Interstate Commerce. What Constitutes Interstate Commerce. Intrastate Junction Railway Handling Cars for Interstate Shipment

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<ul><li><p>Interstate Commerce. What Constitutes Interstate Commerce. Intrastate Junction RailwayHandling Cars for Interstate ShipmentSource: Harvard Law Review, Vol. 25, No. 8 (Jun., 1912), p. 741Published by: The Harvard Law Review AssociationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1324041 .Accessed: 19/05/2014 02:47</p><p>Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms &amp; Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p> .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.</p><p> .</p><p>The Harvard Law Review Association is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access toHarvard Law Review.</p><p>http://www.jstor.org </p><p>This content downloaded from 194.29.185.178 on Mon, 19 May 2014 02:47:52 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=harvardlawhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/1324041?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>RECENT CASES. RECENT CASES. RECENT CASES. </p><p>Liability Act. Behrens v. Illinois Central R. Co., I92 Fed. 581 (Dist. Ct., E. D. La.). </p><p>The court feels that the fact that the usual and ordinary employment of the decedent included interstate commerce gave him a status of one engaged in interstate commerce and so kept him continuously under the protection of the federal act. Another court has said, however, that an employee might well be subject to the act while engaged in interstate but not while engaged in intrastate commerce. See Colasurdo v. Central R. of New Jersey, i8o Fed. 832, 837. The few cases under the act seem to rest its applicability upon the character of the work in which the employee was engaged when injured. Zikos v. Oregon R. &amp;? Navigation Co., I79 Fed. 893; Taylor v. Southern Ry. Co., I78 Fed. 380. The recent decision of the Supreme Court, in holding that it is not essential that the train doing the injury should be interstate, seems to look merely to the work of the injured employee. Second Employers' Liability Cases, 32 Sup. Ct. I69. The Act of 1906 was declared unconstitutional be- cause it applied to intrastate employees. Employers' Liability Cases, 207 U. S. 463, 28 Sup. Ct. I4I. The construction maintained in the principal case would bring the scope of the present act extremely close to that of its predecessor. </p><p>INTERSTATE COMMERCE - WHAT CONSTITUTES INTERSTATE COMMERCE - </p><p>INTRASTATE JUNCTION RAILWAY HANDLING CARS FOR INTERSTATE SHIPMENT. - A short railway, wholly within a state, switched with its own motive power on through bills of lading interstate carload freight from one trunk line to another, and from the trunk lines to the consignee's sidings. The trunk lines paid the railway by the car. Held, that the railway is subject to the provisions of the Interstate Commerce Act. United States ex rel. Attorney General v. Union Stockyard &amp;P Transit Co., 192 Fed. 330 (Commerce Ct.). </p><p>A shipment is interstate if the shipper intends a single consignment from one state to another. Cutting v. Florida Ry. &amp;e Navigation Co., 46 Fed. 641. See 20 HARV. L. REV. 652. That one of the connecting carriers participating is wholly within one state does not relieve it from interstate obligations. The Daniel Ball, io Wall. (U. S.) 557; Norfolk and Western R. Co. v. Pennsylvania, I36 U. S. II4, 10 Sup. Ct. 958. This is true even though local bills of lading are issued for the shipment. Houston Direct Navigation Co. v. Ins. Co. of North America, 89 Tex. I, 32 S. W. 889; Texas &amp;o Pacific Ry. Co. v. Railroad Commission of Louisiana, I83 Fed. I00oo5. But cf. United States ex rel. Inter- state Commerce Commission v. Chicago, etc. R. Co., 8I Fed. 783. Intrastate terminal companies handling interstate trains are within the act. Southern Pacific Terminal Co. v. Interstate Commerce Commission, 219 U. S. 498, 31 Sup. Ct. 279. Upon facts substantially similar to those in the principal case the federal Safety Appliance Act has been held applicable. Union Stock Yards Co. v. United States, I69 Fed. 404; Belt Ry. Co. v. United States, i68 Fed. 542. It has been suggested that that act is to be construed more broadly, because it regulates, not business, but mechanical instrumentalities with a view to the safety of workmen. See United States v. Colorado &amp; N. W. R. Co., 157 Fed. 321, 330. And before the amendment of i906 the Commerce Act was thought to apply to a railroad within a state only when it handled inter- state shipments under a common arrangement for continuous carriage. United States v. Geddes, 131 Fed. 452; Cincinnati, etc. Ry. Co. v. Interstate Commerce Commission, 162 U. S. 184, I6 Sup. Ct. 700. The amendment makes the two acts define interstate railroads in the same terms. The principal case gives them a similar scope. </p><p>PARTNERSHIP -RIGHTS, DUTIES, AND LIABILITIES OF