designing an effective powerpoint

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Designing an Effective PowerPoint. Part 3: Practical Guides. Interior Content. Interior Content - Everything that constitutes your Powerpoint Presentation (slides, slide content, slide content animations, slide transitions). Creating Slides. Insert > New Slide - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Designing an Effective PowerPointPart 3: Practical Guides

  • Interior ContentInterior Content - Everything that constitutes your Powerpoint Presentation (slides, slide content, slide content animations, slide transitions).

  • Creating SlidesInsert > New SlideInsert > (Choose content, e.g. Picture, Text Box)3) Manipulate Size and Position of Content

  • TransitionsTransition - An effect that determines how slides progressively show up on-screen, e.g. Blinds, Cut, Wipe.

  • Creating Transitions (Normal View)View slide you wish to editSlide Show > Slide TransitionChange slideshow transitionClick Apply

  • Transition AdviceTransitions must support, not distractMake transitions fit contentNo transition is just fineMultiple transition types annoy

  • AnimationAnimation - An effect that determines how elements of a slide appear on screen, e.g. Dissolve, Fly In, Flash Once.

  • Creating AnimationSelect slide elementSlide Show > Pre-Set Animations >(select an animation) OR2) Slide Show > Custom Animations >(select order and animation for each slide element)

  • Animation AdviceTransitions Must Support, Not DistractMake Transitions Fit ContentNo Transition is Just FineMultiple Transition Types Annoy

  • Bad Example 1Choose Rubbish, Inc.The FastestThe StrongestThe Least Accident Prone

  • Bad Example 2Rubbish, Inc TestimonialsRobert Johnson:I use Rubbish, Inc. for all my rubbish requirements- its their professional staph and their famously trashy service that really makes the difference.John Robertson:Without Rubbish, Inc. life is just a sequence of days extending one after another; a giant garbge heap, signifying nothing.

  • Good Example 1Choose Rubbish, Inc.The FastestThe StrongestThe Least Accident Prone

  • Good Example 2Rubbish, Inc TestimonialsRobert Johnson:I use Rubbish, Inc. for all my rubbish requirements- its their professional staph and their famously trashy service that really makes the difference.John Robertson:Without Rubbish, Inc. life is just a sequence of days extending one after another; a giant garbge heap, signifying nothing.

  • Exterior ContentExterior Content - Everything in your presentation other than your Powerpoint. The best presentations include practiced hand gestures, polished verbal delivery, and some form of crowd interaction.

  • Exterior Content HelpUse your PowerPoint as an aid to your presentation, not as your presentationBe sure that your Exterior Content and your Interior Content are differentKnow your presentation space and execute your gestures and volume accordingly

  • Basic Look (Corporate)Strong, Clean LinesNo Unnecessary ElementsNo Unusual Typefaces

  • Alternate MethodNo TemplateNo more than six words on a slideImage heavyLittle or no animationsRely even more on Exterior Content

  • drunk Driving

    K I L L S

  • KNOW WHEN TOSTOP

  • The End

    Rationale: Welcome to Designing an Effective PowerPoint, Part 3: Practical Guides. The goal of this presentation is to introduce you to the practical tasks involved in creating a PowerPoint project. There are always many methods with which to create PowerPoint presentations, and the ones covered in this document are some of the simplest.

    This guide assumes that the reader is creating a presentation to deliver in front of a group of people. For that reason, it covers creating new slides, transitions, animations, integrating material outside of PowerPoint into a presentation and includes a brief discussion of an alternate way to use PowerPoint. The practical advice this guide offers applies to all versions of PowerPoint, but the nuts and bolts of this guides practical information (the organization of menus, for instance) applies most readily to Microsoft Office 2003 for PCs and Microsoft Office 2004 for Macs.

    This document is most useful when used in conjunction with Designing an Effective PowerPoint Parts 1 and 2 (Before You Start and Design Principles, respectively).

