Well-established conventions the company logo should appear at the top left of the page with the associated homepage link navigation on the top or left (or both) breadcrumbs (if used) below the primary navigation 84. Design Principle: Consistency Layout Well-established conventions Content in the center of the page Related material and promotions on the right Search on the top right (although there are many exceptions to this) Well-established conventions Content in the center of the page Related material and promotions on the right Search on the top right (although there are many exceptions to this) 85. Design Principle: Consistency Functions a public transport website might be expected to offer timetables, fare information, and a trip planner a cinema website may be expected to offer a ticket-booking system. If the site cannot provide this, at least provide information on equivalent functions (such as a phone number for bookings) a public transport website might be expected to offer timetables, fare information, and a trip planner a cinema website may be expected to offer a ticket-booking system. If the site cannot provide this, at least provide information on equivalent functions (such as a phone number for bookings) 86. Design Principle: Consistency Functions 87. Design Principle: Consistency Visual Treatment As the user moves through your site, the visual treatment provides reassurance that they are still in the same place, and gives an overall impression of professionalism and reliability Applies not only to the obvious elements like logos and navigation, but also to content elements, fonts and backgrounds As the user moves through your site, the visual treatment provides reassurance that they are still in the same place, and gives an overall impression of professionalism and reliability Applies not only to the obvious elements like logos and navigation, but also to content elements, fonts and backgrounds 88. Design Principle: Consistency Visual Treatment 89. Design Principle: Consistency Tip: Define user interface guidelines for each project or for a group of projects Tip: Define user interface guidelines for each project or for a group of projects 90. Design Principle: Familiarity Draw on concepts from the users' previous experiences and use appropriate metaphors Draw on concepts from the users' previous experiences and use appropriate metaphors 91. Design Principle: Familiarity 92. Design Principle: Efficiency Focus users on completing tasks in the easiest and fastest way Provide keyboard support and shortcuts Personalization Focus users on completing tasks in the easiest and fastest way Provide keyboard support and shortcuts Personalization 93. Design Principle: Efficiency 94. Design Principle: Efficiency Focus users on completing tasks in the easiest and fastest way Provide keyboard support and shortcuts Personalization Focus users on completing tasks in the easiest and fastest way Provide keyboard support and shortcuts Personalization 95. Design Principle: Efficiency 96. Design Principle: Accessibility more than just providing the necessary features to support the technologies used by people with a disability, such as visual impairment, motor disabilities or intellectual disabilities also about supporting older people (with variable font size), people in rural locations (with a light page weight) or people with colour blindness (by not using colour alone as a highlight) more than just providing the necessary features to support the technologies used by people with a disability, such as visual impairment, motor disabilities or intellectual disabilities also about supporting older people (with variable font size), people in rural locations (with a light page weight) or people with colour blindness (by not using colour alone as a highlight) 97. Design Principle: Accessibility assistive/adaptive technologies: built-in customizing options (such as changes to font sizes and styles, changes to mouse appearance and operation, changes to keyboard operation, changes to the operation of warnings and notifications) simple built-in aids (such as magnification or read aloud options) assistive/adaptive technologies: built-in customizing options (such as changes to font sizes and styles, changes to mouse appearance and operation, changes to keyboard operation, changes to the operation of warnings and notifications) simple built-in aids (such as magnification or read aloud options) 98. Design Principle: Accessibility all functions must work using a keyboard as well as a mouse (including scripts, hovers, onmouseovers, etc.) content must make sense when rendered linearly assistive technology works with the code, so that the underlying code must make sense, not just the visual presentation non-text elements (images, multimedia, etc.) must have text equivalents structure must be created with code not visual presentation (e.g. headings, lists, tables, forms) all functions must