PARTNERS INTER SE - RIGHT OF PARTNER TO MAINTAIN TROVER FOR UNAUTHORIZED SALE </p><p>Liability Act. Behrens v. Illinois Central R. Co., I92 Fed. 581 (Dist. Ct., E. D. La.). </p><p>The court feels that the fact that the usual and ordinary employment of the decedent included interstate commerce gave him a status of one engaged in interstate commerce and so kept him continuously under the protection of the federal act. Another court has said, however, that an employee might well be subject to the act while engaged in interstate but not while engaged in intrastate commerce. See Colasurdo v. Central R. of New Jersey, i8o Fed. 832, 837. The few cases under the act seem to rest its applicability upon the character of the work in which the employee was engaged when injured. Zikos v. Oregon R. &amp;? Navigation Co., I79 Fed. 893; Taylor v. Southern Ry. Co., I78 Fed. 380. The recent decision of the Supreme Court, in holding that it is not essential that the train doing the injury should be interstate, seems to look merely to the work of the injured employee. Second Employers' Liability Cases, 32 Sup. Ct. I69. The Act of 1906 was declared unconstitutional be- cause it applied to intrastate employees. Employers' Liability Cases, 207 U. S. 463, 28 Sup. Ct. I4I. The construction maintained in the principal case would bring the scope of the present act extremely close to that of its predecessor. </p><p>INTERSTATE COMMERCE - WHAT CONSTITUTES INTERSTATE COMMERCE - </p><p>INTRASTATE JUNCTION RAILWAY HANDLING CARS FOR INTERSTATE SHIPMENT. - A short railway, wholly within a state, switched with its own motive power on through bills of lading interstate carload freight from one trunk line to another, and from the trunk lines to the consignee's sidings. The trunk lines paid the railway by the car. Held, that the railway is subject to the provisions of the Interstate Commerce Act. United States ex rel. Attorney General v. Union Stockyard &amp;P Transit Co., 192 Fed. 330 (Commerce Ct.). </p><p>A shipment is interstate if the shipper intends a single consignment from one state to another. Cutting v. Florida Ry. &amp;e Navigation Co., 46 Fed. 641. See 20 HARV. L. REV. 652. That one of the connecting carriers participating is wholly within one state does not relieve it from interstate obligations. The Daniel Ball, io Wall. (U. S.) 557; Norfolk and Western R. Co. v. Pennsylvania, I36 U. S. II4, 10 Sup. Ct. 958. This is true even though local bills of lading are issued for the shipment. Houston Direct Navigation Co. v. Ins. Co. of North America, 89 Tex. I, 32 S. W. 889; Texas &amp;o Pacific Ry. Co. v. Railroad Commission of Louisiana, I83 Fed. I00oo5. But cf. United States ex rel. Inter- state Commerce Commission v. Chicago, etc. R. Co., 8I Fed. 783. Intrastate terminal companies handling interstate trains are within the act. Southern Pacific Terminal Co. v. Interstate Commerce Commission, 219 U. S. 498, 31 Sup. Ct. 279. Upon facts substantially similar to those in the principal case the federal Safety Appliance Act has been held applicable. Union Stock Yards Co. v. United States, I69 Fed. 404; Belt Ry. Co. v. United States, i68 Fed. 542. It has been suggested that that act is to be construed more broadly, because it regulates, not business, but mechanical instrumentalities with a view to the safety of workmen. See United States v. Colorado &amp; N. W. R. Co., 157 Fed. 321, 330. And before the amendment of i906 the Commerce Act was thought to apply to a railroad within a state only when it handled inter- state shipments under a common arrangement for continuous carriage. United States v. Geddes, 131 Fed. 452; Cincinnati, etc. Ry. Co. v. Interstate Commerce Commission, 162 U. S. 184, I6 Sup. Ct. 700. The amendment makes the two acts define interstate railroads in the same terms. The principal case gives them a similar scope. </p><p>PARTNERSHIP -RIGHTS, DUTIES, AND LIABILITIES OF PARTNERS INTER SE - RIGHT OF PARTNER TO MAINTAIN TROVER FOR UNAUTHORIZED SALE </p><p>Liability Act. Behrens v. Illinois Central R. Co., I92 Fed. 581 (Dist. Ct., E. D. La.). </p><p>The court feels that the fact that the usual and ordinary employment of the decedent included interstate commerce gave him a status of one engaged in interstate commerce and so kept him continuously under the protection of the federal act. Another court has said, however, that an employee might well be subject to the act while engaged in interstate but not while engaged in intrastate commerce. See Colasurdo v. Central R. of New Jersey, i8o Fed. 832, 837. The few cases under the act seem to rest its applicability upon the character of the work in which the employee was engaged when injured. Zikos v. Oregon R. &amp;? Navigation Co., I79 Fed. 893; Taylor v. Southern Ry. Co., I78 Fed. 380. The recent decision of the Supreme Court, in holding that it is not essential that the train doing the injury should be interstate, seems to look merely to the work of the injured employee. Second