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  • 1

    iPad Analog Midi Sequencer v1.11

    AMS Software is proud to present its first iPad app: midiSequencer. A Midi Step

    Sequencer for your Apple iPad with analog style slider controls and special features

    aimed at interaction, performance and special effects.

    Note : This manual describes the full version of midiSequencer – the lite version is

    limited in many of the functions you have from the full version.

    Note :Midi FX, Chord & Added notes are available only as IAPs in the full version,

    and Audiobus is not available in the Lite version.

    The Midi FX manual can be found here

    http:\\amssoftware.org\manuals\midiFx_manual.pdf

    Tony Saunders

    AMS Software © 2014.

    http://amssoftware.org/manuals/midiFx_manual.pdf

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    Fig 1. If midiSequencer was hardware!

    Contents

    iPad Analog Midi Sequencer v1.11 ............................................................................... 1

    Contents ................................................................................................................... 2

    Terminology ............................................................................................................. 4

    What’s new in v1.11 .................................................................................................. 7

    Here is what was new in v1.10 .................................................................................. 8

    Overview .................................................................................................................. 9

    MidiSequencer Schematic ....................................................................................... 11

    Quick Start ............................................................................................................. 14

    Example setups ....................................................................................................... 15

    How to play an iPad Synth: ................................................................................. 15

    How to play an external hardware synth or DAW: ............................................ 16

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    The Cycle Reset ....................................................................................................... 17

    The Sequencer Steps ............................................................................................... 17

    What is Time? ........................................................................................................ 18

    Fader Section ......................................................................................................... 21

    Show Buttons ......................................................................................................... 25

    Controls Section – Limit/Link/Draw/Random ..................................................... 25

    Tempo Section ....................................................................................................... 29

    Transpose Section .................................................................................................. 32

    The Transport Controls .......................................................................................... 33

    The Logic Controls ................................................................................................. 34

    Show Buttons ......................................................................................................... 35

    Invert Key ............................................................................................................... 35

    Record button ....................................................................................................... 37

    Reset button ........................................................................................................... 37

    Midi section ............................................................................................................ 38

    Skip (or Step Option) Button ................................................................................. 40

    Previous/Next step: ............................................................................................ 41

    Use these buttons to cycle through the 16 steps whilst keeping the panel open. 41

    Muting: ............................................................................................................... 41

    Play Logic: .......................................................................................................... 41

    Cycle Resets: ....................................................................................................... 42

    Ornamentation ....................................................................................................... 43

    Options Panel ......................................................................................................... 46

    WIST ................................................................................................................... 47

    Tempo Master/Slave .......................................................................................... 47

    Midi Clock .......................................................................................................... 47

    Midi Clock Rotary ............................................................................................... 48

    You would want to send midi clock messages to Output Latency ...................... 48

    Record Options Note/Vel/Gate/Ch/CC/CC32 ................................................... 48

    Record Midi Ch................................................................................................... 49

    Playback Options ................................................................................................ 49

    Swing Odd/Even ................................................................................................ 50

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    Scale after Transpose.......................................................................................... 50

    KeyScale/Launch/Step & Note Time Buttons......................................................... 51

    Key Scale Panel ...................................................................................................... 52

    Settings................................................................................................................... 55

    Performance Panel ................................................................................................. 58

    Inputs & Outputs on the Devices Panel ................................................................. 60

    MidiSequencer Inputs ............................................................................................ 60

    MidiSequencer Outputs ......................................................................................... 62

    Files & Current Bank .............................................................................................. 64

    Files Panel .......................................................................................................... 66

    Snapshots Panel ................................................................................................. 69

    Controller Panel ..................................................................................................... 72

    Pick Controller Panel ............................................................................................. 76

    Recording CC’s ................................................................................................... 78

    Using MidiThru to play Fx ......................................................................................... 79

    Using MidiSequencer with Audiobus ........................................................................ 79

    Chords & Added Notes .............................................................................................. 83

    Midi Learn – Autimating MS ..................................................................................... 88

    Midi Continuous Controllers ..................................................................................... 90

    Common Issues & Useful info ................................................................................... 92

    Support ...................................................................................................................... 95

    Terminology Every app has its own terminology!

    MS – shorthand for MidiSequencer in this document.

    Audiobus (or AB)– is an audio host app that can host MS as an input (even though MS has no audible audio). It’s primary use it to be saved in AB presets

    and to be able to control MS from other apps loaded into AB (mini controls).

    Background mode. Needed to allow apps to work while minimized and in the

    background. Audio apps (incl MS) need to have this enabled to work.

    Banks – named group of 40 snapshots that can be saved to the Documents

    folder of the app (as a file). The Bank Panel (accessible via the Files button)

    will manage these (new, delete, rename, share).

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    Chords – are really just extra notes played with the step note. The can be musically inverted, cleared and individually tweaked. A Chord Panel exists to

    enter these by touching a keyboard or selecting preset buttons.

    Controller – Is a midi control message. A sequence has reference to up to 16

    controllers. These can be CC, NRPN,RPN,Program Change,

    Aftertouch(mono/poly), Pitchbend or Sysex(or any bytes you want). Some

    controls have 2 byte data, so use A or B to select these.

    CoreMidi – Is Apple IOS name for midi messaging. To route message, it

    maintains a list of all active sources and destinations. Any app would read

    input from a source(e.g. to allow a midi note on to play a sound), and write

    midi (e.g. notes to play another app sound) to destinations. Midi messages are

    all about control and emulate many of the things you would do on a keyboard

    say (press a note, release a note, tweak a control, play a clock at a certain

    tempo, dump a bank, etc)

    Cycle – step sequencers play one step after another. When they reach the end

    they need to reset, this represents a cycle. MS is unique in that virtually all

    actions (e.g. change a step note value) can be delayed until this cycle resets.

    This enables you to queue up changes that are applied for the next cycle.

    Devices – CoreMidi endpoints (e.g. USM Port 1). This includes real (hardware

    ports) and virtual ones (apps can create named ports). MS will present each

    endpoint in the Devices Panel to allow you to enable it for input or output.

    Drawing – a quick way to set the 16 analog sliders is by drawing across the screen, otherwise you would need to either double tap or touch the control to

    move. MS supports drawing for many functions (e.g. notes or %probability).

    Enharmonic naming – in music notes can be spelt up to 4 ways (e.g. G,Fx,Abb or Eb/D# are the same notes). MS will use your picked Key scale to label notes

    using enharmonic spellings.

    Fx – MS includes 9 different types of midi effects. Many of these transform the

    note pitch, velocity or channel of the step note –e.g. Ostinato creates an

    additional note to follow the step note, Filter mutes notes in certain ranges.

    Each sequence can define up to 8 fx slots to play (and the order they apply).

    Each step can additionally disable an effect slot.

    Fx can be saved per snapshot.

    Humanise – used to create per step variations on pitch & velocity. MS allows

    extreme ranges for these (+/- 127). You can set the %chance this will be

    applied and the range of the effect.

    Invert – will reflect midi notes around a note you pick as the invert. Notes higher will reflect to be lower, and higher reflect lower.

    Key – Music scales are represented in MS and are used to conform the controls

    & often the transforms (e.g. transpose, fx) to keep to the musical scales. E.g.

  • 6

    D# would be changed to C in C Major. It is possible to bypass this scaling for

    individual steps or on transforms.

    Linked controls – enable you to move all 16 step controls together. For music

    scales, this could alter the relative intervals, so an option exists to keep the

    intervals intact. This is independent per control type (e.g. notes & vel).

    MASTER mode –MS will use its own internal clock and can transmit clock start/stop/continue & timing messages over midi.

    Midi Clock – MS can send and receive MTC (midi time clock) signals. These are used by other applications that run as a SLAVE in that they will attempt to

    match the tempo. In MS, this is optional and you can select which outputs to

    send it to. When MS is in SLAVE mode, only one device can be the clock

    source.

    Mute – steps can be muted from playing – but in a step sequencer they maintain the rhythm (by playing silence). No midi is sent for a muted step.

    OMAC – Open Music App Collaboration refers to the ability of registered apps to launch other registered apps.

    Options – refers to the settings available in the Options Panel (see Options

    button at top of screen)

    Ornamentation – these are musical embellishments to a step note. They break the step note into two or more notes (e.g. acciaccatura plays a fast note a tone

    higher than the step, before playing the step note for the remainder of the

    time).

    Pick CC Panel – a panel that shows you the step values of the CC picked. This

    panel shows (in text) what sort of CC it is. It is split into A & B for those

    controls that require two bytes of data (e.g. pitchwheel).

