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  • LITERARY HISTORYThe Renaissance

  • Renaissance literatureRenaissance 1485 1603:Nowadays the Renaissance is seen as a very complex period that started long before the 16th century (esp. in Italy, 1350). The transition period mainly comprised the change from faith to secularism and from faith to reason.

  • Renaissance literatureRenaissance 1485 1603:The Renaissance was caused by a growing interest in religion, economics and greed/expansionism. In Italy the Renaissance started in 1450, in England only in 1500 (after the Reformation).

  • Renaissance literature1453 - Fall of Constantinople scientists and artists emigrated to the West, mainly to Rome and Italy. There is a transition from Medieval thinking towards modern thinking. Greek and Roman thinkers became examples for the arts and therefore a new way of thinking arose. Renaissance 1485 1603:Renaissance = rebirth

  • Renaissance literature1453 - Fall of Constantinople

  • Renaissance literatureThe Renaissance was a rebirth both of Man and of Classical Learning and Culture

  • Renaissance literatureThe Rebirth of Man in the Middle Ages, man was valued for being like others, whereas in the Renaissance man was valued for the way in which he differed from others. Therefore, the Renaissance attempted to develop all mans potentialities.

  • Renaissance literatureThe Rebirth of Classical learning and culture is shown in Renaissance Humanism: A preference for original classical scholarshipA critical mindEmphasis on life on earthA taste for the ethics of ancient Greece and Rome mixed with Christian principlesAcceptance of Platos theoriesScience: change from deductive methods to the inductive method of Francis Bacon

  • Renaissance literatureWilliam Caxton (ca. 1415~1422 ca. March 1492) was an English merchant, diplomat, writer and printer. He is thought to be the first English person to work as a printer and the first to introduce a printing press into England. He was also the first English retailer of printed books (his London contemporaries in the same trade were all Flemish, German or French). Ideas could now be spread because of the art of printing.

  • Renaissance literatureCaxtonShowing the First Specimen of His Printing to KingEdward IVat the Almonry, Westminster, Daniel Maclise, 1851

  • Renaissance literatureRenaissance Changes

    Religion:memento mori became carpe diemDecline of the influence of the Catholic churchMans broadened horizonsSpread of learningbookprinting

  • Renaissance literatureRenaissance Changes

    Politics: The break-up of the Feudal system (based on a two-class society and the RC Church) had 3 main causes:men are not of equal talent, ambition or imaginationthe Church lost its influence over societyeconomic changes (brought about by the Crusades)

  • Renaissance literatureRenaissance Changes

    Society:important to investigate life on earth (reaction on medieval times)New attitude towards women (Middle Ages: despised (Eve) or worshipped)society expanded rapidly

  • Renaissance literatureRenaissance Changes

    Economics:

    Columbus & Vasco da Gama discovered that the world was not flatForeign trade money knowledgeSpirit of adventure

  • Renaissance literatureRenaissance Changes

    Art:Art for arts sakeRise of individualism, men are not of equal talent, ambition, imaginationfocus on feelings: e.g. loveNew interest in the Classicssonnet (classical form derived from Italian Latin poetry)travel stories

  • Renaissance literatureThe Vitruvian Man

    Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) was one of the eras leading polymaths, making important contributions to the arts, sciences and humanities. We can call him a Homo Universalis, which is typical for the Renaissance.

  • Renaissance literatureThe English Reformation (1509-1547)

    Henry VIII broke free from the Catholic churchand founded the Anglican church. The Monarch became the head of the church. Main shift: viewpoint from other-worldly to the here and now. England occupieda position in between, with neither Reformation (like in Germany), nor Renaissance (like in Italy). Something new was added in the Renaissance (19th century view).

  • Renaissance literatureHenry VIII (1491-1547)

    Henry VIII was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. He was Lord, and later King, of Ireland, as well as continuing the nominal claim by the English monarchs to the Kingdom of France. Henry was the second monarch of the House of Tudor, succeeding his father, HenryVII.

  • Renaissance literatureHenry VIII (1491-1547) Besides his six marriages, Henry VIII is knownfor his role in the separation of the Church of England from the Roman Catholic Church.Henry's struggles with Rome led to the separation of the Church of England from papal authority, the Dissolution of the Monasteries, and establishing himself as the Supreme Head of the Church of England. Yet he remained a believer in core Catholic theological teachings, even after his excommunication from the Catholic Church.