work using a keyboard as well as a mouse (including scripts, hovers, onmouseovers, etc.) content must make sense when rendered linearly assistive technology works with the code, so that the underlying code must make sense, not just the visual presentation non-text elements (images, multimedia, etc.) must have text equivalents structure must be created with code not visual presentation (e.g. headings, lists, tables, forms) 99. Design Principle: Accessibility 100. Design Principle: Accessibility 101. Design Principle: Simplicity "The simplest way to achieve simplicity is through thoughtful reduction" John Maeda, The Laws of Simplicity "The simplest way to achieve simplicity is through thoughtful reduction" John Maeda, The Laws of Simplicity 102. Design Principle: Simplicity Quality of being natural, plain and easy to understand Most people naturally dislike complexity in devices and software Quality of being natural, plain and easy to understand Most people naturally dislike complexity in devices and software 103. Design Principle: Simplicity 104. Design Principle: Simplicity Modal Windows 105. Design Principle: Simplicity Hover Controls 106. Design Principle: Simplicity Controls on Demand 107. Design Principle: Simplicity Expanding Forms 108. Design Principle: Simplicity Labels inside Input Forms 109. Design Principle: Simplicity Icons instead of Text 110. Design Principle: Simplicity Context- based Controls 111. Design Principle: Simplicity - Restraint Quality of holding yourself back and implementing something which solves the problem in the simplest way possible Giving your work an identity certainly does not mean you are losing restraint but it may lead you down the road of implementing too many design elements for the sake of design elements Instead, apply your identity to the core elements Quality of holding yourself back and implementing something which solves the problem in the simplest way possible Giving your work an identity certainly does not mean you are losing restraint but it may lead you down the road of implementing too many design elements for the sake of design elements Instead, apply your identity to the core elements 112. Design Principle: Simplicity - Restraint 113. Design Principle: Simplicity - Restraint 114. Design Principle: Simplicity - Restraint 115. Design Principle: Simplicity - Restraint 116. Design Principle: Simplicity - Restraint 117. Design Principle: Simplicity - Restraint 118. Design Principle: Simplicity - Restraint 119. Design Principle: Aesthetics The science of how things are known via the senses Examines our affective domain response to an object or phenomenon The science of how things are known via the senses Examines our affective domain response to an object or phenomenon 120. Design Principle: Aesthetics - Affect 121. Design Principle: Aesthetics - Affect "... emotion is not a luxury: it is an expression of basic mechanisms of life regulation developed in evolution, and is indispensable for survival. It plays a critical role in virtually all aspects of learning, reasoning and creativity. Somewhat surprisingly, it may play a role in the construction of consciousness." -- Antonio Damasio, neurobiologist "... emotion is not a luxury: it is an expression of basic mechanisms of life regulation developed in evolution, and is indispensable for survival. It plays a critical role in virtually all aspects of learning, reasoning and creativity. Somewhat surprisingly, it may play a role in the construction of consciousness." -- Antonio Damasio, neurobiologist 122. Design Principle: Aesthetics - Affect Product personality influences our perceptions Product personality influences our perceptions 123. Design Principle: Aesthetics - Affect 124. Design Principle: Aesthetics - Affect 125. Design Principle: Aesthetics - Affect 126. Design Principle: Aesthetics - Affect Why should we care? People identify with (or avoid) certain personalities Trust is related to personality Perception and expectations are linked with personality Why should we care? People identify with (or avoid) certain personalities Trust is related to personality Perception and expectations are linked with personality 127. Design Principle: Aesthetics - Affect Why should we care? Consumers "choose" products that are an extension of themselves We treat sufficiently advanced technology as though it were human Consider: What kind of personality are you creating with your application? And what expectations does this personality bring with it? Why should we care? Consumers "choose" products that are an extension of themselves We treat sufficiently advanced technology as though it were human Consider: What kind of personality are you creating with your application? And what expectations does this personality bring with it? 128. Design Principle: Aesthetics Trust and Credibility 129. Design Principle: Aesthetics Trust and Credibility According to a study, the "appeal of the overall