    Play Logic can be picked for Forward, Reverse, Bounce & Random and steps can also individually be set to jump (to a numbered step or the start of the

    sequence) or repeat before continuing, or stop.

    Probability – Each step can now have a %chance to play. 100% means always,

    0% means muted, so any value between will vary when the step is played.

    A FX % probability also exists which applies to all notes.

    Recording – MS can record incoming midi notes (note, velocity, channel) from the input to set the steps. If it is playing, then this will just transpose the

    current sequence. Midi Thru needs to be off.

    Repeated notes – an ornament that repeats a step up to 8 times.

    Ratchet – is a way of breaking one note into smaller notes of the same pitch. It

    is used for rhythm variations.

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    Settings – IOS has a Settings app. Many apps have application type settings

    stored here as defaults. MS has some too (e.g. to enable one tap load). Note:

    These must be set before running MS app.

    Sequence – the set of 16 steps (chords, note, vel, channel, gate%, 16x2xCC

    data, %probability,%humanise (%chance, note & vel) and the transport

    controls (tempo, transpose, invert etc) plus key Scale. Also included are the 16

    CC’s (e.g. sysex data) and the 8 possible Fx.

    All of this is stored in a snapshot (in a slot) which makes up a bank (40

    snapshots) which can be stored/read as a named file.

    Skip Button – refers to the round rubber type button of a step – it is used on a step to set play logic, ornamentation, force chromatic and access chords & fx.

    SLAVE mode – where MS starting/stopping & tempo are controlled by

    external midi. MS will interpret the incoming midi clock to determine the

    bpm.

    Snapshots – A snapshot is a complete sequence saved as a numbered slot (1 to

    40). It can also include controls (e.g. Tempo).

    Step – one of 16, a step consists of midi (note, pitch, velocity, channel,

    16x2xCC Data), additional notes (e.g. chords) and status (e.g. muted,

    chromatic), together with Fx slot disables.

    StepTime/NoteTime. Time in MS is normally measured in fixed ‘step’ intervals (=tempo/4 seconds – as there are always 4 steps to a beat). Steps can play

    shorter or longer than this time(gate%). MS can however work in note

    duration time (NoteTime) which means a step plays for the duration of the

    note – for legato type effect.

    Swing – this effect is to delay even notes during play, giving the rhythm a dotted note feel. MS allows this to be set per step and the % (of the step time)

    to apply. An option exists to apply this to odd steps (1,3,5, etc) – so all steps.

    Transpose – allows the sequence pitch to be adjusted in semitones (+/-36). A pop up panel exists for you to easily pick during play.

    Virtual Midi – These are sources & destinations created by apps – they are

    typically named like the app (e.g. MidiSequencer or Sunrizer).

    What’s new in v1.11 This was a bug & performance update with just a few updates.

    Change list:

    Ability to auto-load last bank & snapshot

    Additional clock sync tempos (8/1,16/1 & 32/1) – so slower echoes.

    You can now clock divide the output midi clock (slower or faster) than main

    tempo.

  • 8

    Performance & Audio enhancements using IAA hosts (Audioshare, Audiobus

    etc)

    Linked controls now per type (e.g. Notes, Vel have their own setting)

    New Lock control – to avoid unwanted changes – but can still audition

    Here is what was new in v1.10 Thanks to everyone reporting issues and requesting enhancements. Your

    continued support benefits everyone using this sequencer. Change list:

    New Midi Fx – Ostinato – plays a shadow note with the step note

    Per step disable of Fx by slot.

    %Probability, Humanise (%chance, note & velocity ranges), Swing

    Filter output & input notes, CC’s Fx.

    Input FX – play midi into MS to apply a dummy step to Fx sent to all outputs

    Cycle reset option on numbered jumps

    Option for linked notes to keep relative note intervals (rather than conform to

    scale)

    Tempo now shown to 2dp for clock divisions (1/2, 1/3, ¼).

    Performance & Audio enhancements (Audiobus)

  • 9

    Overview

    This MidiSequencer iPad app is a 16 step sequencer with

    analog style sliders and a very special button called Cycle for

    delaying changes. It is equipped with step or note duration

    timing and special step (or midi effects) such as

    ornamentation and echoes.

    MS is an app that generates midi notes for you to trigger audio apps connected as outputs. It can also take some of its note generation from audio apps connected to the input (e.g to transpose its own generated sequence). As well as midi notes, controllers & data can be generated by MS.

    MS is squarely aimed at noodling rather than song composition. So it

    encourages you to create a sequence of notes and alter them whilst they are playing to achieve a much more interactive experience than a formal song. As such, as many functions as possible are only one or two taps away, and the cycle ability means you have time to make many changes before being applied altogether as the sequence starts again.

    Flexible routing allows network sessions and midi devices to be sources of midi

    input to the sequencer. Additionally, the sequencer can be setup as a virtual source or destination to allow dedicated midi messaging externally to & from other apps. With extremely high & low playback clock speeds (.25 to 1020+ BPM) it can accomplish special effects on your synth apps or external midi equipment not even available on hardware sequencers. As a SLAVE, it can utilise incoming midi clock to synchronise to your DAW or hardware synthesizer, as a MASTER it can be used to start/stop external slave devices.

    With the ability for each step to decide which step follows, the sequencer is capable of playing sub-sequences outside of the normal forward/reverse patterns. For example, you can jump to any other step after playing one step and thereby allow the sequencer to follow complex note patterns longer than the 16 steps.

    Up to 16 midi controllers can be defined for the sequence. Each of these 16 CC’s can then have step data assigned (one or two byte) to accompany playback of midi note etc. Controllers can be defined as continuous (0..127 – e.g. 1 is the mod wheel), parameter (NRPN or RPN), Program change, Aftertouch, Pitchbend or Sysex(which can send any data bytes you want).

    Recording midi data as steps is also possible and can recognise midi note, velocity, channel, and any controller values. Recording for each of these parameters can be selectively disabled in the Options. Additionally, you can select to record from only one midi channel, allowing you to use one midi source (e.g. a keyboard) to record from. Filters also exist to exclude notes or CC’s.

  • 10

    Playback can also be restricted to midi CC’s to enable you to play the notes on

    a keyboard and have MS control the synth by midi CC. Snapshots allow the current sequencer (with or without the transport controls) to be stored in up to 40 slots. They can be loaded or saved even when the sequencer is playing. In Cycle mode, this loading will occur at the cycle reset, allowing for creative changes during play. These 40 snapshots make up the current bank, which can now be saved as a named bank file to the documents folder of the ipad and shared via itunes/iFunBox etc. You can now draw the controls by swiping across the screen or even double tapping. Note values can be forced to a key scale, with options to ignore this. Midi Fx (available as an IAP) allow you to transform step notes, velocity or midi channel information using randomizing. For example, you could filter out note ranges, or play echoes, or add additional notes to a sequence. Define an fx rack with 8 slots and allow each step to choose which ones apply!

    Stuck for a sequence idea? Use Humanise for subtle variations, or %probability for rhythm changes. Notes a little plain? Add note ornamentations: mordents, appoggiatura, triplet or even a ratcheting style. With chord steps, ornaments decorate the step note. Step notes can now be repeated x8 times before continuing with the next step. MS is primarily a performance midi tool providing quick access to tempo, transposition, music scales, muting steps, ornaments, fx, CCs, chords and play logic together with the ability to load snapshots with the touch of a button or by automation. The addition of chords made up of any note/velocity value mean complex midi setups can be accomplished using channel or velocity switching. Adding midi fx echo, which will make your sequence sound like multiple sequences!

  • 11

    MidiSequencer Schematic MidiSequencer contains a lot of functionality, so the following diagram should

    help you understand the basic data flow in MS. I will describe each section as

    follows:

    CoreMidi Source

    On an ipad (i.e. IOS), midi message are transmitted to all apps by the

    coreAudio framework. This framework allows any app to inspect a list of valid

    sources – which mean inputs to MS.

    Midi can come from apps running on the ipad (e.g. Animoog, Nave etc), MS’s

    own virtual port (called MidiSequencer) or real hardware devices (like a

    hardware synth midi’d to a USB midi interface connected through CCK).

    Sources in one app are destinations in another.

    MS presents these to the user in a list, and you can individually turn them off,

    or filter certain messages. Note that this list is for each individual port on the

  • 12

    device (so you may get several of a similar name if the source device has more

    than one port). These are called endpoints in coreMidi terminology.

