dump truck tip over preventions or

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  1. 1. Dump Truck Tip OverDump Truck Tip Over PREVENTION AND DETECTION P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  2. 2. First things firstFirst things first Have you been oriented to the site have you done a pre-job hazard assessment Do you know your load how much does it weight were is your center of gravity P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  3. 3. We must talk center of gravityWe must talk center of gravity P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  4. 4. It works for all unit includingIt works for all unit including truckstrucks P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  5. 5. Where are your FORCESWhere are your FORCES 0.8g Forward Force = 80% of Cargo weight when driving straight ahead. 0.5g Rearward Force = 50% of Cargo weight when accelerating, shifting gears while climbing a hill, or braking in reverse. 0.5g Sideways Force = 50% of Cargo weight when turning, changing lanes, or braking while turning. 0.2g Upward Force = 20% of Cargo weight when traveling over bumps in the road or cresting a hill for vehicles that the cargo is not fully contained inside. NACSS Fundamentals of Cargo Securement (page 7) P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  6. 6. Your Hazard Everyone RiskYour Hazard Everyone Risk As end-dump truck bodies and semi-trailer dumping rigs get longer, the incidence of units tipping over has increased. This type of accident is more frequently connected with semitrailer rigs than with straight trucks. In the last couple of years, one fatality and at least one serious injury have resulted when dump trucks tipped over. Statistics on the frequency of tip-overs are not available because the occurrences are not reported unless injuries result. However, construction personnel involved in dump truck operations agree that tip-overs are becoming more frequent. P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  7. 7. One or moreOne or more Stability is adversely affected by one or more of the following factors: the unit is not on a level surface when dumping a large amount of material is in the upper portion of the raised box material does not flow out of the top portion of the box, or does not flow out of one side of the top portion the rear wheels settle unevenly as the load moves to the rear during dumping wind may exert lateral loads, especially if the box is long, as is the case with end-dump semi-trailers. Stability may also be affected by the unit's mechanical condition: poor rear suspension systems on one side of the vehicle uneven tire pressures in rear wheels worn or inadequate components of the lifting system such as pins worn or inadequate lifting cylinders. P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  8. 8. Hazard ControlHazard Control Because of stability problems with semi-trailers, they should not be used for haulage to rough grading or fill areas where surfaces are often uneven or loosely compacted. Straight trucks or straight trucks and pup trailers are more appropriate for highway haulage to these dump areas. Where haulage and dumping are all on site, straight trucks or off-highway vehicles are even better choices. Where aggregates are being spread for road construction, belly-dump semi- trailers are more appropriate than end-dump semi-trailers. Sometimes vehicle selection is not an option for the contractor. Material suppliers or haulers do not always use equipment appropriate to a particular site. However, when contractors do have a choice they should select equipment in accordance with these recommendations to reduce tip-overs. Cold weather may cause materials to freeze to the box and stick when dumping. Using heated boxes will reduce the problem. During winter, loads should not be left in dump boxes overnight. P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  9. 9. PM Preventative Maintenance isPM Preventative Maintenance is Part of the solution not thePart of the solution not the problemproblem Maintenance can play an important role in preventing tip- overs. Check tire pressures daily. Tire pressures should be equal on each side of the vehicle. Examine and lubricate pins and bushings regularly. Inspect suspension systems under load to ensure that they work properly and provide even suspension. Weak suspension systems should be replaced immediately. Inspect hoist cylinders regularly. Worn cylinders should not be replaced with smaller cylinders or with cylinders rated at lower operating pressure. Make sure that repairs to boxes leave bottom and sides clear and unrestricted. Rough patchwork repairs near the top of the box can catch and hold sticky materials. P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  10. 10. How did some one load meHow did some one load me Loading of the box front-to-back must meet allowable gross weight and axle weight limitations set by the Ministry of Transportation. From side to side it is best to load as evenly as possible. If material is likely to flow poorly, lighten up the load in the top end of the box. A slightly smaller load will be better than a full load that causes a tip-over. Box liners will help most materials flow better during dumping. Liners also help to keep the box in good condition. P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  11. 11. Timing Is EverythingTiming Is Everything EVERY 12 MINUTESEVERY 12 MINUTES-- someone dies in a motor vehicle crash EVERY 10 SECONDSEVERY 10 SECONDS-- a collision-related injury occurs EVERY 5 SECONDSEVERY 5 SECONDS-- a vehicle collision occurs P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  12. 12. Four More Hazards to always askFour More Hazards to always ask Always where is the power line Where are all the pedestrians What machines are near me What are my blind spots P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  13. 13. ElectricalElectrical HazardsHazards P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  14. 14. Struck-ByStruck-By HazardsHazards Who andWho and what iswhat is workingworking close to meclose to me P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  15. 15. Electrical HarmElectrical Harm Where is the lineWhere is the line Estimated Effects of AC Currents (U.S. Standard 60 Hz) 1 milliamp (mA) Barely perceptible 16 mA Maximum current an average man can grasp and let go 20 30 mA Paralysis of respiratory muscles 100 mA Ventricular fibrillation threshold 2 Amps Cardiac standstill and internal organ damage 15/20/30 Amps Common U.S. household breakers PATH: Harm is related to the path by which current passes through the body. P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
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  17. 17. P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  18. 18. Power Line FactsPower Line Facts Overhead lines are typically not insulated. Any covering is generally a weather protection, not insulation. Over 90 percent of the contacts occur on overhead distribution lines Operators are normally safe if they stay on the equipment Ground personnel are over 8 times more likely to be killed P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  19. 19. Electrical Damage to the BodyElectrical Damage to the Body If you touch a power line, electricity will attempt to travel through your body When electricity travels through the body, it heats up and burns body tissue internally Electricity leaves the body violently, causing burns or even blowing an exit hole P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  20. 20. MINIMUM 10' DistanceP bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  21. 21. Bail Out ProceduresBail Out Procedures If you must get out, jump with your feet together Do not touch the machine Hop or shuffle out of the area P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  22. 22. Striking Workers on FootStriking Workers on Foot P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  23. 23. Poor Worker PositionPoor Worker Position This worker is out of the drivers mirror view P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  24. 24. Pinned In/Under EquipmentPinned In/Under Equipment A truck driver was working between the frame and dump box of a dump truck The dump box dropped suddenly, crushing his head P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  25. 25. EquipmentEquipment Does Roll Over!Does Roll Over! P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  26. 26. Wear Your Seat Belt!Wear Your Seat Belt! When there is a roll- over hazard, there must be a seat belt Always wear the seat belt Only ride in the seat provided No riding in buckets, on fenders or on steps P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  27. 27. Where are those blind spots whoWhere are those blind spots who is working with in them WHY!is working with in them WHY! P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  28. 28. Backing EquipmentBacking Equipment Have audible back- up alarms Have a spotter to direct the operator if visibility is restricted Keep adequate clearance behind the vehicle Always pay attention to backing equipment P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  29. 29. High Visibility ClothingHigh Visibility Clothing High visibility clothing refers to reflective garments that workers should wear whenever their work place contains hazards related to low visibility or when they work near vehicles or moving equipment P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  30. 30. Caught in Between HazardsCaught in Between Hazards P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  31. 31. Dumping TrucksDumping Trucks Stay clear of dump trucks while they are dumping Trucks can become unstable with the boxes raised Watch for spillage out of the end gates If an end gate chain breaks, you could be covered in material P bar Y Safety Consultants Alberta Canada
  32. 32. All Equipment Dump Truck or noAll Equipment Dump Truck or no dump truckdump truck Do not jump from equipment Use three point contact at all times Be sure of your footing Do not strain your shoulders