  • Renaissance literatureThe Six Wives of Henry VIII

  • Renaissance literatureThe Elizabethan age is of a piece with what went before andwhat came after it. The Elizabethans could afford to indulgein drama precisely because the moral standards were sopowerful. Order, sin and redemption were fused in practice. At the same time the Elizabethans could combine extremes of optimism andpessimism, there was no tyranny of general opinion one way or the other.This one of the things that seperates the Elizabethans from the Victorian world(doctrine of progress).The Elizabethan Worldpicture (1558-1603)

  • Renaissance literatureThe Elizabethans pictured the universal order under 3 main forms:

    a chain a series of correspondences or planes a dance

    The Elizabethan Worldpicture (1558-1603)

  • Renaissance literatureThe Chain of Being: The chain stretched from the foot of Gods throne to the meanest of inanimate objects. The idea began with Platos Timaeus, was developed by Aristotle, was adopted by the Alexandrian Jews, was spreadby the neo-Platonists and fromthe Middle Ages till the 18th century was a commonplace, more taken for granted than set forth.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_chain_of_being The Elizabethan Worldpicture (1558-1603)

  • Renaissance literaturemere existence: animate class The Elizabethan Worldpicture (1558-1603)existence+life: vegetative class existence+life+feeling: sensitive class existence/life/feeling+ understanding = man

  • Renaissance literatureThe Chain of Being: Shakespeare, though always concerned with mans position in the chain, only in The Tempest considers the chain itself.The Elizabethan Worldpicture (1558-1603)

  • Renaissance literaturePetrarca

    Francesco Petrarca (20 July1304 19 July 1374), known inEnglish as Petrarch, was anItalian scholar and poet, andone of the earliest humanists.Petrarch is often called theFather of Humanism.

  • Renaissance literatureThe Petrarcan Sonnet

    A Petrarcan sonnet is almost always about an impossible, hopeless and cleansing love for an unattainable lover who has this almost heavenly beauty.

  • Renaissance literatureThe Petrarcan Sonnet

    A Petrarcan sonnet contains 14 lines:1 octave (= 2 quatrains = 2 stanzas of 4 lines 1 sextet (= 2 terzets = 2 stanzas of 3 lines a maximum of 5 rhymewords possible rhymeschemes: abba abba cdd cddabba abba cdd ceeabba abba cde cde

  • Renaissance literatureSir Thomas Wyatt

    Sir Thomas Wyatt (15031542)was a 16th-century Englishambassador and lyrical poet,who lived at Henry VIIIs court.He is credited with introducingthe sonnet into English.

  • Renaissance literatureWhoso List to Hunt

    Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind, But as for me, alas, I may no more - The vain travail hath worried me so sore, I am of them that farthest come behind. Yet may I, by no means, my wearied mind Draw from the deer, but as she fleeth afore, Fainting I follow. I leave off therefore, Since in a net I seek to hold the wind.Who list her hunt, I put him out of doubt, As well as I, may spend his time in vain. And graven with diamonds in letters plainThere is written her fair neck round about: Noli me tangere, for Caesar's I am, And wild FOR to hold, though I seem tame.

  • Renaissance literatureWhoso List to Hunt - rhymescheme

    Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind, But as for me, alas, I may no more - The vain travail hath worried me so sore, I am of them that farthest come behind. Yet may I, by no means, my wearied mind Draw from the deer, but as she fleeth afore, Fainting I follow. I leave off therefore, Since in a net I seek to hold the wind.Who list her hunt, I put him out of doubt, As well as I, may spend his time in vain. And graven with diamonds in letters plainThere is written her fair neck round about: Noli me tangere, for Caesar's I am, And wild FOR to hold, though I seem tame.

  • Whoso List to Hunt

    Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind, But as for me, alas, I may no more - The vain travail hath worried me so sore, I am of them that farthest come behind. Yet may I, by no means, my wearied mind Draw from the deer, but as she fleeth afore, Fainting I follow. I leave off therefore, Since in a net I seek to hold the wind.Who list her hunt, I put him out of doubt, As well as I, may spend his time in vain. And graven with diamonds in letters plainThere is written her fair neck round about: Noli me tangere, for Caesar's I am, And wild FOR to hold, though I seem tame. quatrainquatrainterzetterzetoctaves

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