    Directions: Each slide is activated by a single mouse click, unless otherwise noted in bold at the bottom of each notes page

    Writer and Designer: Lars Erik SderlundSpecial Thanks to Robin Williams, whose Non-Designers Design Book and Design Workshop were helpful aids in the development of these materials.Developed with resources courtesy of the Purdue University Writing LabGrant funding courtesy of the Multimedia Instructional Development Center at Purdue University Copyright Purdue University, 2000, 2006Rationale: This slide defines the term Interior Content. Note that Interior Content does not include your spoken part of the presentation, your hand gestures, or your movement around the room. Those will also be indispensable parts of your presentation and I refer to them as Exterior Content (more on that later).Rationale: The first step in making any PowerPoint is to create a slide (that is, to insert the slide into your presentation). In most versions of PowerPoint, click on Insert from the File Menu and then click New Slide. After your new slide appears, you add content by clicking Insert and then some type of content (a picture or a text box, for example).

    I have made the instructions on this slide and others purposefully simple as a reminder that the process is essentially a simple one. Even the best presentations are still just slides with content on top of them.Rationale: This slide explains transitions. This next slide will appear with a Transition called Wipe Right.Rationale: This slide explains how to create transitions from the Normal View within PowerPoint. Normal View is the default view of PowerPoint, and likely the view you currently have in order to view these Speaker Notes. To create a transition between PowerPoint slides, view the slide you wish to edit (the slide you wish to be introduced with a selected transition) and follow the directions above.Rationale: Transitions can be fun, but must be used carefully. For example, I would not have used Wipe Right on the previous slide transition if I did not feel it necessary to make sure that all viewers knew the definition of transitions. If you are going to include a transition, be sure that it serves a purpose within your presentation.Rationale: Animations are what people often picture in their minds when they think of PowerPoint. Have you ever seen the items of a bulleted list PowerPoint fly across the screen into place, one by one? That is an animation. Text on this page has appeared with an animation called Fade In.Rationale: This slide shows you how to create animations. First, click on the slide element (picture, text, graphic) you wish to animate. Then, under the Slide Show Menu, click Pre-Set Animations and select an animation. Or you can have your element(s) appear in a customized way by selecting Custom Animations under the Slide Show Menu.Rationale: The same advice applies for Animations as for Transitions. Make sure that every design decision you make has a reason within the context of your presentation.Rationale: This slide and the next one are examples of bad transitions and animations. Their wild, random effects seem to grab the audiences attention, but they actually distract from the message that they are trying to convey. See the coverage of Contrast and Repetition in Designing an Effective PowerPoint Part 2, Design Principles.

    Note: you must enter Slide Show View mode in order to view the transitions and animations.Rationale: This slides transitions are even more distracting. After such exciting and varied transitions, can any content measure up? The audience will quickly lose interest in the message after so much flash in the presentation.Rationale: This slide and the next are better examples of transition and animation use. They are much less noticeable, and so fit into the flow of the presentation. If you feel you must have animation, be sure to make it classy. Try to do as little design as you can so that your message is more effectively framed. There is a reason that elegant is a synonym of minimal.Rationale: For a presentation to be effective, it must include content that outside of PowerPoint.Rationale: When planning the delivery of your presentation, keep in mind what will be best expressed by you in your own voice; remember, rarely can even the best PowerPoint take the place of a real, human voice. Similarly, try not to rely too much on a laser pointer; instead use the design of your slides to direct your audiences attention.

    Remember what Powerpoint can do and what it can't (and keep in mind what you're comfortable doing in PowerPoint and not). If you want to have an audiences complete, undivided attention, leave time between slides to talk uninterrupted, or even insert a white, blank slide and look your audience in the eye as you speak to them. Further, you can use Presenter Tools" and other facilities in the newer versions of PowerPoint to enhance your presentation. Search your Office softwares Help for assistance on presenter tools, and consult rhetoric and elocution manuals for help in public speaking.Rationale: This slide defines the traditional corporate PowerPoint look. It is practical to the core, with strong, clean lines (such as the left margin), no superfluous elements (extra pictures or colors), and no unusual or weird typefaces. What most people forget, though, is that the "corporate look" is not always the most effective, even in corporate presentations. Sometimes an extra picture or an unusual font will add personality to a project, which is good if that's what you are going for. Keeping CARP in mind (a mnemonic for Contrast, Alignment, Repetition, and Proximity, explained in Designing and Effective PowerPoint, Part 2) will ensure that your presentation is still

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