    Midi Input

    Sources (as a list of named device endpoints) provide your inputs. Normally

    you would turn these off, but you can drive MS from midi from other apps. MS

    allows each input to enable clock, midi note/on & CC messages, although one

    can be defined for the clock.

    To make best use of inputs you would put MS in record mode.

    CC32 is special in that it automates the loading of a snapshot (a complete

    sequence).

    CC’s can be recorded into MS, but as it is a step sequencer it will only use the

    value last set on a step.

    Note On messages can set the step note, velocity & channel.

    To use an input clock, MS would need to setup as a SLAVE (so it waits on clock

    start/stop & tick messages & calculates BPM accordingly).

    Another use for input is midi learn – where the main controls (e.g. tempo) can

    wait for the next CC value to set this control up to be automated. Any

    subsequent input of this CC will automate the control.

    Midi Thru

    MS has the ability, per input device, to send note on/off & CC’s directly to the

    currently active output devices (which may have notes or CC’s individually

    disabled). In this way Midi Thru acts as a one to many pass-through.

    Another use for MidiThru is fx, where any note on will play a dummy step

    (including any setup fx & CC’s) to the output. You could say connected a real

    keyboard up as source and have it play the fx in realtime. The note off is sent

    thru normally.

    Internal Clock

    MS has it’s own internal clock, which is driven by the tempo. This clock can be

    overridden (when MS is in SLAVE mode) to run from midi input clock source

    (24 clocks per beat, 6 per step), and listen to stop/start/continue.

    When MS is set to MASTER, it can send its own midi clock messages , and

    start/continue/stop to any selected output device. You can now divide this

    output clock (faster or slower using tempo sync) in Options panel.

  • 13

    Files

    MS stores everything in the /Documents folder of the ipad app. The main file

    is a .bank file and contains the complete set of up to 40 snapshots, where a

    snapshot is a complete sequence (16 steps, fx, CC’s, tempo, etc).

    With a bank containing 40 complete snapshots, the bank is first loaded into

    memory – from which the user can pick one of the 40 to load into the

    sequence. Saving works in reverse, save your sequence to one of the 40

    snapshot slots, and save the complete set of up to 40 snapshots as a named

    bank file.

    Sequencer

    Central to MS is the screen with 16 sliders setup as 4 beats (4 steps to a beat).

    This represents up to 16 steps, each of which can be controlled independently

    (e.g. using swipe gestures to draw the values).

    A sequence also contains controls for tempo, transposition, key scale, play

    logic, controller messages (up to 16 CC’s) and midi Fx (9 fx types in up to 8

    slots).

    Key scale can be used to conform step notes to a musical scale (e.g. Cminor),

    and will display enharmonic notes (e.g. Bbb rather than A).

    A step is more than just the note pitch, it contains velocity(loudness), length

    (up to 4 steps), midi channel, %probability of playing, %swing (delay),

    Humanising factors (%chance of applying a note &/or velocity variation),

    along with other things like mute, ornamentation, play-logic, latching,

    chromatic note, chords and added notes, fx slot disables.

    CC

    CC are available as an IAP. They are designed to give you control over the midi

    controller messages sent with steps. These include continuous controllers (like

    mod wheel), program changes, aftertouch, NRPN & RPN messages used on

    many hardware synths, and sysex (which can actually be any data you want).

    CC’s, like notes, can be filtered individually from each input & output device –

    e.g. to enable you to send just CC’s to a device and play keyboard to provide the

    notes.

    Midi Fx

    Midi fx are available as an IAP. They operate on step data and are designed to

    transform steps before and after being sent to the output devices. These can

  • 14

    transform pitch, velocity or midi channel before the note is sent to the outputs.

    It can even disable the note from being sent (fx filter). Some fx (echo &

    ostinato) also send additional transformed notes (as post fx).

    As mentioned earlier, you can use midi fx on dummy notes if using midi thru

    fx, or you could send fx to one device and notes to another.

    Per Device output & CoreMidi Destinations

    Like inputs, MS allows you to select which output devices to send

    step/CC/Fx/Clock data to. You can also add additional latency to delay the

    output per device.

    Normally, you only need to activate MidiSequencer as an output, but you can

    select individual destinations here if you want. Note: some apps don’t respond

    to their own named ports!

    If your output device is a USB midi interface, you can send midi to hardware

    synths.

    Quick Start

  • 15

    Fig 2. Main Screen sections

    The sequencer is laid out in 4 horizontal sections:

    Title : open panels such as file loading/saving, options, MidiLearn, Key Scale, Time

    & Exit

    Sliders : 16 step sliders here allow analog style control over note, velocity, gate,

    channel, and midi controllers 1-4. Buttons exist for skip logic and muting per step.

    Tempo, Control & Transpose: Controls for tempo, transpose and

    drawing/limiting.

    Transport: Controls for playing, loop logic (e.g. cycle), Slider display & Midi.

    MidiSequencer was primarily designed to work with hardware synths (via CCK or

    other external usb midi devices), but it is also capable of running synths on the ipad

    using coreMidi.

    Example setups

    How to play an iPad Synth:

    There are two ways to play iPad synths 1) Using MS Virtual midi and 2) Using the

    synth’s own VM(a similarly named device, e.g. Sunrizer).

    MS can send both ways, but only one is needed, so there is no need to have all device

    outputs enabled if you don’t need them.

    Note: some apps don’t accept midi in their own VM ports (e.g. Animoog) so option 1

    using MS VM, is generally preferred and should be tried first.

    Method 1 – Using MS Virtual Midi

    Runup the app & ensure it has background mode enabled.

    Runup MS and open the Devices Panel making sure you pick Output (rather

    than Input). Note: you could runup the app after MS, but would need to

    Refresh the list to see it.

    By default MS virtual midi (called simply MidiSequencer) is active by default,

    if not select MidiSequencer in the list and touch the Active button to make sure

    it is lit. If other app synths have entries in the list, you can deactivate them.

    Close the Devices panel

    Make sure the large Midi Mute button (bottom right) is lit (yellow with text

    Midi Send).

    Press Play (large triangular button – bottom left).

  • 16

    You should now see the steps being selected and the led’s being lit. You should

    also hear the audio from the app synth (if not, make sure the app has

    background audio on!).

    Move the sliders and note the changes in notes being produced by the synth

    app.

    Press Play button (shown as a large square) again to stop the sequence.

    The sliders you moved represent semitones with C3 being middle C on a

    keyboard. You can select one of the small blue buttons at the bottom to display

    velocity (loudness), channel (midi channel) gate %(duration of the note –

    default is 80%, but 400% means sustain for 4 step lengths) and the CC1-16

    (which need to be activated in the CC Panel). Other options exist for

    %probability, humanize etc.

    Whilst playing, move the tempo slider to alter the speed of the play (there are 4

    steps per beat meaning at 60BPM steps are played once every .25 seconds).

    Method 2 – Using Synth App Virtual Midi

    As Method 1, but select the app by name in the output list and make that active

    instead of MidiSequencer in the list.

    Network sessions work the same, but they are disabled by default in the

    Settings (and must be set before running up MS). There is however additional

    latency (delay) in using network sessions.

    How to play an external hardware synth or DAW:

    Playing hardware requires that you connect a USB midi device to the ipad. This can

    be done utilizing the CCK (Camera Connection Kit) as this has an ability to plug USB

    devices into the ipad.

    Using a small interface (like the Edirol UM which has an advanced driver) you don’t

    have to power the interface. Larger interfaces, or those without drivers will need

    power.

    With the USB midi interface plugged into the CCK, when running up MS the ports

    will be shown in the Devices Panel under Inputs & Outputs. You can activate these

    and have MS transmit to any outputs that are active and also enable for inputs.

    Often, midi interfaces have leds which light up when midi is detected, so you can use

    this as a visual clue that midi is being transmitted.

    Plug your hardware devices (synths, other midi interfaces) into this USB midi

    interface to complete the connection. MS will only know the name of the USB midi

    interface as it does not know the name of any equipment connected to the midi

    ports.

  • 17

    Press Play and you should hear your hardware devices playing something.

    If your midi interface is connected to a DAW, you will be able to record midi (e.g.

    Ableton Live running on a PC), or play software apps (vst) on the DAW that can

    respond to midi. Note that there will be additional delays in running software

    remotely, so be sure to delay any faster routes (e.g. a synth playing on the ipad at the

    same time) to keep them synchronized.

    The Cycle Reset

    If you are like me, you love playing sequenced step music but

    can never seem to hit that transpose button at the right point

    of the cycle to make a change of key say. Delay too long and

    the first note in the sequence will be in the old key. Transpose

    too fast and you risk playing the last note of a sequence at the

    new key!