visual design of a site, including layout, typography, font size, and color schemes", is the number one factor we use to evaluate a website's credibility According to a study, the "appeal of the overall visual design of a site, including layout, typography, font size, and color schemes", is the number one factor we use to evaluate a website's credibility 130. Design Principle: Aesthetics Trust and Credibility Aside from providing the basics, such as reliable information and uptime, attention to design details implies that the same care and attention has been spent on the other (less visible) parts of the product which implies that this is a trustworthy product Aside from providing the basics, such as reliable information and uptime, attention to design details implies that the same care and attention has been spent on the other (less visible) parts of the product which implies that this is a trustworthy product 131. Design Principle: Aesthetics "affect, which is inexplicably linked to attitudes, expectations and motivations, plays a significant role in the cognition of product interaction... the perception that affect and cognition are independent, separate information processing systems is flawed." "affect, which is inexplicably linked to attitudes, expectations and motivations, plays a significant role in the cognition of product interaction... the perception that affect and cognition are independent, separate information processing systems is flawed." 132. Design Principle: Aesthetics 133. Summary Difference between Websites and Web Applications Research Techniques for Knowing Your Users Task Analysis UI/UX Design Principles for Web Applications Usability Affordance Intuitiveness Responsiveness Forgiveness Difference between Websites and Web Applications Research Techniques for Knowing Your Users Task Analysis UI/UX Design Principles for Web Applications Usability Affordance Intuitiveness Responsiveness Forgiveness 134. Summary UI/UX Design Principles for Web Applications Consistency Familiarity Efficiency Accessibility Simplicity Aesthetics UI/UX Design Principles for Web Applications Consistency Familiarity Efficiency Accessibility Simplicity Aesthetics 135. References Difference between UI and UX http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2012/06/ui-vs-ux-wha http://www.helloerik.com/ux-is-not-ui Designing UI for Business Web Applications http://uxdesign.smashingmagazine.com/2010/02/25/desig Designing for Real People http://52weeksofux.com/post/385981879/you-are-not-you Task Analysis http://www.usability.gov/how-to-and-tools/methods/task- http://www.usabilitypost.com/2009/04/15/8-characterist Difference between UI and UX http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2012/06/ui-vs-ux-wha http://www.helloerik.com/ux-is-not-ui Designing UI for Business Web Applications http://uxdesign.smashingmagazine.com/2010/02/25/desig Designing for Real People http://52weeksofux.com/post/385981879/you-are-not-you Task Analysis http://www.usability.gov/how-to-and-tools/methods/task- http://www.usabilitypost.com/2009/04/15/8-characterist 136. References Designing and Selecting Components for Uis http://uxmag.com/articles/designing-amp-selecting-com Why Consistency is Critical http://www.sitepoint.com/why-consistency-is-critical/ Forgiveness in UI Design http://www.jankoatwarpspeed.com/forgiveness-in-ui-desi Web Form Validation: Best Practices and Tutorials http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2009/07/07/web-form Designing and Selecting Components for Uis http://uxmag.com/articles/designing-amp-selecting-com Why Consistency is Critical http://www.sitepoint.com/why-consistency-is-critical/ Forgiveness in UI Design http://www.jankoatwarpspeed.com/forgiveness-in-ui-des Web Form Validation: Best Practices and Tutorials http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2009/07/07/web-form 137. References 7 Interface Design Techniques to Simplify and Declutter your Interfaces http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2009/02/7-interface- Restraint http://www.usabilitypost.com/2009/10/02/restraint/ In Defense of Eye Candy http://alistapart.com/article/indefenseofeyecandy 7 Interface Design Techniques to Simplify and Declutter your Interfaces http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2009/02/7-interface- Restraint http://www.usabilitypost.com/2009/10/02/restraint/ In Defense of Eye Candy http://alistapart.com/article/indefenseofeyecandy 138. References 12 Useful Techniques for Good User Interface Design in Web Applications http://uxdesign.smashingmagazine.com/2009/01/19/12-us 8 Characteristics of Successful User Interfaces http://www.usabilitypost.com/2009/04/15/8-characteristic 12 Useful Techniques for Good User Interface Design in Web Applications http://uxdesign.smashingmagazine.com/2009/01/19/12-u 8 Characteristics of Successful User Interfaces http://www.usabilitypost.com/2009/04/15/8-characteristic