Employers' Liability Cases, 32 Sup. Ct. I69. The Act of 1906 was declared unconstitutional be- cause it applied to intrastate employees. Employers' Liability Cases, 207 U. S. 463, 28 Sup. Ct. I4I. The construction maintained in the principal case would bring the scope of the present act extremely close to that of its predecessor. </p><p>INTERSTATE COMMERCE - WHAT CONSTITUTES INTERSTATE COMMERCE - </p><p>INTRASTATE JUNCTION RAILWAY HANDLING CARS FOR INTERSTATE SHIPMENT. - A short railway, wholly within a state, switched with its own motive power on through bills of lading interstate carload freight from one trunk line to another, and from the trunk lines to the consignee's sidings. The trunk lines paid the railway by the car. Held, that the railway is subject to the provisions of the Interstate Commerce Act. United States ex rel. Attorney General v. Union Stockyard &amp;P Transit Co., 192 Fed. 330 (Commerce Ct.). </p><p>A shipment is interstate if the shipper intends a single consignment from one state to another. Cutting v. Florida Ry. &amp;e Navigation Co., 46 Fed. 641. See 20 HARV. L. REV. 652. That one of the connecting carriers participating is wholly within one state does not relieve it from interstate obligations. The Daniel Ball, io Wall. (U. S.) 557; Norfolk and Western R. Co. v. Pennsylvania, I36 U. S. II4, 10 Sup. Ct. 958. This is true even though local bills of lading are issued for the shipment. Houston Direct Navigation Co. v. Ins. Co. of North America, 89 Tex. I, 32 S. W. 889; Texas &amp;o Pacific Ry. Co. v. Railroad Commission of Louisiana, I83 Fed. I00oo5. But cf. United States ex rel. Inter- state Commerce Commission v. Chicago, etc. R. Co., 8I Fed. 783. Intrastate terminal companies handling interstate trains are within the act. Southern Pacific Terminal Co. v. Interstate Commerce Commission, 219 U. S. 498, 31 Sup. Ct. 279. Upon facts substantially similar to those in the principal case the federal Safety Appliance Act has been held applicable. Union Stock Yards Co. v. United States, I69 Fed. 404; Belt Ry. Co. v. United States, i68 Fed. 542. It has been suggested that that act is to be construed more broadly, because it regulates, not business, but mechanical instrumentalities with a view to the safety of workmen. See United States v. Colorado &amp; N. W. R. Co., 157 Fed. 321, 330. And before the amendment of i906 the Commerce Act was thought to apply to a railroad within a state only when it handled inter- state shipments under a common arrangement for continuous carriage. United States v. Geddes, 131 Fed. 452; Cincinnati, etc. Ry. Co. v. Interstate Commerce Commission, 162 U. S. 184, I6 Sup. Ct. 700. The amendment makes the two acts define interstate railroads in the same terms. The principal case gives them a similar scope. </p><p>PARTNERSHIP -RIGHTS, DUTIES, AND LIABILITIES OF PARTNERS INTER SE - RIGHT OF PARTNER TO MAINTAIN TROVER FOR UNAUTHORIZED SALE </p><p>74I 74I 74I </p><p>This content downloaded from 194.29.185.178 on Mon, 19 May 2014 02:47:52 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p>Article Contentsp. 741</p><p>Issue Table of ContentsHarvard Law Review, Vol. 25, No. 8 (Jun., 1912), pp. 677-753Limitations of the Statutory Power of Majority Stockholders to Dissolve a Corporation [pp. 677 - 690]Written Evidence and Alterations [pp. 691 - 703]A Word about Commissions [pp. 704 - 716]NotesRegulation of Monopoly under the Sherman Anti-Trust Act [pp. 717 - 719]Suits Contesting Ownership of Corporate Stock [pp. 719 - 720]Liability of Charitable Corporations for Torts [pp. 720 - 723]Liability of Railroad Right of Way for Local Assessments [pp. 723 - 725]Recovery of Money Loaned to Person Having No Legal Capacity to Contract [pp. 725 - 726]Liability of Lessor Railroad for Acts of Lessee [pp. 726 - 728]Priority of Assignees under Successive Assignments of Equitable Interest [pp. 728 - 729]Ratification of Unauthorized Contracts of Insurance after Occurrence of Loss [pp. 729 - 731]Specific Performance with Abatement of Purchase Price [pp. 731 - 733]Indians and the United States [pp. 733 - 734]</p><p>Recent CasesAgency. Nature and Incidents of Relation. Father's Liability for Torts of Son [pp. 734 - 735]Agency. Ratification of Unauthorized Contracts. Contract of Insurance Ratified after Occurrence of Loss [p. 735]Ambassadors and Consuls. Right of Consul to Be Appointed Administrator of Foreign Decedent's Estate [pp. 735 - 736]Bills and Notes. Negotiability. Note Reciting Its Consideration to Be a Conditional Sale [pp. 736 - 737]Chattel Mortgages. Recording and Registry. What Creditors Are Protected [pp. 737 - 738]Constitutional Law. Due Process of Law. Owner Charged with Contractor's Debts in Default of Requiring Bond for Their Payment [p. 738]Contracts. Suits by Third Persons Not Parties to Contract. Action by Pedestrian against Street Railway for Breach of Its Contract with City to Keep Sidewalks in Repair [pp....</p></li></ul>

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