    Add to this mix a desire to change a myriad of elements of the sequence on the fly and you are sure to fail on all but the slowest of tempos!

    MS was designed to allow you to make multiple changes to a sequence whilst it

    is playing and have them all applied seamlessly when the cycle resets back to the first step. In this way you can perform many more changes than would be possible if the controls were just updated instantaneously.

    The CYCLE button (located in the middle of the transport controls) can be activated whenever you want to ensure that any further changes are stored and applied with the cycle reset. An led on this button will light to show you when this occurs. It can be switched on and off during play.

    With the CYCLE button inactive (shown as gray), then changes will be applied

    immediately the next step plays and nothing is delayed until the reset. Note : Cycle works on most elements of MS (even loading snapshots), but

    does not (yet) work on tempo.

    The Sequencer Steps

    Steps represent an activity that occurs at regular time intervals. There are 16 of them on this sequencer, numbered 1 to 16 and laid out left to right across the main screen.

    An individual step is like pressing a key on a keyboard. It starts with a key press (midi on message) and ends with lifting the key (midi note off). If the step (or midi output) is not muted, the sequencer will transmit these midi messages

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    according to the control settings you have set on the step (ornaments & chords vary this).

    Steps are able to show different their different values (Note, Velocity, Gate%, Channel, Midi CC1 to 16 A or B, %Probability, %Swing, Humanise Chance/Note/Vel) by using the set of Show buttons at the bottom of the screen.

    The sequencer uses the skip buttons of each step to determine what is the next step to play. If it has an impossible selection, then the sequence will stop.Step Channel strip

    Fig 7. Step Controls

    The steps are laid out like a channel strip on a mixer 1 to 16, left to right. The Control slider can be moved vertically between the two blue buttons – low values at the bottom, high at the top. The blue buttons allow the control slider to be incremented or decremented by 1 for fine control (may be more if note and conforming to scale). The Select Area & LED are touch areas to allow you to select this step from the 16 available. You can do this whilst playing too to interrupt the sequence logic! It shows as yellow if a chromatic step. The Skip button determines the logic for this step (and also chromatic & chords) The Step value is displayed at the bottom in the units for the controls shown (i.e. Note names for Notes, values for velocity & channel or CC1-16, and percentages for Gate%. The step value is also colored Red for latched, yellow for chromatic. The mute button will silence the step (like x in skip button). Normally it is a green button, but changes to blue if the step has any added notes or chords.

    What is Time? This sequencer is able to playback a sequence of steps in two types of time mode:

    Step-time (regular intervals where Gate% dictates how much of the time interval is used to keep the note on (i.e. time before the note-off stops the note-on). It enables the sequencer to play arpeggios and regular pulses of notes. This is the default type of time used when you launch the Sequencer.

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    Note-time (gated length), where the notes are legato as the time interval is always the Gate % and there is no appreciable gap between note off and note on (unless a step is muted). This mode allows more interesting musical timings.

    The diagram below indicates what happens when the sequencer is in one of

    these two modes. Note: Swing (introduced in v1.10) can delay the time too by shifting

    everything in the step (note on & off) to a slightly later time than t0. It’s not shown in these diagrams for clarity.

    Step Time Mode:

    Fig 8. Step Time using Gate% as note on time Step-Time, the default mode of the sequencer, will play regular rhythm

    patterns typical of many electronic hardware sequencers. Playing a sequence in this mode at high tempos or extreme pitches can create

    psycho-acoustic patterns and effects on many of today’s synthesizers. Varying step velocity, gate % and any of the CC’s can add to this effect, especially if modified during play.

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    Note that ornaments each utilize the Tempo interval differently (see the

    section on Ornaments) as they break up the note into smaller notes. Chords and added notes just play for the full gated interval (even if the step note is ornamented).

    Note Time Mode:

    Fig 9. Note Time for legato playing & ornaments

    Note-time will play the next step as soon as the previous step's note-off is sent. The effect of this is that it is possible to have no noticeable delay between steps , unless some steps are muted of course. This is equivalent to a legato playing style.

    Use the steps Gate% to determine how much of the time interval the note is sounded before sounding the next step.

    This mode is for more irregular timings that step-time as notes can be played

    with precise timing. Ornamental playing can be achieved if you choose smaller note intervals

    together with longer ones (e.g. Appoggiatura, Mordents or Trills), you just need to

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    set the gate% and step note pitches accordingly. However, you could use the built in ornaments (see the section on Ornaments).

    Fader Section

    In this part of the display, each step has its own vertical slice or step,

    numbered 1 to 16. The slider positions reflect the data value for the currently

    selected control.

    You can limit the range of the slider values (start & end) using the limit button

    – the sliders will reset to the range picked. These limits are not saved

    anywhere and are reset if you load a snapshot.

    The collection of buttons shown below are used to switch between step

    controls.

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    Note : C-2 to G8 (if middle C=60) or C-1 to G9(if middle C=48). It can be

    muted for recoding in the Options Panel. The middle C is an app preference

    found in the iPad’s SETTINGS app.

    For non-chromatic key scales, the note label will show the enharmonic

    spelling of the note name for that key (e.g. G# Maj shows Fx rather than G).

    Certain keys scales will also restrict the lower and upper range if the note is

    not in the scale. Midi Note 0 = C-2, 127=G8, so for C# Maj for example, the

    lowest note is C# (as there is no C) and the highest is F# (as there is no G).

    Velocity : 0 to 127 where 0 is the same as muting the step. It can be muted

    for recording in the Options Panel.

    Gate % : 1-400. Amount of the step time interval(i.e. the time between

    steps) to use before sending midi note off. This will be note duration for

    Note-time.

    Midi Channel : 1 to 16. This is per step Midi Channel. It can be muted for

    recording in the Options Panel.

    CC1 to CC16 with A or B selected: 0 to 127. This is where you set the

    controller data (as defined in Controller Panel) and is available in two slots

    A or B. The Controller type defines if A or B is used. Basically, B is only

    used where the controller is marked as 14bit, so 7 bit means using A only.

    Sysex has no controller data values – the sysex (or whatever data you want)

    is held in the Controller Panel

    %Probability: 0 to 100. This represents the % chance a step has to play –

    100% being always, 0% meaning never. Choose a value inbetween and MS

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    will have that % chance to play the note or exclude it entirely – which

    means no CC’s or Fx either.

    %Swing: 0 to 50. This represents a delay to playing the step measured

    relative to the step interval (even for noteTime). 0% means no delay. Think

    of this as the opposite of gate% (which restricts length of the note based on

    the step interval), this swing moves the whole note later in time.

    %Humanise: 0 to 100. This is the %chance that the step will be

    humanized, which means varied. Currently this applies to note pitch &

    velocity. 0% means ignore HumaniseNote & HumaniseVel

    HumaniseNote: 0 to 127. Is the variation to apply (in semitones) to the

    step note pitch if the %humanise is active. 0 means no variation, 1 means

    +/- 1 semitone, but you can do extreme ranges +/-127. Remember that

    notes outside of 0..127 range may not be played. This can be used to either

    create completely random notes (high number) or subtle note changes(low

    number on only a few steps).

    HumaniseVel: 0 to 127. Is the variation to apply to the step note velocity

    if the %humanise is active. 0 means no variation, but you can do extreme

    ranges +/-127 . Velocity can never be less than 0 or greater than 127, and a

    value of 0 will play the step but at 0 volume (some synths may treat this as a

    note off).

    Each step strip is made up of control buttons, leds & a slider(from top to bottom):

    An increment button, to add 1 to the current value

    shown. If the settings has linked set, this will

    move all sliders up(if not already at the top). The

    upper limit control may also restrict the max

    value.

    A control knob to change the value by sliding up

    or down

    A decrement button, to subtract 1 from the

    current value shown. If the settings has linked set,

    this will move all sliders down(if not already at

    the bottom). The lower limit control may also

    restrict the min value.

    A blue LED, which lights when the step is selected

    and is dim when not selected. Tap to select this

    step (even whilst playing).

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    A Skip button which will bring up a step options

    panel where you can set play logic (e.g. jump to

    another step after playing), latching, chromatic,

    chords, ornaments and which fx slots to disable.

    The Step Options panel is designed to remain

    open so selecting another step can be easily

    selected.

    A label, showing the current value the knob

    position represents for the type of controls

    shown. E.g. Notes display note names such as

    F#8.

    This label can also be coloured. White for normal

    scale note, Yellow for chromatic (so outside of

    scale) and Red if latched (no midi off sent with

    midi on).

