mgis capstone walking for leisure 2013

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Walking for Leisure

Walking for LeisureValidating an Urban Design Qualities Audit Instrument1George W. SprehnAdviser: Kelleann FosterGEOG 596ASpring II 2013

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Outline2IntroductionStudy areaUrban redevelopmentProject objectivesHypothesis Background researchStreetscapeWalkabilitySpatial assessment toolsMethodologyStreet segmentsAudit selectionAudit implementationSpatial analysisExpected resultsTimeline

Photo: Miller and Dunham 2013Sidewalk dining on First Street

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Introduction3

Lee CountyFort MyersFloridaStudy Area:Downtown Historic and River Districts

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Introduction4Urban redevelopment:54-block utilities and streetscape$60 million ($12.5 million streetscape)International award5 state awards

Project Objectives:Rate the walkability of the redevelopmentarea of downtown Ft. Myers

Identify a measurement toolMeasure walkabilityValidate the tool

Develop Hypothesis:

The measurement tool is substantiated by the variable quality of the built environment

Photo: Miller and Dunham 2013Photo: Miller and Dunham 2013Plaza de Leon

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Background Research5Initial Research TopicsStreetscapeWalkabilitySpatial assessment tools

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Background Research6Initial Research TopicsStreetscapeWalkabilitySpatial assessment toolsStreetscapeAccessibilityPleasurabilityPerceived safety from trafficPerceived safety from crime(Day et al. 2006)

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Background Research7Initial Research TopicsStreetscapeWalkabilitySpatial assessment toolsStreetscapeAccessibilityPleasurabilityPerceived safety from trafficPerceived safety from crimeWalkabilityPedestrian performance and preferencesQuality of environmentQuantity of pedestriansComfort and safetyLand use and streetscape factors(Lo, 2009)(Day et al. 2006)

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Background Research8Initial Research TopicsStreetscapeWalkabilitySpatial assessment toolsStreetscapeAccessibilityPleasurabilityPerceived safety from trafficPerceived safety from crimeWalkabilityPedestrian performance and preferencesQuality of environmentQuantity of pedestriansComfort and safetyLand use and streetscape factorsSpatial assessment toolsAssess urban design qualitiesMeasure featuresScale to street-level variablesEnable GISEnable PDA

(Lo, 2009)(Day et al. 2006)(Ewing and Handy 2009)

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Background Research9

(Ewing & Handy 2009)

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Methodology10A. Determine spatial assessment tool (audit instruments)

NEWS Neighborhood Environment Walkability Survey

SPACES Systematic Pedestrian and Cycling Environment Scan

PEDS Pedestrian Environment Data Scan

Irving-Minnesota Inventory

Active Living Research (ALR) Audit Tool

Determine spatial assessment toolIdentify evaluation segmentsImplement the assessment tool Spatial analysis

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Methodology11Table 1. Perceptual qualitiesadaptability distinctiveness intricacy richnessambiguity diversity legibility sensuousnesscentrality dominance linkage singularityclarity enclosure meaning spaciousnesscoherence expectancy mystery territorialitycompatibility focality naturalness texturecomfort formality novelty transparencycomplementarity human scale openness unitycomplexity identifiability ornateness upkeepcontinuity imageability prospect varietycontrast intelligibility refuge visibilitydeflection interest regularity vividnessdepth intimacy rhythm(Ewing & Handy, 2009)1. imageability 2. enclosure3. human scale4. transparency5. complexityUrban Design Qualities

Active Living Research (ALR) Audit ToolPanel of expertsOperationalize qualitiesObjective measuresSubjective perceptionsStreet segments

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Methodology12

Active Living Research (ALR) Audit Tool

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1. Imageability sense of place

HIGHLOW13

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2. Enclosure room-like quality

HIGHLOW14

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3. Human Scale human proportions

HIGHLOW15

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4. Transparency continuous exposure

HIGHLOW16

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5. Complexity visual richness

HIGHLOW17

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2. Enclosure room-like qualityScoring Demonstration

HIGHLOW18

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Scoring Sheet

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Scoring Sheet Detail

Recorded ValuesMultiplierConstant

= Walkability Score20

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Methodology21

Photo: Miller and Dunham 2013street segment: about one block inlength, 300 feet or about 120 pacesProposed ApproachB. Identify evaluation segmentsSelect 9 street segmentsSubjective observationsHigh, Medium, Low qualityC. Implement the assessment tool ALR Audit ToolObjective measurementsDetermine spatial assessment toolSubjective/objectiveALR Audit ToolD. Spatial analysisOverall walkability scoresUrban design qualitiesALR Tool validation

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Methodology22

(Park and Kang, 2011)D. Spatial analysisOverall walkability scoresUrban design qualitiesALR Tool validationThis diagram by Park and Kang (2011) iswhat I have in mind to show the walkabilityratings. Color-coded segments would indicate the values of the five urban qualitieseach mapped separately for analysis.

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Expected Results23Project objectivesMeasure walkabilityAssess urban design qualitiesValidate the audit tool2. Assess urban design qualitiesActive Living Research Audit ToolImageabilityEnclosureHuman scaleTransparencyComplexity 1. Measure walkability3. Validate the audit tool

First Street Fort Myers FLPhoto: Miller and Dunham 2013

(Park and Kang, 2011)

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Expected Results24

ESRI Story Map conceptShowcaseUrban quality tabsImageabilityEnclosureHuman scaleTransparencyComplexity Templates Pop-upsMaps InteractiveStory linehttp://storymaps.esri.com/home/

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Timeline25MayPeer review presentationAudit preparationFinal design elementsTraining JuneAdminister AuditUpload audit resultsJulySpatial analysisWrite upOctober: PresentationGIS Expo W. Palm Beach FLand Story Map

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Thank youIntroductionBackgroundMethodologyAnalysis Expected ResultsTimelineAdvisersKelleann Foster, Department of Landscape ArchitectureDr. Douglas MillerBeth King John A. Dutton e-Education InstituteCollege of Earth and Mineral SciencesPennsylvania State University26

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Questions and Answers27

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