    Mute button. Quickly turns the step into a rest. In

    StepTime this will not play the step and wait the

    step interval time before playing the next step. In

    NoteTime, this step is ignored – so jumps

    immediately to the next step. Sequence patterns

    often involve rests to create rhythmic variations,

    and if the previous step has fx echoes say, it

    would allow you to hear those echoes.

    This button is also coloured (if not muted) blue if

    the step has chords/added notes. Normally it is

    green.

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    Show Buttons

    This section shows 5 buttons(plus two smaller for A & B) laid out as a grid.

    Only one of these may be selected (highlighted label shows as yellow) at one

    time.

    Pressing one of these buttons will quickly update the central step controls to

    show the corresponding settings for Notes, Velocity, Gate%, Midi Channel,

    Midi control 1..16 (with a choice of A or B)

    The A & B are only enabled if you select the larger CC button and then only if

    that CC is defined as two byte (see CC panel)

    Also used are show are the %probability,%swing,

    %Humanise/HumaniseNote/HumaniseVel

    Controls Section – Limit/Link/Draw/Random The controls section, sitting between the Tempo & Transpose sliders, has controls

    that affect the 16 sliders.

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    Limit

    Allows you to set a temporary upper and lower limit for the controls shown

    (notes, velocity, channel, gate% or each of the 16 midi CC’s – although this

    limit affects both A & B).

    This is useful for two reasons:

    1) Allows you to work on a restricted range of values when entering values.

    E.g. you could use limit to restrict note entry to one octave say.

    2) To clamp values to a minimum or maximum value. This could be used to

    change the values of those controls outside of the upper and lower to be that

    of the upper or lower limit. Effectively this flattens a curve at the top and/or

    bottom.

    Every effort has been made to ensure limits work with other controls (e.g.

    randomize, reset, autolink, draw etc), but they cannot be saved. They are

    automatically reset if you load in another snapshot. This is because limits are

    designed for data entry and could corrupt(by clamping) your sequence

    unintentionally.

    You can reset all the limits to default values with a button in the Controller

    panel.

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    Here is the Limit Panel that pops open when you press the Limit Button. The

    upper and lower values are bound to the opposite value (i.e. lower can’t be

    higher than upper & v.v) – they will turn yellow to indicate this.

    Auto-Link

    Will link all controls, so that moving one will attempt to move the others.

    Linked controls will enforce limits (max or min) or the upper or lower values

    (e.g. 0 or 127 for velocity). For notes with a key scale, the movement may be

    further adjusted by conforming to the scale, or the upper/lower limit of the

    scale.

    With v1.11, this link button can be set independently for each type of control

    show– i.e. different for Note, Velocity, Gate, Channel, CC1..16 A or B (as a

    group), %Probability, Humanise controls, or Swing.

    This setting is not saved with a snapshot.

    Lock controls

    When you have finished designing your steps, you may want to lock them to

    prevent them being accidently moved with a touch. This lock button will lock

    all movement of the sliders until you unlock again.

    You can still use the increment/decrement buttons at the extreme ends of the

    slider, or reload a bank.

    It can be used to good effect with the audition button (touching a control to

    ‘play’ it even whilst the sequencer is playing), as it means you can setup a nice

    set of notes (which could even be outside of the playing sequence), and play

    these along with your sequence.

    This setting is not saved with a snapshot.

    Draw Controls

    If this button is enabled (it will toggle both linked & locked controls button to

    off), any touch and move in the fader section will snap the controls to your

    finger position.

    Like Linked Controls, max & min clamping (including limits) applies.

    If the Settings is also set for animate controls, the controls will be moved

    smoothly to their position

    Random Button

    This button enables to you randomize the 16 controls. It has options for

    randomizing full or selected range, or ramp up/down.

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    Randomise full range

    Will use the full range of the sliders to produce a random value.

    o Note : This will also be in-scale (if not chromatic) and therefore may not

    be the lowest or highest notes if not in the current scale.

    o The upper & lower values may be different if Limits apply.

    o Velocity : 0 to 127

    o Gate% : 1 to 400

    o Channel : 1 to 16

    o CC1 ..16 (A or B): 0 to 127

    o %Probability : 0 to 100

    o %Swing : 0 to 50

    o %Humanise : 0 to 100

    o Humanise note : 0 to 127

    o Humanise velocity : 0 to 127

    Randomise within min/max

    As full range, but first works out the maximum and minimum values, all

    random values will be contained within that range. Use this to keep a sequence

    (melody) in a register (bass for example).

    Note: This is really random – so very high notes, or very low notes may not

    sound in your synth.

    Limits (upper & lower) also apply for randomising

    Ramp up

    Will produce incrementing steps from 0 to max.

    Ramp down

    Will produce decrementing steps from max to 0.

    Note: A useful tip is to use linked controls to squash the melody & place it in the

    register you want. Then use Randomise within min/max to produce random

    notes within this band.

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    Tempo Section

    Fig 4. Tempo Controls and pop ups

    Tempo is the speed at which the sequencer plays each step and is measured as BPM

    (Beats per Minute) with each step being a 16th note. So at 60 BPM, 4 steps will play

    per second, whereas at 1020 BPM you would get 68 steps per second.

    MS can run using an internal clock (MASTER) or use incoming midi clock

    signals (SLAVE), and send/receive midi Start/Stop messages

    The normal range of the Tempo is 0 (stopped) to 255, but this can be extended

    by using the green clock multiplier button which extends this to 1020 BPM(x4).

    Note: When changing the multiplier, MS will try to keep the same tempo and

    adjust the knob position accordingly.

    You can change the tempo by dragging the slider left or right, or using the

    increment/decrement buttons.

    Note: the minimum tempo you can get by dragging/decrementing is 1 – this is to

    avoid accidently stopping the sequencer when dealing with low tempos. The Stop

    button will set this to 0 however.

    Clicking the clock multiplier button shows the 4 multipliers you can pick for tempo:

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    Therefore the range of tempos available for each multiplier is:

    Clock

    Multiplier

    Range Increments Description

    X1/4 1,2,3..63 ¼

    Lowest multiplier to allow finer

    control at slow tempos. Shown to 2

    dp.

    X1/3 1,2,3..84 1/3 All tempos from 1 to 84. Shown to

    2 dp.

    X1/2 1,2,3..127 1/2 All tempos from 1 to 127. Shown to

    2 dp.

    X1 1,2,3..255 1 All integer tempos from 1 to 255

    X2 2,4,6,8..510 2

    Doubles the max, but only even

    integer tempo values (unless using

    the number keypad)

    X3 3,6,9,12..765 3

    Triples the max, but some integer

    values not represented on the

    slider.

    X4 4,8,12,16..1020 4 Quadruples the max. Used for high

    speeds effects. Integer only.

    At a tempo of zero, the sequencer is stopped – from v1.6 a tempo of 1 is now

    the lowest – just press the Play button to stop. The maximum tempo of 1020 is the

    fastest operating speed and well beyond most software/hardware tempo rates

    available/ Note: it is possible to go higher than 1020 by using NoteTime and the

    gate%

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    For clock multipliers less than x1 (1/3, ½ or ¼) the tempo is shown to 2

    decimal places.

    If the Sequencer is placed into SLAVE mode (Options Panel setting), then the

    Tempo section changes to hide the slide and disable the buttons

    Fig 5. Tempo Controls (SLAVE)

    The tempo is then taken from the incoming midi clock messages, so the tempo

    knob and the clock multiplier are removed. If the Tempo is shown as WAIT, this

    means that the sequencer is waiting for midi clock messages it uses to calculate

    BPM. When these are received it will calculate the BPM as best it can.

    The tempo can be saved & restored in snapshots if ‘included controls’ is selected.

    New to v1.6 you can now use a keypad entry to set the tempo – this is the Set button

    just above the red tempo led. Use this to jump to precise tempos (even ones not

    obtainable because of x2 or greater clock multiples).

    Only integer tempos are allowed here.

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    Transpose Section

    Fig 6. Transpose Controls

    Transposition allows you to move the whole sequence of steps (your melody) up or

    down semitones – much like playing in a different key on the piano. This does not

    alter the note slider positions, but is applied to the note slider pitch (after invert &

    humanize).

    This section allows you to control the amount of transposition (0 meaning none) in

    the range -36 to +36 semitones. This only affects the midi note sent to the output

    device and not the slider values shown (which may be key scaled also). Transposed

    notes are never taken out of their midi value range (0 to 127) so will be clamped.

    Ornaments and chord/added notes are also transposed.

    The final midi note played to the output is:

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    Step note value => Inversion Key => Humanise Note => Transpose =>

    Conform to scale

    Additionally, this transposition can be delayed, if the Cycle button is enabled, until

    the next cycle reset. The transpose slider will then be sampled at the next cycle reset

    (when the Cycle LED is lit) and applied to all steps until sampled again at the next

    cycle reset. This is an effective way to introduce key changes and allow you enough

    time (assuming reasonable tempos!) to ‘play’ the transpose control & pick the next

    shift.

    Double tapping the transpose slider or clicking the set button pops open the

    Transpose Panel. This panel can be dragged in the control area as it remains open to

    allow you to interact with the sequencer (like Skip button panel).

    Pick the transpose from -24 to +24 range, and the transpose slider will move to that

    value.

    The Transpose can be saved & restored in snapshots if ‘included controls’ is selected.

    The Transport Controls Consists of three buttons :

    rotate sequence backwards 1 step

    o This rotates the sequence backwards (step 1 becomes 16, step 2

    becomes 1, etc and step 16 becomes 15). This has an effect on step 1 &

    16 being automatic cycle reset points.

    o Use this to line up a sequence during design (e.g. you don’t want steps

    1..4, so shift left 4 to make steps 5+ steps 1,2, etc.)

    Play/Stop (changes from |> to [])

    If the sequencer has stopped it will display the triangular Play button. If

    it is playing, it will display the square.

    o In Master mode, this starts the sequencer if currently stopped or stops

    it is currently playing.

    o If Cycle mode is on and you press stop (shown as a [] button), it will

    carry on until the next cycle reset. It may be possible that your

    sequence is not cycle resetting – the setting for cycle reset on jump is

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    off and you have a sub-sequence of jumps, in which case disable the

    cycle first.

    o An ornament Stop exists (red hand icon) will automatically stop the

    sequencer when that step has played.

    o In SLAVE mode, the sequencer will only start or stop when receiving

    a midi clock message start (or continue) and stop. Make sure you have

    you midi inputs enabled for clock receive!

    o It is possible to midi learn the start/stop button - the CC learnt data

    is 0 for stop (if currently playing), anything else for start (if not

    currently playing).

    rotate sequence forwards 1 step

    o This rotates the sequence forwards (step 1 becomes 2, step 2 becomes

    3, etc and step 16 becomes 1)

    The Logic Controls Consists of two buttons :

    Loop Type

    Use this button to cycle through the sequencer loop type (Forward, Reverse,

    Bounce, Bounce* and Random).

    o Forward – will play steps increasing step order 1,2,3 etc up to 16, then

    return to 1. It may be asked to jump out of sequence but will try to

    continue forward after the jump.

    o Reverse – will play in decreasing step order 16,15,14 down to 1, then

    jump to 16,15 etc. A jump out of sequence will try and continue in reverse

    after the jump.

    o Bounce – will alternatively play forward then reverse, changing direction

    at steps 1 & 16. Any jumps out of sequence will try and maintain the

    current direction. Steps 1 & 16 are only played once (e.g.

    1,..15,16,15,14..1,2,3,…)

    o Bounce* - like Bounce, but plays steps 1 & 16 twice. E.g.

    1,2,..16,16,15,…2,1,1,2,3….)

    o Random – will play the steps in a random order – all steps are the same.

    Cycle Button:

    o If shown as Red, indicates the sequencer is operating in Cycle mode. This

    is where values changed (e.g. midi note on a step, or transpose) are not

    applied until the cycle resets (indicated by LED flashing).

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    Show Buttons

    This section shows 5 buttons(plus two smaller for A & B) laid out as a grid.

    Only one of these may be selected (highlighted label shows as yellow) at one

    time.

    Pressing one of these buttons will quickly update the central step controls to

    show the corresponding settings for Notes, Velocity, Gate%, Midi Channel,

    Midi control 1..16 (with a choice of A or B).

    The A & B are only enabled if you select the larger CC button and then only if

    that CC is defined as two byte (see CC panel).

    Also used are show are the %probability,%swing,

    %Humanise/HumaniseNote/HumaniseVel.

    Invert Key This control inverts the step notes, reflecting them around a user settable key.

    Invert off. Notes play as described by slider (and transpositions etc)

    Invert on. Notes from slider are reflected around invert key, before being transposed etc.

    Click the button to open the Invert Key panel, which allows you to pick the key

    (enharmonic naming):

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    o On/Off : Enable/disable the inversion

    o Invert Key Note : use the rotary to pick the note.

    o X : exit without making a change & close the panel.

    o Def : reset to default (off & C-2)

    o Tick : accept the change & close the panel.

    Function:

    This does not modify the step notes and only transforms the played note

    when playing, so you can enable this without losing your note sequence.

    Any notes higher than the invert key note (z) by x semitones are

    altered to be x semitones below z (i.e. z-x).

    Any notes lower than the invert key note (z) by x semitones are

    altered to be x semitones above z (i.e. z+x).

    In all cases notes are limited to the midi byte range 0 to 127.

    When playing a note, inversion is done first. The exact order is:

    Step note defined by slider

    Inversion around key note (if enabled)

    Humanise note by +/- random amount up to humanize note

    range (if %humanise chance met).

    Sequence transpose (the transpose slider)

    Apply music scale (if non-chromatic note and not chromatic

    scale)

    Ornament altering (e.g. appoggiatura plays a higher note first

    before playing the note).

    FX transforms

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    o Limiter may cap the min/max range of the notes, and

    optionally apply a music scale to it (if not chromatic

    step)

    o Filter, may ignore the step note altogether if the note is

    in an active range.

    o Transpose – for notes in a min/max range, can alter

    the pitch of all step notes +/-127, and apply to music

    scale afterwards (if not chromatic step)

    o Remap – could modify the note in a min/max range to

    one value. No music scale applies (as you pick the new

    note yourself)

    In all cases a note pitch 127 will not sound.

    Record button

    Record In Disabled

    Record In Enabled

    This button must be enabled if you want to record anything into MS (e.g.

    notes).

    If MS is loaded into Audiobus, it can be toggled by another app using the AB

    mini-control.

    Note that the Options Panel settings for Notes/Vel/Channel/CC/CC32 &

    record midi channel apply to additionally filter out input.

    Reset button

    Resets the currently shown controls to their default values. Many options can

    be choosen, from individual clears to whole sequencer resets.

    Depending on which one is currently selected: Notes reset to C3, Velocity to

    127, midi gate % to 50%. Midi Channel to 1, Midi CC’s 1..16 A & B to zero,

    %probability to 100%, %swing to 0%, %Humanise (%chance, note & vel) all to

    0.

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    Midi section

  • 39

    The bottom right of the main sequencer screen contains information about

    midi input & output.

    Midi Send/Mute button

    The button will be coloured yellow (and say Midi Send) if midi output is

    enabled, and gray (Midi Muted) if disabled.

    Use this to quickly mute all midi output.

    It can also be set using Audiobus mini-controls.

    There is a delay when midiSequencer starts (it’s not enabled at the start) to

    check there are any devices. If you can’t enable it, go into Devices panel and

    refresh.

    Midi In LED

    This will flash when midi in is received (note, cc, midi thru, etc but not midi

    clock as that occurs too fast or during midi learn).

    Final note output

    Will show the note being output (after transpose etc)

    Panic button

    This will send a note off for all notes (0..127) on any active channel (i.e. all

    channels between min & max channel). It will also send a CC123 (all notes

    off) to every channel. It sends this to all active output channels.

    Audition button

    Turns midiSequencer into a realtime controller! By touching some controls,

    it will immediately play that step to all output devices (i.e. just like the

    sequencer does – including fx, but here you can do it just by touching).

    There are three types of touch recognized in IOS : touch begin, touch move

    & touch end, these are auctioned differently for some control types.

    o CC – will send the CC only when you touch begin and when you move.

    o All others Note, Vel, Gate%, Channel only send the step when you

    touch begin

    The Audition button then has three purposes:

    o As part of design, allows you to setup a sequence by hearing the note,

    velocity/length & channel.

    o Allows you to play over a sequence currently playing. So it works also

    whilst the sequencer is playing steps, and you can use this to good

    effect by say, setting aside steps just to play live.

    o Turns midiSequencer into a realtime 16 lane controller (if you use

    CC’s) – so could send sysex, NRPN, Aftertouch or continuous

    controller messages at a single touch.

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    Skip (or Step Option) Button

    The skip button makes available many features of a step , but mainly allows for rhythm variation within a sequence. It was first called skip button because it just handled play logic, but now it does more.

    The skip button can be used to good effect when the sequencer is playing as you can keep the panel open and reselect different steps, so modifying the sequence on the fly. It supports:

    Muting (x or Rx)

    Play logic : choosing the next step to play (Jump to numbered step)

    Cycle resets (R & Rx)

    Repeating steps(x2 up to x8)

    Ornamentation (e.g. latching)

    Chromatic notes

    Access chord & added note Panel for this step Latching

    Enable/Disable individual fx slots

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    Previous/Next step:

    Use these buttons to cycle through the 16 steps whilst keeping the panel open.

    Muting:

    An ‘x’ on the step button indicates that it should not be played (no midi output). In Step-Time, this is equivalent to a rest on a music score as the step is effectively silenced for the regular step interval, but does not affect the next step. In Note-Time, this is the same as a skip as the note step is ignored completely and the sequencer will immediately jump to play the next step. Note: The new mute button, shown in the main screen is now the same as x.

    Play Logic:

    Plays this note as a midi-on message, followed by a midi-off message after a period defined by the tempo and the gate % setting (varied for ornamented notes/chords). The logic applies to what it does next, as normally (for a blank skip button) it just plays the next step in the sequence. Sequences can also change direction depending upon the Loop type (e.g. Bounce* plays the end notes twice). The following types of logic apply (more will be added in the future):

    Play next step

    Skip the next step

    Reset to the first/last (numerical) step in the sequence

    Repeat the current step (up to 8 times)

    Jump to numbered step (does not cycle reset)

    Stop sequence

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    Fig 10. Step logic

    Cycle Resets:

    Cycle resets are important when the Cycle button is lit and there are pending

    changes (which MS delays until this cycle reset time).

    Although a cycle resets normally at step 16(1 if reversed), there are two skip

    button types that trigger a cycle reset at other steps (after playing the note or reset):

    Reset after playing the note

    Reset after playing the muted note (i.e. silence)

    The loop type also alters the behavior:

    Forward : Resets to the first numerical playable (incl. muted) note from

    step 1, and triggers a cycle reset.

    Reverse : Resets to the last numerical playable (incl. muted) note from

    step 16.

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    Bounce : After playing the note, even muted, will reverse the direction.

    You could have one, or two, R’s (or Rx’s) in a sequence to shorten it to a

    smaller sequence.

    Bounce* : As Bounce, only repeats the R or Rx note before reversing the

    direction.

    Random : The reset has no effect and either acts as a blank (for R) or a

    mute (for Rx), this is because random notes have no cycle.

    Ornamentation Rather than play just a string of single notes for the duration of the gated

    interval (see What is Time), ornamentation adds additional notes within the same

    time interval by breaking the step note into smaller steps, yet keeping the overall

    duration.

    Note : This is a great way to create rhythmic variation in your sequence whilst

    maintaining the overall rhythm. Traditionally, ornaments were used as a form of

    decoration, and MS can disable them all easily (Performance Panel).

    Ornaments, because they introduce additional notes within the same step

    duration, are often only effective at lower tempo (e.g.

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    Ornament Skip Button Description

    Mordent

    This is actually an inverted mordent. Three

    notes are played instead of the single one. The

    middle note is a semitone lower than the step.

    The note durations are ¼,¼ and ½ of the step

    duration. Note this is multiplied by gate %!

    Appoggiatura

    The appoggiatura plays two notes rather than a

    single one. The first note is a semitone above

    the step note.

    The note durations are ½ and ½ of the step

    duration. Note this is multiplied by gate %!

    2 note

    Tremolo

    This short tremolo plays two notes in the same

    time interval – the 2nd is played an octave

    above the step note.

    This type of ornament is good to combine with

    other ornaments. Another use is to create a

    digital delay effect as the notes can fill in a

    rhythm.

    The note durations are ½ and ½ of the step

    duration. Note this is multiplied by gate %!

    Duple

    The duple ratchet plays two notes rather than a

    single one. All notes are the same pitch &

    duration.

    The note durations are 1/2 of the step duration.

    Note this is multiplied by gate %!

    Triplet

    The triple ratchet plays three notes rather

    than a single one. All notes are the same pitch

    & duration.

    The note durations are 1/3 of the step duration.

    Note this is multiplied by gate %!

    The effect of this is called ratcheting in

    electronic music and was introduced by

    Tangerine Dream’s Chris Franke.

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    Quad

    The quad ratchet plays four notes rather than

    a single one. All notes are the same pitch &

    duration.

    The note durations are ¼ of the step duration.

    Note this is multiplied by gate %!

    Quin

    The quin ratchet plays five notes rather than a

    single one. All notes are the same pitch &

    duration.

    The note durations are 1/5 of the step duration.

    Note this is multiplied by gate %!

    Six

    The six ratchet plays six notes rather than a

    single one. All notes are the same pitch &

    duration.

    The note durations are 1/6 of the step

    duration. Note this is multiplied by gate %!

    X2 to X8

    Repeats the step up to 7 times more. Each step

    plays for the full interval x gate%. The repeat

    includes ornamentation and chord/added

    notes.

    If muted, the whole step is a rest.

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    Options Panel The options panel can be invoked by pressing the ‘Options’ button at the top of

    the main sequencer screen. Use it to set your MS preferences. They are saved to disk

    when you exit this panel and recalled when you next start the app.

    Fig 12. Option Controls

    Note: All rotaries will now follow your touch. There is a snap point to make it

    easier to pick zero or full values (i.e. the rotaries are not fully 360 degrees).

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    Note: Background midi has been removed as midiSequencer is designed to run in

    the background.

    The Options available are:

    WIST

    Values : On or Off

    This is Korg’s wireless start protocol which enables you to send a start message

    to another WIST enabled app (e.g. Gadget or iMS20) when connected.

    Clicking on, will attempt to discover other WIST devices that are available. In

    practice this is abit hit and miss. The first app to enable WIST is considered

    the Master, any app connected after the Master is the Slave.

    MS will send start/stop signals if the master and listen to stop/start if the

    slave.

    Please refer to the info button (small ? button) to refer to the documents on

    this.

    Tempo Master/Slave

    Values : Master or Slave

    If set to the default MASTER, then the sequencer will use an internal clock to

    run the sequencer. The tempo controls are enabled and you have control of the

    speed of playback.

    In SLAVE mode, sequencer will use midi in clock messages to run the

    sequencer. If you want to sync the playback speed to an external DAW (e.g.

    Ableton Live) or external hardware then use this setting, but remember to

    enable midi clock in this panel & input devices too.

    Midi Clock

    Values : On or Off or Off X(disabled)

    You would want to send midi clock messages to destinations if you need to use

    this sequencer’s tempo as a master to other devices.

    This control is disabled ( ) if tempo is SLAVE as incoming midi clock

    messages control the tempo.

    If On, will send 6 midi clock message signals per step to the output

    destinations. This means 24 clocks per beat as MS has a 4 step beat.

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    The default value is Off and I suggest not setting this unless required to sync

    other apps to midiSequencer and it will ‘clutter’ the midi stream.

    Midi Clock Rotary

    Values : 1/1,1/2,1/2T,1/2D,..1/32D,2/1…32/1

    This rotary is used to change the rate of the midi clock output to all active midi

    device endpoints that have clock enabled.

    1/x : faster by x

    1/xT : faster by 3x/2 – i.e. triplets in the time of two.

    1/xD : faster by 2x/3 – i.e. two in the time of three.

    x/1 : slower by 1/x – e.g. 2/1 is half as slow.

    The 1/x has x=1,2,4,8,16,32 divisions. The x/1 has x=1,2,3,4,8,16,32.

    Why would this be useful? Well the echo fx has it’s own time divisions (which

    work inversely the same as this). This would enable you to have a step time of 1

    (say 15 bpm = 1 step per second), and echoes playing ½ (30BPM = 2 echoes

    per secong) and then you could have a midi clock output to another device (e.g.

    drum synth) set to 2/1 to make the clock run also at 30 BPM(2 drum steps per

    second).

    Note: As midiBus only has one midi clock, it is not possible to have multiple

    clock bpms, so run at the fastes rate you need and divide if needs be in your

    external equipment.

    You would want to send midi clock messages to Output Latency

    Values : 0 to 1000 milliseconds

    This adds latency (delay) to all outgoing midi messages – by adding to the midi

    timestamps. A value of 120ms is default, but for faster devices 0ms is ok.

    Note : this is in addition to individual output device latencies

    Record Options Note/Vel/Gate/Ch/CC/CC32

    Values : On or Off or Off X(disabled)

    These buttons allow you to include/exclude certain parts of the midi note on

    data when recording midi. This would be useful when you want to record just a

    small part of the message (e.g. just the note & velocity) without altering

    current values for the other settings (e.g. gate/channel/cc).

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    You can only record incoming midi information if the Record mode button is enabled on the main screen.

    Gate recording (i.e. length of note) is permanently disabled. It may be added at a later date.

    Note: The recording may also be blocked if the record channel is not set

    correctly (see below in this section).

    Note: if you disable Note but enable Velocity, you still need to send a midi

    note to MS to be able to record – it is the midi note on message that triggers

    the record (so velocity, channel & CCs last received are used).

    Note : If lit, will record midi note into the step from the midi note received on

    the recording channel. If not, will ignore changing the step’s note value.

    Vel : If lit, will record velocity from the midi note on velocity into the step.

    Ch : If lit, will use the midi note on channel to set the steps channel.

    CC : If lit, will record up to 16 midi CC values – if midi CC messages have been

    received for any of the currently set controllers (see below). So, incoming midi

    is matched to the CC setup in the Controller Panel. This includes all types of

    CC (CC,NRPN,RPN,Prog change, Aftertouch, PitchBend) but not sysex.

    CC32 : If lit, will use any midi CC32 message received to load in a snapshot.

    This does mean CC32 can still be recorded into a step, but should be reserved

    for loading.

    Record Midi Ch.

    Values : Rotary (0=Omni, 1 to 16)

    Allows you to select only one midi channel to record midi note-on messages

    (including CC), unless set to Omni, in which case all channels are used.

    This would be useful for a multi-midi channel setup where you want to record

    midi from say a single keyboard with a specific midi output channel. You could

    dedicate a keyboard then for the purpose of recording.

    The default is OMNI.

    Playback Options

    This is a global setting that enables/disables all note, CC or Fx(notes).

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    With Note disabled, no step notes are sent to the output devices. If enabled,

    then this can also be disabled per output device.

    With CC disabled, no controller messages (CC, NRPN, RPN etc) are sent to

    output devices. Like notes, this can be disabled per output device.

    With FX disabled, no additional fx notes are sent to output devices. Fx notes

    are currently generated just for echo and ostinato. Like notes, this can be

    disabled per output device.

    So, ignoring per device for the sake of clarity and CC’s, it is possible to have the

    following types of output:

    Note + FX – output devices are sent step notes(midi on+off)+fx(midi on/offs)

    Note + no FX – output devices are sent just the step notes(midi on+off)

    No Note + no FX – output devices are sent just the CC’s if enabled.

    So this is a quick way of disabling steps (to hear just fx), fx additional notes(to

    hear just fx notes) and CC’s(e.g. to stop synth modulations)

    To use this more creatively, you would normally leave these on and set per

    device. For example, you could set one device to just receive step notes and

    another to just receive fx notes.

    Swing Odd/Even

    This allows swing controls to be applied on Odd steps (1,3,5,7,9,11,13,15) as

    well as the even ones (2,4,6,8,10,12,14,16). So in effect, swing on all steps.

    Swing is the effect of adding a delay in the step, which gives a dotted note feel

    to the rhythm (skipping effect if applied to just even steps). MS allows the

    amount of swing to be set per step, so you could use this for interesting

    rhythms (i.e. to alter the start of the note) and gate% to alter the length (and

    therefore the end) of the note.

    Leave this off to apply to just even steps.

    Scale after Transpose

    When choosing a key scale (e.g. C major), certain notes are chromatic in that

    they don’t fit in the scale (e.g. Db). A key scale exists as a set of fixed intervals

    from the root note (e.g 3rd step of a C major is E), but if the whole sequence is

    transposed (say down 1 semitone) the notes may no longer fit the scale (e.g. D

    becomes Db which is not in C Major).

    With this option Scale after Transpose, MS will adjust the step note, after it is

    transposed, to fit the key scale, ensuring that no note is generated that is

    outside of the key (assuming the step isn’t marked as chromatic that is).

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    However, if you link all notes and move them down one semitone say, this will

    destroy the relative chromatic intervals (the semitone difference) between one

    step and another, so set the Scale after Transpose to off to keep this relative

    interval between steps intact.

    You can toggle it on/off at will, so may want to toggle off just for linked

    movement, but turn on again if you use the transpose slider say.

    Previous versions of MS had this always ON.

    KeyScale/Launch/Step & Note Time Buttons The top right of the screen contains four buttons and the exit.

    Midi Learn button:

    Use this to enable midi in of controller messages to set automation on

    certain controls (e.g. step 2 notes or tempo). These controls can also be

    set manually. See the section on Midi Learn for more details.

    KeyScale button:

    This enables you to conform the pitches of the notes that MS plays to a

    music scale (e.g. G minor). It is possible to still use notes outside of the

    scale if you make the step chromatic. See the Keyscale section below for a

    description.

    Launch button:

    This is a duplicate of the launch button found on the devices panel. It is

    grayed out until you use it in that panel, then it will be available on the

    front panel too.

    StepTime/NoteTime button:

    This important button determines the sequencer timing logic. The

    default is step time, where an internal timer (tempo or bpm) is used to

    determine the rate steps are played. Note time just plays legato (no gap

    after one step plays to the next starts).

    If set to Step-Time (default value), then every step is exactly the same

    length (determined by tempo). The gate % only determines how long

    after the note-on is played does the note-off get sent. This is like staccato

    – which you can hear if you make the gate% short, although you can

    make it longer that the step (400% = 4 steps long).

    If set to Note-Time, then every step is played for a period defined by the

    tempo and the step’s gate%, and immediately the note-off plays, then the

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    next step’s note-on plays. So there is no gap between note-off and note-

    on and the sequencer is effectively playing legato style.

    Note: From v1.6, you can now toggle this during play, but the timing of the note about to play may be undesirable.

    Key Scale Panel Midi defines notes in semitones – which in musical terms represent a

    chromatic scale. But there are music scales where not all notes are used (e.g. C

    major does not use the black keys on a keyboard).

    MS currently allows all Major, Minor, Pentatonic (Maj or Min) and the two

    Wholetone (C,C#) scales. This works by mapping those notes not in a scale to

    ones that do – the closest lowest note in the scale. So for C major, the C#/Db

    key is altered to C, one semitone lower.

    The effect of this is to create a much more musical sequence than would be

    obtained by using all 12 tones, and MS is designed for you to use as a

    composition tool to find melodies.

    This conforming of a step note to the scale operates on the main controls and

    includes transposition and ornamentation. It is even represented for chords.

    Click the round Treble clef button at the top of the MS screen, and the Key

    Scale panel will open.

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    Exit button – closes this panel without changing the key

    Pick button – once you have selected your key using the other buttons, select

    the Pick button to apply this choice to your sequence. The display (under the

    Analog Midi Sequencer label on the main screen) will change to show the new

    key and the notes in that scale (enharmonic spellings).

    Scale Type buttons – select the type of scale you want.

    The chromatic scale has no root note, so the root buttons will be disabled.

    There are only two wholetone scales, represented by C or C#(or Db).

    # button – will alter the round root note buttons to show sharps rather than

    flats.

    b button – will alter the round root note buttons to show flats rather than

    sharps.

    With scales you will also find the extreme ranges (midi lowest = 0

    highest=127) also restricted from selection. E.g. D major will only allow the

    slider control to go down to C#-2 rather than C-2. Same applies for the highest

    note (midi 127=G8) which may be restricted to a lower note (126 for F#). This

    is all managed for you by MS.

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    Chromatic steps

    You don’t always want step notes to be restricted by scale, so they can be

    indicated as being non-scale notes by selecting the Chromatic button in the

    Skip Button Panel. These steps will show their labels in yellow (rather than the

    usual white) for easy identification. You can then pick any semitone you want

    whilst maintaining scale conforming for other non-chromatic steps.

    Key scale is also saved in snapshots (not as an included control so always

    saved/restored with step data) so you could load in different keys using the

    performance panel for example.

    When you pick a scale, all steps (not indicated as chromatic) will be conformed

    (moved to the lowest closest scale step). This does mean that C3 will be moved

    to B2 if you move from Chromatic to D Major for example, as C is not a scale

    note in D Maj.

    When you draw, increment/decrement, double tap and move linked steps,

    non-chromatic steps will conform.

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    Settings

    IOS has a settings app where many apps have options that you want to set by default. You need to set these before running the app!

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    Locate midiSequencer in the list. The slider button is green if option enabled, white

    if not. The picture above is my normal settings.

    The settings are: