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Oracle® Fusion Middleware Administering Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c (12.2.1.4.0) E95170-07 November 2020

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  • Oracle® Fusion MiddlewareAdministering Oracle Fusion Middleware

    12c (12.2.1.4.0)E95170-07November 2020

  • Oracle Fusion Middleware Administering Oracle Fusion Middleware, 12c (12.2.1.4.0)

    E95170-07

    Copyright © 2015, 2020, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

    Primary Author: Oracle Corporation

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  • Contents

    PrefaceAudience xxii

    Documentation Accessibility xxii

    Related Documents xxii

    Conventions xxiii

    Part I About Oracle Fusion Middleware

    1 Introduction to Oracle Fusion MiddlewareWhat Is Oracle Fusion Middleware? 1-1

    Oracle Fusion Middleware Components 1-1

    Part II Basic Administration

    2 Getting Started Managing Oracle Fusion MiddlewareOverview of Oracle Fusion Middleware Administration Tools 2-2

    Getting Started Using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control 2-5

    Displaying Fusion Middleware Control 2-5

    Using Fusion Middleware Control Help 2-6

    Navigating Within Fusion Middleware Control 2-6

    About Users and Roles for Fusion Middleware Control 2-10

    Locking the WebLogic Server Configuration 2-12

    Viewing and Managing the WebLogic Domain 2-12

    Viewing and Managing Java Components 2-13

    Viewing and Managing System Components 2-14

    Getting Started Using Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console 2-15

    Getting Started Using the Oracle WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST) 2-16

    Using WLST with Java Components and Oracle Fusion Middleware Services 2-16

    Using WLST Commands with System Components 2-17

    iii

  • Getting Started Using the Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browsers 2-19

    About MBeans 2-19

    Using the System MBean Browser 2-20

    Using the MBeans for a Selected Application 2-20

    Changing the Administrative User Password 2-21

    Changing the Administrative User Password Using the Command Line 2-21

    Changing the Administrative User Password Using Fusion Middleware Control 2-21

    Configuring Node Manager 2-22

    Configuring Node Manager to Start Managed Servers 2-22

    Configuring Node Manager to Use the OPSS Keystore Service 2-23

    Basic Tasks for Configuring and Managing Oracle Fusion Middleware 2-24

    3 Wiring Components to Work TogetherAbout Service Tables 3-1

    Viewing Service Tables 3-1

    Wiring Components Together 3-2

    Viewing the Component End Points 3-3

    Wiring Oracle HTTP Server to the Administration Server 3-3

    Why Wire Oracle HTTP Server to the Administration Server? 3-3

    Connecting Oracle HTTP Server to the Administration Server 3-4

    Routing Applications Through Oracle HTTP Server to Oracle WebLogic Server 3-5

    4 Starting and Stopping Oracle Fusion MiddlewareOverview of Starting and Stopping Procedures 4-1

    Starting and Stopping Administration and Managed Servers and Node Manager 4-2

    Starting and Stopping Administration Server 4-2

    Starting and Stopping Node Manager 4-2

    Starting and Stopping Managed Servers 4-3

    Starting and Stopping Managed Servers Using Fusion Middleware Control 4-3

    Starting and Stopping Managed Servers Using Scripts 4-3

    Enabling Servers to Start Without Supplying Credentials 4-4

    Setting Up Oracle WebLogic Server as a Windows Service 4-4

    Starting and Stopping Components 4-5

    Starting and Stopping Components Using Fusion Middleware Control 4-5

    Starting and Stopping Components Using the Command Line 4-5

    Starting and Stopping Java Components 4-5

    Starting and Stopping System Components 4-6

    Starting and Stopping Fusion Middleware Control 4-7

    Starting and Stopping Applications 4-7

    iv

  • Starting and Stopping Java EE Applications Using Fusion Middleware Control 4-7

    Starting and Stopping Java EE Applications Using WLST 4-8

    Starting and Stopping Your Oracle Fusion Middleware Environment 4-8

    Starting an Oracle Fusion Middleware Environment 4-8

    Stopping an Oracle Fusion Middleware Environment 4-9

    Starting and Stopping: Special Topics 4-10

    Starting and Stopping in High Availability Environments 4-10

    Forcing a Shutdown of an Oracle Database 4-10

    5 Managing PortsAbout Managing Ports 5-1

    Viewing Port Numbers 5-1

    Viewing Port Numbers Using the Command Line 5-1

    Viewing Port Numbers Using Fusion Middleware Control 5-2

    Changing the Port Numbers Used by Oracle Fusion Middleware 5-2

    Changing the Oracle WebLogic Server Listen Ports 5-3

    Changing the Oracle WebLogic Server Listen Ports Using FusionMiddleware Control 5-3

    Changing the Oracle WebLogic Server Listen Ports Using WLST 5-3

    Changing the Node Manager Listen Port 5-3

    Changing the Node Manager Listen Port Using WLST 5-4

    Changing the Node Manager Listen Port Using Fusion Middleware Control 5-4

    Changing the Oracle HTTP Server Listen Ports 5-4

    Enabling Oracle HTTP Server to Run as Root for Ports Set to Less Than1024 (UNIX Only) 5-4

    Changing the Oracle HTTP Server Non-SSL Listen Port in a WebLogicServer Domain 5-5

    Changing the Oracle HTTP Server SSL Listen Port in a WebLogic ServerDomain 5-5

    Changing the Oracle HTTP Server Listen Ports in a Standalone Domain 5-6

    Changing the Oracle Database Net Listener Port 5-6

    Changing the KEY Value for an IPC Listener 5-8

    Part III Secure Communication

    6 Configuring SSL in Oracle Fusion MiddlewareHow SSL Works 6-2

    What SSL Provides 6-3

    About Private and Public Key Cryptography 6-3

    Keystores and Wallets 6-4

    v

  • How SSL Sessions Are Conducted 6-5

    About SSL in Oracle Fusion Middleware 6-6

    SSL in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Architecture 6-7

    Keystores and Oracle Wallets 6-8

    TLS Protocol Support in Oracle Fusion Middleware 6-9

    Authentication Modes in Oracle Fusion Middleware 6-10

    Tools for SSL Configuration 6-10

    Configuring SSL for Configuration Tools 6-11

    Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control 6-11

    Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console 6-12

    WLST Command-Line Tool 6-12

    orapki Utility 6-12

    Configuring SSL for the Web Tier 6-12

    Configuring Load Balancers 6-13

    Enabling SSL for Oracle HTTP Server Virtual Hosts 6-13

    Enabling SSL for Inbound Requests to Oracle HTTP Server Virtual HostsUsing Fusion Middleware Control 6-14

    Enabling SSL for Inbound Requests to Oracle HTTP Server Virtual HostsUsing WLST 6-15

    Enabling SSL for Outbound Requests from Oracle HTTP Server 6-15

    Configuring SSL for the Middle Tier 6-17

    Configuring SSL for Oracle WebLogic Server 6-17

    Configuring Inbound SSL to Oracle WebLogic Server 6-17

    Configuring Outbound SSL from Oracle WebLogic Server 6-18

    Client-Side SSL for Applications 6-19

    Configuring SSL for the Data Tier 6-19

    Configuring SSL for the Database 6-19

    SSL-Enabling Oracle Database 6-19

    SSL-Enabling a Data Source 6-22

    Setting Up One-Way SSL to the LDAP Security Store 6-23

    Setting Up SSL in Identity Store Services 6-24

    Setting up One-Way SSL in Identity Store Services using libOVD and JKS 6-25

    Setting up Two-Way SSL in Identity Store Services using libOVD and JKS 6-26

    Advanced SSL Scenarios 6-26

    Hardware Security Modules and Accelerators 6-26

    CRL Integration with SSL 6-28

    Configuring CRL Validation for a Component 6-28

    Manage CRLs on the File System 6-29

    Test a Component Configured for CRL Validation 6-30

    Oracle Fusion Middleware FIPS 140-2 Settings 6-30

    Best Practices for SSL 6-30

    Best Practices for Administrators 6-30

    vi

  • Best Practices for Application Developers 6-31

    WLST Reference for SSL 6-31

    7 Managing Keystores, Wallets, and CertificatesKey and Certificate Storage in Oracle Fusion Middleware 7-1

    Types of Keystores 7-1

    About Oracle Wallet 7-2

    About the JKS Keystore 7-3

    About the Keystore Service (KSS) Keystore 7-3

    Keystore Management Tools 7-3

    Command-Line Interface for Keystores and Wallets 7-4

    How to Launch the Command-Line Interface 7-4

    Keystore Management 7-6

    Wallet Management 7-6

    About Wallets and Certificates 7-7

    About Password-Protected and Autologin Wallets 7-7

    About Self-Signed and Third-Party Wallets 7-8

    Sharing Wallets Across Instances 7-8

    Wallet Naming Conventions 7-8

    Wallet Requirements in JDK7 7-9

    Managing the Wallet Life Cycle 7-9

    Common Wallet Operations 7-10

    Creating a Wallet Using orapki 7-10

    Adding a Self-Signed Certificate to a Wallet Using orapki 7-10

    Managing the Certificate Life Cycle 7-10

    Common Certificate Operations 7-11

    Adding a Certificate Request Using orapki 7-11

    Exporting a Certificate from an Oracle Wallet using orapki 7-11

    Exporting a Certificate Request Using orapki 7-12

    Importing a Trusted Certificate Using orapki 7-12

    Importing a User Certificate Using orapki 7-12

    Creating a Signed Certificate from Certificate Requests Using orapki 7-12

    Wallet and Certificate Maintenance 7-13

    Location of Wallets 7-13

    Effect of Host Name Change on a Wallet 7-13

    Changing a Self-Signed Wallet to a Third-Party Wallet 7-14

    Replacing an Expiring Certificate in a Wallet 7-15

    vii

  • 8 FIPS 140 Support in Oracle Fusion MiddlewareAbout the FIPS Standard 8-1

    About FIPS 140-2 in Oracle Fusion Middleware Release 12c 8-2

    About FIPS 140-2 Validated Libraries 8-2

    About Provider and Algorithm Selection 8-3

    Components with FIPS 140 Support 8-4

    Common Scenarios for an Operational FIPS 140-2 Environment 8-6

    Troubleshooting FIPS 140 Issues 8-8

    FIPS 140 Troubleshooting for Stand-alone WebLogic Server 8-9

    FIPS 140 Troubleshooting for Oracle Platform Security Services 8-9

    FIPS 140 Troubleshooting for Oracle Web Services Manager 8-10

    FIPS 140 Troubleshooting for Database and JDBC Driver 8-10

    Part IV Deploying Applications

    9 Understanding the Deployment ProcessWhat Is a Deployer? 9-1

    General Procedures for Moving from Application Design to Production Deployment 9-2

    Designing and Developing an Application 9-2

    Deploying an Application to Managed Servers 9-2

    Automating the Migration of an Application to Other Environments 9-5

    Diagnosing Typical Deployment Problems 9-6

    10

    Deploying Applications

    Overview of Deploying Applications 10-2

    What Types of Applications Can You Deploy? 10-2

    About Deployment, Redeployment, and Undeployment 10-3

    Understanding and Managing Data Sources 10-4

    About Data Sources 10-4

    Creating and Managing JDBC Data Sources 10-5

    Creating a JDBC Data Source Using Fusion Middleware Control 10-6

    Editing a JDBC Data Source Using Fusion Middleware Control 10-6

    Monitoring a JDBC Data Source Using Fusion Middleware Control 10-7

    Controlling a JDBC Data Source Using Fusion Middleware Control 10-7

    Creating a GridLink Data Source Using Fusion Middleware Control 10-7

    Deploying, Undeploying, and Redeploying Java EE Applications 10-8

    About Managed Server Independence and Deploying Applications 10-8

    Deploying Java EE Applications 10-9

    viii

  • Deploying Java EE Applications Using Fusion Middleware Control 10-9

    Deploying Java EE Applications Using WLST 10-12

    Undeploying Java EE Applications 10-12

    Undeploying Java EE Applications Using Fusion Middleware Control 10-12

    Undeploying Java EE Applications Using WLST 10-13

    Redeploying Java EE Applications 10-13

    Redeploying Java EE Applications Using Fusion Middleware Control 10-13

    Redeploying Java EE Applications Using WLST 10-15

    Deploying, Undeploying, and Redeploying Oracle ADF Applications 10-15

    Deploying Oracle ADF Applications 10-16

    Deploying ADF Applications Using Fusion Middleware Control 10-16

    Deploying ADF Applications Using WLST 10-18

    Deploying ADF Applications Using the Administration Console 10-19

    Undeploying Oracle ADF Applications 10-19

    Redeploying Oracle ADF Applications 10-20

    Deploying, Undeploying, and Redeploying SOA Composite Applications 10-21

    Deploying SOA Composite Applications 10-22

    Undeploying SOA Composite Applications 10-23

    Redeploying SOA Composite Applications 10-23

    Deploying, Undeploying, and Redeploying WebCenter Portal Applications 10-24

    Deploying WebCenter Portal Applications 10-24

    Undeploying WebCenter Portal Applications 10-27

    Redeploying WebCenter Portal Applications 10-27

    Managing Deployment Plans 10-28

    About the Common Deployment Tasks in Fusion Middleware Control 10-29

    Configuring Applications in Fusion Middleware Control 10-31

    Changing MDS Configuration Attributes for Deployed Applications 10-31

    Changing the MDS Configuration Attributes Using Fusion Middleware Control 10-32

    Changing the MDS Configuration Using WLST 10-35

    Restoring the Original MDS Configuration for an Application 10-36

    Part V Monitoring Oracle Fusion Middleware

    11

    Monitoring Oracle Fusion Middleware

    Monitoring the Status of Oracle Fusion Middleware 11-1

    Monitoring an Oracle WebLogic Server Domain 11-2

    Monitoring an Oracle WebLogic Server Administration or Managed Server 11-2

    Monitoring a Cluster 11-3

    Monitoring a Java Component 11-3

    Monitoring a System Component 11-3

    ix

  • Monitoring Java EE Applications 11-4

    Monitoring ADF Applications 11-4

    Monitoring the SOA Infrastructure and SOA Composite Applications 11-4

    Monitoring Oracle WebCenter Portal Applications 11-5

    Monitoring Applications Deployed to a Cluster 11-5

    Monitoring the Status of Components Using the Command Line 11-5

    Viewing the Performance of Oracle Fusion Middleware 11-6

    12

    Managing Log Files and Diagnostic Data

    Overview of Oracle Fusion Middleware Logging 12-1

    About Oracle Fusion Middleware HTTP Access Logging 12-2

    About Oracle Fusion Middleware Diagnostic Logging 12-2

    About ODL Messages and ODL Log Files 12-3

    Viewing and Searching Log Files 12-6

    Viewing Log Files and Their Messages 12-7

    Viewing Log Files and Their Messages Using Fusion Middleware Control 12-7

    Viewing Log Files and Their Messages Using WLST 12-8

    Searching Log Files 12-9

    Searching Log Files Using Fusion Middleware Control 12-9

    Searching Log Files Using WLST 12-11

    Downloading Log Files 12-12

    Downloading Log Files Using Fusion Middleware Control 12-12

    Downloading Log Files for Specific Components Using Fusion MiddlewareControl 12-13

    Downloading Specific Types of Messages Using Fusion Middleware Control 12-13

    Downloading Log Files Using WLST 12-14

    Configuring Settings for Log Files 12-14

    Changing Log File Locations 12-15

    Changing Log File Locations Using Fusion Middleware Control 12-15

    Changing Log File Locations Using WLST 12-16

    Configuring Log File Rotation 12-16

    Specifying Log File Rotation Using Fusion Middleware Control 12-16

    Specifying Log File Rotation Using WLST 12-17

    Setting the Level of Information Written to Log Files 12-17

    Configuring Message Levels for a Log File Using Fusion Middleware Control 12-19

    Configuring Message Levels for Loggers Using Fusion Middleware Control 12-20

    Configuring Message Levels Using WLST 12-20

    Specifying the Log File Format 12-21

    Specifying the Log File Format Using Fusion Middleware Control 12-21

    Specifying the Log File Format Using WLST 12-22

    Specifying the Log File Locale 12-22

    x

  • Specifying the Log File Encoding Using WLST 12-22

    Specifying the Log File Encoding in logging.xml 12-23

    About Correlating Messages Across Log Files and Components 12-23

    Understanding ECIDs and RIDs in Correlating Messages 12-23

    Correlating Messages Across Messages and Components 12-24

    Configuring Tracing 12-24

    Configuring and Using QuickTrace 12-25

    About Quick Trace 12-25

    Configuring QuickTrace 12-25

    Writing Trace Messages to a File 12-27

    Disabling QuickTrace Using WLST 12-28

    Configuring and Using Selective Tracing 12-29

    About Selective Tracing 12-29

    Configuring Selective Tracing 12-29

    Viewing Selective Traces 12-31

    Disabling Selective Tracing 12-32

    13

    Diagnosing Problems

    About the Diagnostic Framework 13-1

    About Incidents and Problems 13-3

    Incident Flood Control 13-3

    Diagnostic Framework Components 13-4

    Automatic Diagnostic Repository 13-4

    Diagnostic Dumps 13-6

    Diagnostic Framework Management MBeans 13-6

    WLST Commands for Diagnostic Framework 13-6

    ADRCI Command-Line Utility 13-6

    How the Diagnostic Framework Works 13-7

    Configuring the Diagnostic Framework 13-10

    Configuring Diagnostic Framework Settings 13-10

    Configuring Custom Diagnostic Rules 13-12

    Configuring Problem Suppression 13-16

    Retrieving Problem Key Filters 13-18

    Configuring WLDF Policies and Actions for the Diagnostic Framework 13-18

    Investigating, Reporting, and Solving a Problem 13-22

    Roadmap—Investigating, Reporting, and Resolving a Problem 13-22

    Viewing Problems and Incidents 13-24

    Viewing Problems 13-24

    Viewing Incidents 13-25

    Querying Incidents 13-26

    xi

  • Analyzing Specific Problem Keys 13-27

    Working with Diagnostic Dumps 13-28

    Listing Diagnostic Dumps 13-28

    Viewing a Description of a Diagnostic Dump 13-29

    Executing Dumps 13-29

    Configuring and Using Diagnostic Dump Sampling 13-30

    About Diagnostic Dump Sampling 13-30

    Configuring Dump Sampling 13-32

    Listing Dump Samplings 13-34

    Retrieving the Dump Sampling Output 13-34

    Managing Incidents 13-36

    Creating an Incident Manually 13-36

    Creating an Aggregated Incident 13-37

    Packaging an Incident 13-38

    Purging Incidents 13-40

    Generating an RDA Report 13-40

    Part VI Advanced Administration

    14

    Managing the Metadata Repository

    About Metadata Repositories 14-1

    Creating a Database-Based Metadata Repository 14-2

    Managing the MDS Repository 14-3

    Overview of the MDS Repository 14-3

    Databases Supported by MDS 14-5

    About MDS Operations 14-5

    Registering and Deregistering a Database-Based MDS Repository 14-7

    Registering a Database-Based MDS Repository 14-8

    Targeting Additional Servers to an MDS Repository 14-9

    Removing Servers Targeted to a Metadata Repository 14-9

    Deregistering a Database-Based MDS Repository 14-10

    Registering and Deregistering a File-Based MDS Repository 14-11

    Creating and Registering a File-Based MDS Repository 14-11

    Deregistering a File-Based MDS Repository 14-12

    Changing the System Data Source 14-12

    Using System MBeans to Manage an MDS Repository 14-13

    Viewing Information About an MDS Repository 14-13

    Viewing Information About an MDS Repository Using Fusion MiddlewareControl 14-13

    Viewing Information About an MDS Repository Using System MBeans 14-14

    xii

  • Configuring an Application to Use a Different MDS Repository or Partition 14-15

    Cloning a Partition 14-16

    Creating a New Partition and Reassociating the Application to It 14-17

    Moving Metadata from a Source System to a Target System 14-17

    Transferring Metadata Using Fusion Middleware Control 14-18

    Transferring Metadata using WLST 14-19

    Moving from a File-Based Repository to a Database-Based Repository 14-19

    Deleting a Metadata Partition from a Repository 14-20

    Deleting a Metadata Partition Using Fusion Middleware Control 14-20

    Deleting a Metadata Partition Using WLST 14-21

    Purging Metadata Version History 14-21

    Purging Metadata Version History Using Fusion Middleware Control 14-21

    Purging Metadata Version History Using WLST 14-22

    Enabling Auto-Purge 14-22

    Managing Metadata Labels in the MDS Repository 14-22

    About Metadata Labels 14-22

    Creating Metadata Labels 14-23

    Listing Metadata Labels 14-23

    Promoting Metadata Labels 14-23

    Purging Metadata Labels 14-24

    Deleting Metadata Labels 14-25

    Managing Metadata Repository Schemas 14-26

    Changing Metadata Repository Schema Passwords 14-26

    Changing the Schema Passwords for Most Components 14-26

    Changing the Schema Password for Oracle Platform Security Services 14-27

    Changing the Character Set of the Metadata Repository 14-27

    Purging Data 14-28

    Purging Oracle Infrastructure Web Services Data 14-30

    Purging Oracle WebCenter Portal Data 14-30

    Purging Oracle WebCenter Portal's Activity Stream Data 14-30

    Purging Oracle WebCenter Portal's Analytics Data 14-30

    Partitioning Oracle WebCenter Portal's Analytics Data 14-33

    15

    Changing Oracle Fusion Middleware Network Configurations

    About Changing the Network Configuration 15-1

    Overview of Changing the Network Configuration 15-2

    About the chghost Utility 15-3

    Changing the Host Name or IP Address of Oracle Fusion Middleware 15-6

    Moving Oracle Fusion Middleware to a New Host 15-7

    Moving a Multinode Oracle Fusion Middleware to New Hosts 15-9

    xiii

  • Changing the Host Name or IP Address of a Database 15-12

    Moving an Oracle Fusion Middleware Database to a New Host 15-12

    Moving a Multinode Oracle Fusion Middleware and Its Database to New Hosts 15-13

    Additional Tasks for Changing the Network Configuration 15-15

    Additional Tasks for Changing the Network Configuration of Oracle FormsServices 15-15

    Moving Between On-Network and Off-Network 15-15

    Moving from Off-Network to On-Network (Static IP Address) 15-16

    Moving from Off-Network to On-Network (DHCP) 15-16

    Moving from On-Network to Off-Network (Static IP Address) 15-16

    Changing Between a Static IP Address and DHCP 15-16

    Changing from a Static IP Address to DHCP 15-17

    Changing from DHCP to a Static IP Address 15-17

    Using IPv6 15-17

    Configuring Oracle HTTP Server for IPv6 15-17

    Using Dual Stack with Oracle SOA Suite, Oracle Identity Governance, andFusion Middleware Control 15-18

    Part VII Advanced Administration: Backup and Recovery

    16

    Introduction to Backup and Recovery

    About Oracle Fusion Middleware Backup and Recovery 16-1

    Impact of Administration Server Failure 16-2

    Managed Server Independence (MSI) Mode 16-2

    Configuration Changes in Managed Servers 16-3

    Oracle Fusion Middleware Directory Structure 16-3

    Tools to Use for Backup and Recovery 16-4

    Backup and Recovery Recommendations for Oracle Fusion MiddlewareComponents 16-5

    Backup and Recovery Considerations for Oracle WebLogic Server JMS 16-13

    Backup and Recovery Recommendations for Oracle BPEL Process Manager 16-15

    Assumptions and Restrictions for Backup and Recovery 16-15

    17

    Backing Up Your Environment

    Overview of Backup Strategies 17-1

    Types of Backups 17-1

    Backup Artifacts 17-2

    Recommended Backup Strategy 17-2

    Limitations and Restrictions for Backing Up Data 17-4

    xiv

  • Performing a Backup 17-5

    Performing a Full Offline Backup 17-6

    Performing an Online Backup of Run-Time Artifacts 17-7

    Backing Up Windows Registry Entries 17-8

    Creating a Record of Your Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration 17-8

    18

    Recovering Your Environment

    Overview of Recovery Strategies 18-1

    Types of Recovery 18-1

    Recommended Recovery Strategies 18-2

    Recovering After Data Loss, Corruption, Media Failure, or Application Malfunction 18-4

    Recovering the Oracle Home 18-5

    Recovering an Oracle WebLogic Server Domain 18-5

    Recovering Oracle WebLogic Server with Whole Server Migration 18-6

    Recovering a Standalone Domain 18-6

    Recovering the Administration Server Configuration 18-7

    Recovering a Managed Server 18-8

    Recovering a Component 18-9

    Recovering Oracle Platform Security Services 18-10

    Recovering Oracle B2B 18-10

    Recovering Oracle Identity Governance 18-10

    Recovering Oracle Access Management Access Manager 18-11

    Recovering Oracle WebCenter Portal's Analytics 18-11

    Recovering Oracle WebCenter Content 18-11

    Recovering Oracle BI Enterprise Edition 18-11

    Recovering a Cluster 18-12

    Recovering Applications 18-13

    Recovering Application Artifacts 18-14

    Recovering a Java EE Application 18-14

    Recovering a Database 18-14

    Recovering After Loss of Host 18-15

    Recovering After Loss of Oracle WebLogic Server Domain Host 18-15

    Recovering After Loss of Standalone Domain Host 18-15

    Recovering a Standalone Domain to the Same Host 18-15

    Recovering a Standalone Domain to a Different Host 18-15

    Recovering After Loss of Administration Server Host 18-16

    Recovering the Administration Server to the Same Host 18-16

    Recovering the Administration Server to a Different Host 18-17

    Recovering After Loss of Managed Server Host 18-18

    Recovering a Managed Server to the Same Host 18-19

    xv

  • Recovering a Managed Server to a Different Host 18-20

    Recovering After Loss of Component Host 18-22

    Recovering a Java Component to the Same or Different Host 18-23

    Recovering a Java Component to a Different Host 18-23

    Recovering a System Component to the Same or Different Host 18-23

    Recovering Oracle SOA Suite After Loss of Host 18-24

    Recovering Web Tier Components to a Different Host 18-25

    Recovering Oracle Forms Services to a Different Host 18-26

    Recovering Oracle Reports to a Different Host 18-26

    Recovering Oracle BI Enterprise Edition to a Different Host 18-27

    Recovering Oracle Business Intelligence Publisher to a Different Host 18-30

    Recovering Oracle Data Integrator to a Different Host 18-31

    Recovering Oracle WebCenter Content to a Different Host 18-32

    Recovering Identity Management Components to a Different Host 18-32

    Additional Actions for Recovering Entities After Loss of Host 18-37

    Recovering Fusion Middleware Control to a Different Host 18-37

    Modifying the mod_wl_ohs.conf File 18-37

    Creating a New Machine for Certain Components 18-38

    Reassociating Users to Groups for Certain Identity ManagementComponents 18-39

    Updating Oracle Inventory 18-39

    Recovering the Windows Registry 18-39

    Recovering After Loss of Database Host 18-39

    Part VIII Advanced Administration: Expanding Your Environment

    19

    Scaling Up Your Environment

    Overview of Scaling Up Your Environment 19-1

    Extending a Domain to Support Additional Components 19-2

    Adding Managed Servers to a Domain 19-3

    Applying Oracle JRF Template to a Managed Server or Cluster 19-4

    Creating Clusters 19-5

    Using Elasticity and Dynamic Clusters for On-Demand Scaling 19-6

    Creating a Standalone Domain and a System Component 19-7

    Creating a System Component Instance in a WebLogic Server Domain 19-7

    Part IX Appendixes

    xvi

  • A Copy and Paste Binary Files ScriptsAbout the Copy and Paste Binary Files Scripts A-1

    Syntax for the Copy and Paste Binary Files Scripts A-2

    copyBinary Script A-2

    pasteBinary Script A-4

    B Oracle Fusion Middleware Command-Line Tools

    C URLs for Components

    D Port NumbersPort Numbers by Component D-1

    Port Numbers (Sorted by Number) D-2

    E Using Oracle Fusion Middleware Accessibility OptionsInstall and Configure Java Access Bridge (Windows Only) E-1

    Enabling Fusion Middleware Control Accessibility Mode E-1

    Making HTML Pages More Accessible E-2

    Viewing Text Descriptions of Fusion Middleware Control Charts E-2

    Fusion Middleware Control Keyboard Navigation E-2

    F Viewing Release NumbersRelease Number Format F-1

    Viewing the Software Inventory and Release Numbers F-2

    Viewing Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Release Numbers F-2

    Viewing Oracle WebLogic Server Release Numbers F-3

    Viewing Component Release Numbers F-3

    Viewing Oracle Internet Directory Release Numbers F-3

    Viewing Metadata Repository Release Numbers F-4

    Viewing Schema Release Numbers F-5

    G orapkiUsing the orapki Utility for Certificate and CRL Management G-1

    orapki Overview G-2

    Displaying orapki Help G-3

    xvii

  • Creating Signed Certificates for Testing Purposes G-3

    Managing Oracle Wallets with the orapki Utility G-4

    Managing Certificate Revocation Lists with orapki Utility G-15

    orapki Utility Commands Summary G-18

    H Troubleshooting Oracle Fusion MiddlewareDiagnosing Oracle Fusion Middleware Problems H-1

    Troubleshooting Common Problems and Solutions H-1

    Running Out of Data Source Connections H-2

    Using a Different Version of Spring H-2

    ClassNotFound Errors When Starting Managed Servers H-3

    Troubleshooting SSL H-3

    Troubleshooting FIPS Configuration H-4

    Need More Help? H-4

    Using Remote Diagnostic Agent H-4

    xviii

  • List of Figures

    6-1 SSL Handshake 6-6

    6-2 SSL in Oracle Fusion Middleware 6-7

    8-1 Selecting a FIPS 140 Provider 8-4

    13-1 ADR Directory Structure for Oracle Fusion Middleware 13-5

    13-2 Incident Creation Generated by Incident Log Detector 13-8

    13-3 Incident Creation Generated by WLDF WLDF Policies and Actions 13-9

    13-4 Flow for Investigating a Problem 13-23

    17-1 Decision Flow Chart for Type of Backup 17-4

    F-1 Example of an Oracle Fusion Middleware Release Number F-1

    xix

  • List of Tables

    2-1 Comparing Fusion Middleware Control and WebLogic Server Administration Console 2-2

    2-2 Navigating Within Fusion Middleware Control 2-9

    2-3 Roles Supported by Fusion Middleware Control 2-10

    2-4 Privileges for the Supported Roles 2-11

    2-5 WLST Commands for System Components 2-17

    6-1 TLS v1.2 Support in Oracle Fusion Middleware Components 6-9

    6-2 SSL with JKS 6-24

    7-1 Keystore Types in Oracle Fusion Middleware 7-2

    8-1 Components with FIPS 140-2 Support in Oracle Fusion Middleware 8-5

    8-2 FIPS 140-2 Scenarios 8-7

    9-1 Oracle JDeveloper Extensions 9-5

    10-1 Tools to Deploy Applications 10-3

    10-2 MDS Configuration Attributes for Deployed Applications 10-33

    12-1 ODL Format Message Fields 12-4

    12-2 Log File Location for Oracle Fusion Middleware Components 12-5

    12-3 Diagnostic Message Types and Level 12-18

    12-4 Mapping of Log Levels Among ODL, Oracle WebLogic Server, and Java 12-19

    13-1 DiagnosticConfig MBean Attributes for Diagnostic Framework 13-10

    13-2 Conditions for the LogDetectionConditions Element 13-14

    13-3 Optional Arguments for the defaultActions Element 13-14

    13-4 Attributes for the ruleCondition Element 13-15

    13-5 DiagnosticConfig MBean Operations and Attributes for Problem Suppression Filters 13-17

    13-6 Uncaught Exception Problem Keys 13-27

    13-7 Diagnostic Dump Actions 13-29

    13-8 Default Diagnostic Dump Samplings Configuration 13-30

    14-1 MDS Operations and Required Roles 14-6

    14-2 Purging Data Documentation 14-28

    15-1 Options for the chghost Command 15-4

    16-1 Backup and Recovery Recommendations 16-6

    18-1 Additional Recovery Procedures for Particular Components 18-3

    A-1 Copy and Paste Binary Files Scripts A-1

    A-2 Options for the copyBinary Script A-3

    A-3 Options for the pasteBinary Script A-5

    B-1 Oracle Fusion Middleware Command-Line Tools B-1

    C-1 URLs for Components C-1

    xx

  • D-1 Port Numbers Sorted by Component D-1

    D-2 Port Numbers Sorted by Number D-2

    E-1 Keyboard Navigation for Common Tasks E-3

    G-1 Trust Flags in Oracle Wallet Certificates G-9

    xxi

  • Preface

    This guide describes how to manage Oracle Fusion Middleware, including how to startand stop Oracle Fusion Middleware, how to change ports, deploy applications, how toback up and recover Oracle Fusion Middleware and how to move your environmentfrom a source environment, such as a test environment, to a target environment, suchas a production environment.

    • Audience

    • Documentation Accessibility

    • Related Documents

    • Conventions

    AudienceThis guide is intended for administrators of Oracle Fusion Middleware.

    Documentation AccessibilityFor information about Oracle's commitment to accessibility, visit theOracle Accessibility Program website at http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=docacc.

    Access to Oracle Support

    Oracle customers that have purchased support have access to electronic supportthrough My Oracle Support. For information, visit http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=info or visit http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=trsif you are hearing impaired.

    Related DocumentsFor more information, see the following documents in the Oracle Fusion Middlewaredocumentation set:

    • Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware

    • Securing Applications with Oracle Platform Security Services

    • High Availability Guide

    • Understanding Oracle WebLogic Server

    • Tuning Performance

    • Administering Oracle SOA Suite and Oracle Business Process Management Suite

    Preface

    xxii

    http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=docacchttp://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=docacchttp://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=infohttp://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=infohttp://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=trs

  • • Administering Oracle HTTP Server

    • Administering Web Services

    ConventionsThe following text conventions are used in this document:

    Convention Meaning

    boldface Boldface type indicates graphical user interface elements associatedwith an action, or terms defined in text or the glossary.

    italic Italic type indicates book titles, emphasis, or placeholder variables forwhich you supply particular values.

    monospace Monospace type indicates commands within a paragraph, URLs, codein examples, text that appears on the screen, or text that you enter.

    Preface

    xxiii

  • Part IAbout Oracle Fusion Middleware

    Before you begin working with Oracle Fusion Middleware you need to understandsome basic concepts as they relate to administering Oracle Fusion Middleware

    • Introduction to Oracle Fusion Middleware

  • 1Introduction to Oracle Fusion Middleware

    Oracle Fusion Middleware is a comprehensive family of products ranging fromapplication development tools and integration solutions to identity management,collaboration, and business intelligence reporting. This chapter provides anintroduction to Oracle Fusion Middleware.For definitions of unfamiliar terms found in this and other books, see the Glossary.

    • What Is Oracle Fusion Middleware?Oracle Fusion Middleware is a collection of standards-based software productsthat spans a range of tools and services: from Java EE and developertools, to integration services, identity management, business intelligence, andcollaboration.

    • Oracle Fusion Middleware ComponentsOracle Fusion Middleware Oracle WebLogic Serverprovides a wide variety ofcomponents, such as Oracle WebLogic Server, Oracle SOA Suite, and OracleHTTP Server.

    What Is Oracle Fusion Middleware?Oracle Fusion Middleware is a collection of standards-based software products thatspans a range of tools and services: from Java EE and developer tools, to integrationservices, identity management, business intelligence, and collaboration.

    Oracle Fusion Middleware offers complete support for development, deployment, andmanagement.

    Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware describes Oracle Fusion Middlewareconcepts.

    Oracle Fusion Middleware ComponentsOracle Fusion Middleware Oracle WebLogic Serverprovides a wide variety ofcomponents, such as Oracle WebLogic Server, Oracle SOA Suite, and Oracle HTTPServer.

    Some of the components include:

    • Oracle WebLogic Server is an enterprise-ready Java application server thatsupports the deployment of mission-critical applications in a robust, secure,highly available, and scalable environment. Oracle WebLogic Server is an idealfoundation for building applications based on service-oriented architecture (SOA).

    See Understanding Weblogic Server.

    • Oracle Application Development Framework (Oracle ADF) is an end-to-endapplication framework that builds on Java EE standards and open-sourcetechnologies to simplify and accelerate implementing enterprise applications.Oracle ADF is suitable for enterprise developers who want to create applications

    1-1

    https://docs.oracle.com/en/middleware/fusion-middleware/weblogic-server/12.2.1.4/intro/intro.html#GUID-64D4DCDA-3F25-4A5E-B658-EEB6170AFD85

  • that search, display, create, modify, and validate data using web, mobile, anddesktop interfaces.

    See Overview of Oracle ADF in Understanding Oracle Application DevelopmentFramework.

    • Oracle SOA Suite is a complete set of service infrastructure components, in aservice-oriented architecture, for designing, deploying, and managing compositeapplications. Oracle SOA Suite enables services to be created, managed, andorchestrated into composite applications and business processes. Compositesenable you to easily assemble multiple technology components into one SOAcomposite application.

    See Administering Oracle SOA Suite and Oracle Business Process ManagementSuite.

    • Oracle HTTP Server provides a Web listener for Java EE applications and theframework for hosting static and dynamic pages and applications over the Web.Based on the proven technology of the Apache HTTP Server, Oracle HTTP Serverincludes significant enhancements that facilitate load balancing, administration,and configuration.

    See Administering Oracle HTTP Server.

    • Oracle Web Services Manager provides a way to centrally define andmanage policies that govern Web services operations, including accesscontrol (authentication and authorization), reliable messaging, MessageTransmission Optimization Mechanism (MTOM), WS-Addressing, and Webservices management. Policies can be attached to multiple Web services,requiring no modification to the existing Web services.

    See Administering Web Services.

    • Oracle Platform Security provides enterprise product development teams, systemsintegrators, and independent software vendors (ISVs) with a standards-based,portable, integrated, enterprise-grade security framework for Java StandardEdition (Java SE) and Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) applications.

    Oracle Platform Security provides an abstraction layer in the form of standards-based application programming interfaces (APIs) that insulate developers fromsecurity and identity management implementation details. With Oracle PlatformSecurity, developers do not need to know the details of cryptographic keymanagement or interfaces with user repositories and other identity managementinfrastructures. When you use Oracle Platform Security, in-house developedapplications, third-party applications, and integrated applications benefit fromthe same uniform security, identity management, and audit services across theenterprise.

    See Securing Applications with Oracle Platform Security Services.

    • Oracle Identity Management enables organizations to effectively manage the end-to-end lifecycle of user identities across all enterprise resources, both within andbeyond the firewall and into the cloud. The Oracle Identity Management platformdelivers scalable solutions for identity governance, access management anddirectory services. This modern platform helps organizations strengthen security,simplify compliance, and capture business opportunities around mobile and socialaccess.

    For more information about integrating Oracle Identity Management components,see Introduction to IdM Suite Components Integration in Integration Guide forOracle Identity Management Suite.

    Chapter 1Oracle Fusion Middleware Components

    1-2

    https://docs.oracle.com/en/middleware/idm/suite/12.2.1.3/idmig/introduction-idm-suite-components-integration.html#GUID-4AEAEA72-569C-4926-B40A-8B5164D2DA2F

  • Oracle Data Integrator provides a fully unified solution for building, deploying,and managing complex data warehouses or as part of data-centric architecturesin a SOA or business intelligence environment. In addition, it combines allthe elements of data integration — data movement, data synchronization, dataquality, data management, and data services—to ensure that information is timely,accurate, and consistent across complex systems.

    See Administering Oracle Data Integrator.

    • Oracle WebCenter Portal is an integrated set of components with which youcan create social applications, enterprise portals, collaborative communities, andcomposite applications, built on a standards-based, service-oriented architecture.Oracle WebCenter Portal combines dynamic user interface technologies withwhich to develop rich internet applications, the flexibility and power of anintegrated, multi-channel portal framework, and a set of tools and servicesthat provide content, collaboration, presence and social networking capabilities.Based on these components, Oracle WebCenter Portal also provides an out-of-the-box enterprise-ready customizable application called WebCenter Portal, witha configurable work environment that enables individuals and groups to work andcollaborate more effectively.

    See Administering Oracle WebCenter Portal.

    • Oracle WebCenter Content is an integrated suite of applications designed formanaging content. Oracle WebCenter Content contains the Oracle WebCenterContent Server, which is used to manage the content repository. OracleWebCenter Content can help a corporation unify, manage, and leverage all typesof content across the entire enterprise. All corporate lines of business such asmarketing, brand management, web presence, sales, Human Resources, andengineering can share the same tools and easily access the same information in acommon repository.

    See Understanding Oracle WebCenter Content Concepts.

    • Oracle Business Intelligence is a complete, integrated solution that addressesbusiness intelligence requirements. Oracle Business Intelligence includes OracleBI Enterprise Edition, Oracle Business Intelligence Publisher, and Oracle Real-Time Decisions.

    See System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Business Intelligence EnterpriseEdition

    Chapter 1Oracle Fusion Middleware Components

    1-3

  • Part IIBasic Administration

    Basic administration tasks include using Fusion Middleware Control, theAdministration Console, and WLST commands. They also include managing wiring,starting and stopping components, and managing ports.

    • Getting Started Managing Oracle Fusion Middleware

    • Wiring Components to Work TogetherService providers can publish endpoint information about their services, andclients of these services to query and bind to these services. You can wireparticular Oracle Fusion Middleware components together and you can changethe current wiring of components.

    • Starting and Stopping Oracle Fusion MiddlewareYou can start and stop Oracle Fusion Middleware, including the AdministrationServer, Managed Servers, and components.

    • Managing Ports

  • 2Getting Started Managing Oracle FusionMiddleware

    When you install Oracle Fusion Middleware, you install the binary files, such asexecutable files, jar files, and libraries. Then, you use configuration tools to configurethe software.This chapter provides information you need to get started managing Oracle FusionMiddleware, including information about the tools you use.

    • Overview of Oracle Fusion Middleware Administration ToolsAfter you install and configure Oracle Fusion Middleware, you can use thegraphical user interfaces or command-line tools to manage your environment.

    • Getting Started Using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware ControlFusion Middleware Control is a Web browser-based, graphical user interfacethat you can use to monitor and administer your domain. It can manage an OracleWebLogic Server domain with its Administration Server, one or more ManagedServers, clusters, the Oracle Fusion Middleware components that are installed,configured, and running in the domain, and the applications you deploy.

    • Getting Started Using Oracle WebLogic Server Administration ConsoleOracle WebLogic Server Administration Console is a Web browser-based,graphical user interface that you use to manage an Oracle WebLogic Serverdomain. It is accessible from any supported Web browser with network access tothe Administration Server.

    • Getting Started Using the Oracle WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST)The Oracle WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST) is a command-line scriptingenvironment that you can use to create, manage, and monitor Oracle WebLogicServer domains. It is based on the Java scripting interpreter, Jython.

    • Getting Started Using the Fusion Middleware Control MBean BrowsersA managed bean (MBean) is a Java object that represents a JMX manageableresource in a distributed environment, such as an application, a service, acomponent or a device.

    • Changing the Administrative User PasswordDuring the Oracle Fusion Middleware installation, you must specify a passwordfor the administration account. Then, you can use this account to log in to FusionMiddleware Control and the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console forthe first time. You can create additional administrative accounts using the WLSTcommand line or the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.

    • Configuring Node ManagerNode Manager allows you to perform common operations, such as startingand stopping a Managed Server, using the Administration Console or FusionMiddleware Control.

    • Basic Tasks for Configuring and Managing Oracle Fusion MiddlewareThere are several tasks you need to take to configure and manage a basic OracleFusion Middleware environment after you have installed the software.

    2-1

  • Overview of Oracle Fusion Middleware Administration ToolsAfter you install and configure Oracle Fusion Middleware, you can use the graphicaluser interfaces or command-line tools to manage your environment.

    Oracle offers the following primary tools for managing your Oracle Fusion Middlewareinstallations:

    • Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control. See Getting Started UsingOracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control.

    • Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console. See Getting Started UsingOracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.

    • The Oracle Fusion Middleware command-line tools. See Getting Started Using theOracle WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST).

    • The Fusion Middleware Control MBean Browser. See Getting Started Using theFusion Middleware Control MBean Browsers.

    Note that you should use these tools, rather than directly editing configuration files, toperform all administrative tasks unless a specific procedure requires you to edit a file.Editing a file may cause the settings to be inconsistent and generate problems.

    Both Fusion Middleware Control and Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Consoleare graphical user interfaces that you can use to monitor and administer your OracleFusion Middleware environment. You can install Fusion Middleware Control and theAdministration Console when you install most Oracle Fusion Middleware components.

    Note the following:

    • If you install a standalone Oracle WebLogic Server, Fusion Middleware Control isnot installed. Only the Administration Console is installed.

    • If you install Oracle JDeveloper, neither Fusion Middleware Control or theAdministration Console are installed. They can be installed if you install OracleFusion Middleware Application Developer.

    You can perform some tasks with either tool, but for other tasks, you can only use oneof the tools. Table 2-1 lists some common tasks and the recommended tool.

    Table 2-1 Comparing Fusion Middleware Control and WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Task Tool to Use

    Create additional Managed Servers Fusion Middleware Control

    Clone Managed Servers WebLogic Server Administration Console

    Cluster Managed Servers Fusion Middleware Control

    Start and stop Oracle WebLogicServer

    Fusion Middleware Control or WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Add users and groups Fusion Middleware Control or WebLogic ServerAdministration Console if using the default embeddedLDAP; if using another LDAP server, use the LDAPserver's tool

    Start and stop components Fusion Middleware Control

    Chapter 2Overview of Oracle Fusion Middleware Administration Tools

    2-2

  • Table 2-1 (Cont.) Comparing Fusion Middleware Control and WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Task Tool to Use

    Start and stop applications Fusion Middleware Control

    View and manage log files Fusion Middleware Control for most log files

    WebLogic Server Administration Console for thefollowing logs:

    DOMAIN_HOME/servers/server_name/data/ldap/log/EmbeddedLDAP.logDOMAIN_HOME/servers/server_name/data/ldap/log/EmbeddedLDAPAccess.log

    Change ports Fusion Middleware Control or WebLogic ServerAdministration Console for Oracle WebLogic Server andJava components

    For some system components, Fusion MiddlewareControl. See the administration guide for the component.

    Manage Oracle HTTP Server Fusion Middleware Control

    Create data sources Fusion Middleware Control or WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Create connection pools Fusion Middleware Control or WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Browse JNDI objects Fusion Middleware Control or WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Create JMS queues Fusion Middleware Control or WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Configure JMS advanced queuing Fusion Middleware Control or WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Configure JMS resources Fusion Middleware Control or WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Create and manage domainpartitions

    Fusion Middleware Control

    Note:

    WebLogic ServerMultitenant domainpartitions are deprecatedin WebLogic Server12.2.1.4.0 and will beremoved in the nextrelease.

    Chapter 2Overview of Oracle Fusion Middleware Administration Tools

    2-3

  • Table 2-1 (Cont.) Comparing Fusion Middleware Control and WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Task Tool to Use

    Manage virtual targets Fusion Middleware Control

    Note:

    WebLogic ServerMultitenant virtualtargets are deprecatedin WebLogic Server12.2.1.4.0 and will beremoved in the nextrelease.

    Control resource sharing Fusion Middleware Control

    Create resource group templatesand resource groups

    Fusion Middleware Control

    Note:

    WebLogic ServerMultitenant resourcegroups and resourcegroup templates aredeprecated in WebLogicServer 12.2.1.4.0 and willbe removed in the nextrelease.

    Deploy SOA Composite applications Fusion Middleware Control

    Monitor SOA Composite applications Fusion Middleware Control

    Modify Oracle BPEL ProcessManager MBean properties

    Fusion Middleware Control

    Debug applications such as OracleBPEL Process Manager applications

    Fusion Middleware Control

    Deploy ADF applications Fusion Middleware Control

    Deploy Java EE applications WebLogic Server Administration Console or FusionMiddleware Control

    Administer Oracle WebCenter Portal Fusion Middleware Control

    Deploy Oracle WebCenter Portalapplications

    Fusion Middleware Control

    Administer Oracle WebCenterContent

    Fusion Middleware Control

    Deploy Oracle WebCenter Contentapplications

    Fusion Middleware Control

    Administer Oracle WebCenter Sites Fusion Middleware Control

    Chapter 2Overview of Oracle Fusion Middleware Administration Tools

    2-4

  • Table 2-1 (Cont.) Comparing Fusion Middleware Control and WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Task Tool to Use

    Deploy Oracle WebCenter Sitesapplications

    Fusion Middleware Control

    Configure and manage auditing Fusion Middleware Control

    Configure SSL WebLogic Server Administration Console for OracleWebLogic Server

    Fusion Middleware Control. See Configuring SSL inOracle Fusion Middleware.

    Change passwords Fusion Middleware Control or WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Getting Started Using Oracle Enterprise Manager FusionMiddleware Control

    Fusion Middleware Control is a Web browser-based, graphical user interface thatyou can use to monitor and administer your domain. It can manage an OracleWebLogic Server domain with its Administration Server, one or more ManagedServers, clusters, the Oracle Fusion Middleware components that are installed,configured, and running in the domain, and the applications you deploy.

    Fusion Middleware Control organizes a wide variety of performance data andadministrative functions into distinct, Web-based home pages for the domain, servers,components, and applications. The Fusion Middleware Control home pages makeit easy to locate the most important monitoring data and the most commonly usedadministrative functions—all from your Web browser.

    • Displaying Fusion Middleware Control

    • Using Fusion Middleware Control Help

    • Navigating Within Fusion Middleware Control

    • About Users and Roles for Fusion Middleware Control

    • Locking the WebLogic Server Configuration

    • Viewing and Managing the WebLogic Domain

    • Viewing and Managing Java Components

    • Viewing and Managing System Components

    Displaying Fusion Middleware ControlTo display Fusion Middleware Control, you enter the Fusion Middleware Control URL,which includes the name of the host and the administration port number assignedduring the installation. The following shows the format of the URL:

    http://hostname.domain:port/em

    Chapter 2Getting Started Using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control

    2-5

  • The port number is the port number of the Administration Server. By default, the portnumber is 7001. The port number is listed in the following file:

    DOMAIN_HOME/config/config.xml

    For some installation types, such as Web Tier, if you saved the installation informationby clicking Save on the last installation screen, the URL for Fusion Middleware Controlis included in the file that is written to disk (by default to your home directory). Forother installation types, the information is displayed on the Create Domain screen ofthe Configuration Wizard when the configuration completes.

    To display Fusion Middleware Control:

    1. Enter the URL in your Web browser. For example:

    http://host1.example.com:7001/em

    2. Enter the Oracle Fusion Middleware administrator user name and password andclick Login.

    Using Fusion Middleware Control HelpAt any time while using the Fusion Middleware Control, you can select Help from theusername menu at the top of the page to get more information. From the Help menu,you can select the following:

    • Contents, which lists the contents of Help.

    • Help for This Page, which provides context-sensitive help for the current page.

    • How Do I?, which links to tutorial information in the documentation.

    • Documentation Library, which links to the library on the Oracle TechnologyNetwork.

    • User Forums, which links to Discussion Forums on the Oracle TechnologyNetwork.

    • Oracle Technology Network, which links to the Oracle Technology Network.

    Navigating Within Fusion Middleware ControlWhen you log into Fusion Middleware Control, it displays boxes showing the servers,clusters, and deployments on the left and the domain home page on the right, asshown in the following figure:

    Chapter 2Getting Started Using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control

    2-6

  • To view the target navigation pane, click the target navigation icon near the left topcorner. Fusion Middleware Control displays the target navigation pane on the left andthe content pane on the right.

    From the target navigation pane, you can expand the tree and select an OracleWebLogic Server domain, an Oracle WebLogic Server Managed Server, a component,an application, or a Metadata Repository.

    The following figure shows the target navigation pane, with the right-click contextmenu:

    Chapter 2Getting Started Using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control

    2-7

  • If your domain contains partitions, Fusion Middleware Control shows the partitions inthe navigation tree. However, if a partition is not fully configured with a virtual targetand resource group, the partition will not be displayed in the navigation tree.

    Note:

    WebLogic Server Multitenant domain partitions, resource groups, resourcegroup templates, and virtual targets are deprecated in WebLogic Server12.2.1.4.0 and will be removed in the next release.

    When you select a target, such as a Managed Server or a component, the target'shome page is displayed in the content pane and that target's menu is displayed at thetop of the page, in the context pane. For example, if you select a Managed Server,the WebLogic Server menu is displayed. You can also view the menu for a target byright-clicking the target in the navigation pane.

    The following figure shows the home page of an Managed Server. Because aManaged Server was selected, the dynamic target menu listed in the context paneis the WebLogic Server menu.

    In the preceding figures, the following items are called out:

    Chapter 2Getting Started Using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control

    2-8

  • • Dynamic Target Menu provides a list of operations that you can perform on thecurrently selected target. The menu that is displayed depends on the target youselect. The menu for a specific target contains the same operations as those in theRight-Click Target Menu.

    • Change Center shows the changes made and allows you to lock and edit theconfiguration, release the configuration, activate changes, undo all changes, andchange preferences. It also allows you to start and stop recording your session,and view the recording.

    • WebLogic Domain Menu provides a list of operations that you can perform on thedomain. The WebLogic Domain menu is always available.

    • Target Name is the name of the currently selected target.

    • Target Information Icon provides information about the target. For example, for adomain, it displays the target name, the version, and the domain home.

    • Target Navigation icon expands to list all of the targets in the domain in anavigation tree.

    • Context Pane provides the name of the target, the name of the current user, thehost name, and the time of the last page refresh, as well as the Refresh icon.

    • Content Pane shows the current page for the target. When you first select atarget, that target's home page is displayed.

    • The username menu provides links to Help, Accessibility, information aboutFusion Middleware Control, and logging out.

    • Refresh indicates when the page is being refreshed. Click it to refresh a pagewith new data. (Refreshing the browser window refreshes the page but does notretrieve new data.)

    • Right-Click Target Menu, which you access from the target navigation pane,provides a list of operations that you can perform on the currently selectedtarget. The menu is displayed when you right-click the target name in the targetnavigation pane. In the figure, even though the WebLogic Server is selected andits home page is displayed, the right-click target menu displays the operations fora metadata repository because the user has right-clicked the metadata repository.

    The menu for a specific target contains the same operations as those in theDynamic Target Menu.

    • View lets you expand or collapse the navigation tree.

    In addition, from the home pages of targets such as the Administration Server orManaged Servers, you can access the WebLogic Server Administration Console.

    Table 2-2 describes some common ways you can navigate within Fusion MiddlewareControl.

    Table 2-2 Navigating Within Fusion Middleware Control

    To: Take This Action:

    View all of the targets in thedomain

    From the View menu, select Expand All.

    Operate on the domain Select the WebLogic Domain menu, which is alwaysavailable at the top right of Fusion Middleware Control.

    Chapter 2Getting Started Using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control

    2-9

  • Table 2-2 (Cont.) Navigating Within Fusion Middleware Control

    To: Take This Action:

    Operate on a target Right-click the target in the target navigation pane. Thetarget menu is displayed.

    Alternatively, you can select the target and use the dynamictarget menu in the context pane.

    Return to the target's homepage

    Click the target name at the top left-hand corner of thecontext pane.

    Refresh a page with new data Click the Refresh icon in the top right of the context pane.

    Return to a previous page Click the breadcrumbs, which appear below the contextpane. The breadcrumbs appear when you drill down in atarget. For example, choose Logs from the WebLogic Servermenu, then View Log Messages. Select a log file and clickView Log File. The breadcrumbs show:

    Log Messages > Log Files > View Log File: logfile_name

    View the host on which thetarget is running

    Select the target in the target navigation pane and view thehost name in the target's context pane. You can also viewthe host name by clicking the Target Information icon.

    View a server log file Right-click the server name in the target navigation pane.Choose Logs, and then View Log Messages to see asummary of log messages and to search log files.

    About Users and Roles for Fusion Middleware ControlTo access Fusion Middleware Control and perform tasks, you must have theappropriate role. Fusion Middleware Control uses the Oracle WebLogic Server securityrealm and the roles defined in that realm. If a user is not granted one of these roles,the user cannot access Fusion Middleware Control.

    Each role defines the type of access a user has, as described in Table 2-3.

    Table 2-3 Roles Supported by Fusion Middleware Control

    Role Actions Allowed

    Administrator All access. An administrator has full privileges, including creating anddeleting instances and modifying the configuration. In a multitenancyenvironment, if the Administrator is logged into a partition, the Administratorcan take actions only on the partition, as described in AdministrativeRoles for Configuration and Management in Using Oracle WebLogic ServerMultitenant.

    Note:

    WebLogic Server Multitenant domainpartitions are deprecated in WebLogic Server12.2.1.4.0 and will be removed in the nextrelease.

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  • Table 2-3 (Cont.) Roles Supported by Fusion Middleware Control

    Role Actions Allowed

    Deployer Deploy, undeploy, and redeploy applications, modify the configuration ofapplications, start and stop applications, create and delete JDBC and JMSresources, and modify JDBC and JMS resources, as well as all of theprivileges of the Monitor role.

    Operator Start and stop servers and applications, and all of the privileges of theMonitor role.

    Monitor View configuration, status of servers and applications, metrics, log files andlog messages.

    Table 2-4 summarizes the privileges of each role that is supported by FusionMiddleware Control.

    Table 2-4 Privileges for the Supported Roles

    Privileges Administrator Deployer Operator Monitor

    Edit session operations: startor release session, activate orundo changes

    Yes Yes No No

    Server, Cluster, Template,or Machine

    Lifecyle operations: create,delete

    Yes No No No

    Modify configuration Yes No No No

    Control operations: start,stop, resume

    Yes No Yes No

    View configuration Yes Yes Yes Yes

    Application Deployments

    Lifecycle operations: deploy,undeploy, redeploy

    Yes Yes No No

    Modify configuration Yes Yes No No

    Control operations: start, stop Yes Yes Yes No

    JDBC and JMS resources

    Lifecyle operations: create,delete

    Yes Yes No No

    Modify configuration Yes Yes No No

    Control operations: start, stop Yes No No No

    View configuration Yes Yes Yes Yes

    Startup and ShutdownClasses, CoherenceClusters

    Lifecyle operations: create,delete

    Yes No No No

    Modify configuration Yes Yes No No

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  • Table 2-4 (Cont.) Privileges for the Supported Roles

    Privileges Administrator Deployer Operator Monitor

    View configuration Yes Yes Yes Yes

    Note that the information in Table 2-4 is based on the default out-of-the-box securitypolicy for WebLogic Resources and MBeans. You can manage the default securitypolicies in the Administration Console, as described in Use Roles and Policies toSecure Resources in Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console Online Help.

    Understanding WebLogic Resource Security in Securing Resources Using Rolesand Policies for Oracle WebLogic Server provides more information about resourcesecurity.

    Locking the WebLogic Server ConfigurationBefore you make configuration changes, lock the domain configuration, so you canmake changes to the configuration while preventing other accounts from makingchanges during your edit session. To lock the domain configuration from FusionMiddleware Control:

    1. Locate the Change Center at the top of Fusion Middleware Control.

    2. From the Changes menu, select Lock & Edit to lock the configuration edithierarchy for the domain.

    As you make configuration changes using the Administration Console, you click Save(or in some cases Finish) on the appropriate pages. This does not cause the changesto take effect immediately. The changes take effect when you click Activate Changesin the Change Center. At that point, the configuration changes are distributed to eachof the servers in the domain. If the changes are acceptable to each of the servers,then they take effect. If any server cannot accept a change, then all of the changesare rolled back from all of the servers in the domain. The changes are left in a pendingstate; you can then either edit the pending changes to resolve the problem or revert tothe previous configuration.

    You can also lock the configuration by using the WLST command, startEdit:

    startEdit()

    For more information about the startEdit command and the stopEdit command, whichreleases locks, see startEdit and stopEdit in the WLST Command Reference forWebLogic Server.

    Viewing and Managing the WebLogic DomainWhen you log in to Fusion Middleware Control, the first page you see is the domainhome page. You can also view this page at any time by selecting Home in theWebLogic Domain menu.

    The following figure shows the domain home page:

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  • The WebLogic Domain menu is displayed at the top of the page. From this menu, youcan monitor and configure the domain.

    The WebLogic Domain menu is always displayed, even if you have selected otherentities.

    Viewing and Managing Java ComponentsFrom the target navigation pane, you can drill down to view and manage the Javacomponents in your domain.

    For example, to view and manage Oracle SOA Suite, take the following steps:

    1. Expand the target navigation pane, then expand SOA.

    2. Select the SOA soa_infra instance.

    The home page for the SOA instance is displayed, as shown in the followingfigure:

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  • 3. From the SOA Infrastructure menu, you can perform many administrative tasks,such as starting, stopping, and monitoring Oracle SOA Suite and deploying SOAcomposite applications.

    Monitoring a System Component provides more information about monitoringcomponents.

    Viewing and Managing System ComponentsYou can also view and manage system components. For example, to view andmanage Oracle HTTP Server, take the following steps:

    1. From the navigation pane, expand HTTP_Server.

    2. Select the Oracle HTTP Server instance, for example, ohs1.

    The home page for the Oracle HTTP Server ohs1 is displayed, as shown in thefollowing figure:

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  • 3. From the HTTP Server menu, you can perform many administrative tasks, such asstarting, stopping, and monitoring Oracle HTTP Server.

    Monitoring a System Component provides more information about monitoring systemcomponents.

    Getting Started Using Oracle WebLogic ServerAdministration Console

    Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console is a Web browser-based, graphicaluser interface that you use to manage an Oracle WebLogic Server domain. It isaccessible from any supported Web browser with network access to the AdministrationServer.

    Use the Administration Console to:

    • Configure, start, and stop WebLogic Server instances

    • Configure WebLogic Server clusters

    • Configure WebLogic Server services, such as database connectivity (JDBC) andmessaging (JMS)

    • Configure security parameters, including creating and managing users, groups,and roles

    • Configure and deploy Java EE applications

    • Monitor server and application performance

    • View server and domain log files

    • View application deployment descriptors

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  • • Edit selected run-time application deployment descriptor elements

    To display the Administration Console:

    1. Enter the following URL in a browser:

    http://hostname:port_number/console

    The port number is the port number of the Administration Server. By default, theport number is 7001.

    The login page is displayed.

    2. Log in using the user name and password supplied during installation or anotheradministrative user that you created.

    Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console is displayed.

    Alternatively, you can access the Administration Console from Fusion MiddlewareControl, from the WebLogic Server menu.

    Getting Started Using the Oracle WebLogic Scripting Tool(WLST)

    The Oracle WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST) is a command-line scripting environmentthat you can use to create, manage, and monitor Oracle WebLogic Server domains. Itis based on the Java scripting interpreter, Jython.

    In addition to supporting standard Jython features such as local variables, conditionalvariables, and flow-control statements, WLST provides a set of scripting functions(commands) that are specific to WebLogic Server. You can extend the WebLogicscripting language to suit your needs by following the Jython language syntax

    The following topics describe using WLST to manage Oracle Fusion Middlewarecomponents:

    • Using WLST with Java Components and Oracle Fusion Middleware Services

    • Using WLST Commands with System Components

    Using WLST with Java Components and Oracle Fusion MiddlewareServices

    You can use WLST commands with Java components, such as Oracle SOASuite, Oracle Platform Security Services (OPSS), Oracle Fusion Middleware AuditFramework, and MDS, and services such as SSL, logging, and the diagnosticframework.

    You can use WLST commands in the following ways:

    • Interactively, on the command line

    • In script mode, supplied in a file

    • Embedded in Java code

    The script is located at:

    (UNIX) ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin/wlst.sh(Windows) ORACLE_HOME\oracle_common\common\bin\wlst.cmd

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  • For example, to invoke WLST interactively, and connect to the WebLogic Server, usethe following commands:

    ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin/wlst.shconnect('username', 'password', 'localhost:7001')

    To display information about WLST commands and variables, enter the helpcommand. For example, to display a list of categories for online commands, enterthe following:

    wls:/base_domain/serverConfig> help('online') help('activate') Activate the changes. help('addListener') Add a JMX listener to the specified MBean. help('adminHome') Administration MBeanHome. help('cancelEdit') Cancel an edit session. help('cd') Navigate the hierarchy of beans. help('cmo') Current Management Object. . . .

    To monitor the status, you use the WLST state command, using the following format:

    state(name, type)

    For example to get the status of the Managed Server wls_server1, use the followingcommand:

    wls:/WLS_domain/serverConfig> state('wls_server1', 'Server')Current state of 'wls_server1' : RUNNING

    Introduction and Roadmap in the WLST Command Reference for WebLogic Serverprovides comprehensive information about WLST.

    Using WLST Commands with System ComponentsYou can use WLST commands with system components. The following component isa system component:

    • Oracle HTTP Server

    For system components, you can only the use the WLST commands listed inTable 2-5.

    Table 2-5 WLST Commands for System Components

    WLSTCommand

    Description Additional Information

    create Creates an instance ofthe system component withdefaults.

    The create command in WLST CommandReference for WebLogic Server

    displayLogs Displays the messages in alog file.

    The displayLogs command in WLSTCommand Reference for InfrastructureComponents and Viewing Log Files and TheirMessages Using WLST

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  • Table 2-5 (Cont.) WLST Commands for System Components

    WLSTCommand

    Description Additional Information

    displayMetricTableNames

    Displays the names of theDMS metric tables.

    The displayMetricTableNames command inWLST Command Reference for InfrastructureComponents

    displayMetricTables

    Displays the contents ofthe DMS metric tables.

    The displayMetricTables command in WLSTCommand Reference for InfrastructureComponents

    dumpMetrics Displays the available DMSmetrics.

    The dumpMetrics command in WLSTCommand Reference for InfrastructureComponents

    listLogs Lists the log files. The listLogs command in WLST CommandReference for Infrastructure Components andViewing Log Files and Their Messages UsingWLST

    nmKill Shuts down and instance. The nmkill command in WLST CommandReference for WebLogic Server and Startingand Stopping System Components

    nmServerStatus Returns the status on aninstance.

    The nmServerStatus command in WLSTCommand Reference for WebLogic Server

    nmStart Starts an instance. The nmStart command in WLST CommandReference for WebLogic Server and Startingand Stopping System Components

    shutdown Stops a system componentinstance.

    The shutdown command in WLST CommandReference for WebLogic Server and Startingand Stopping System Components

    start Starts a system componentinstance.

    The start command in WLST CommandReference for WebLogic Server and Startingand Stopping System Components

    state Returns the state ofa system componentinstance.

    The state command in WLST CommandReference for WebLogic Server and GettingStarted Using the Oracle WebLogic ScriptingTool (WLST)

    resync Resynchronizes theconfiguration of agiven system componentinstance in the domain.

    The resync command in WLST CommandReference for WebLogic Server

    resyncAll Resynchronizes theconfiguration of all systemcomponent instances in thedomain.

    The resyncAll command in WLST CommandReference for WebLogic Server

    showComponentChanges

    Displays the changesmade to a specified systemcomponent instance orto all system componentinstances in the domain.

    The showComponentChanges command inWLST Command Reference for WebLogicServer

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  • Table 2-5 (Cont.) WLST Commands for System Components

    WLSTCommand

    Description Additional Information

    pullComponentChanges

    Pulls the changes madeto the configuration ofa system componentinstance to the current editsession.

    The pullComponentChanges command inWLST Command Reference for WebLogicServer

    See WebLogic Server WLST Online and Offline Command Reference in the WLSTCommand Reference for WebLogic Server for information about whether a commandcan be invoked in online or offline mode.

    To use these commands, you must invoke the WLST script from the Oracle commonhome. The script is located at:

    (UNIX) ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin/wlst.sh(Windows) ORACLE_HOME\oracle_common\common\bin\wlst.cmd

    To monitor the status of a system component, you use the WLST state command,using the following format:

    state(component_ame, SystemComponent)

    In online mode, you can use the cmo variable to invoke MBean operations that provideeven more functionality. Changing the Current Management Object in Understandingthe WebLogic Scripting Tool describes the cmo variable.

    Getting Started Using the Fusion Middleware ControlMBean Browsers

    A managed bean (MBean) is a Java object that represents a JMX manageableresource in a distributed environment, such as an application, a service, a componentor a device.

    The following topics describe MBeans and how to view or configure MBeans:

    • About MBeans

    • Using the System MBean Browser

    • Using the MBeans for a Selected Application

    About MBeansMBeans are defined in the Java EE Management Specification (JSR-77), which is partof Java Management Extensions, or JMX, a set of specifications that allow standardinterfaces to be created for managing applications in a Java EE environment. Forinformation about JSR-77, see https://www.oracle.com/technetwork/es/java/javaee/tech/index.html.

    You can create MBeans for deployment with an application into Oracle WebLogicServer, enabling the application or its components to be managed and monitoredthrough Fusion Middleware Control.

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    https://www.oracle.com/technetwork/es/java/javaee/tech/index.htmlhttps://www.oracle.com/technetwork/es/java/javaee/tech/index.html

  • Fusion Middleware Control provides a set of MBean browsers that allow to you browsethe MBeans for an Oracle WebLogic Server or for a selected application. You can alsoperform specific monitoring and configuration tasks from the MBean browser.

    The MBeans are organized into three groups: Configuration MBeans, RuntimeMBeans, and Application-Defined MBeans.

    Understanding WebLogic Server MBeans in Developing Custom Management UtilitiesUsing JMX for Oracle WebLogic Server describes WebLogic MBeans.

    Using the System MBean BrowserYou can view the System MBean Browser for many entities, including an OracleWebLogic Server domain, an Administration Server, a Managed Server, or anapplication. You can search for an MBean, filter the list of MBeans, and refresh thelist of MBeans in the MBean navigation tree.

    To view the System MBean Browser specific to a particular Oracle WebLogic ServerManaged Server and to configure and use the MBeans:

    1. From the target navigation pane, expand the domain.

    2. From the domain home page, select the Managed Server.

    3. From the WebLogic Server menu, choose System MBean Browser.

    The System MBean Browser page is displayed.

    4. Expand a node in the MBean navigation tree and drill down to the MBean youwant to access. Select an MBean instance.

    If you do not know the location of an MBean, you can search for the MBean:

    a. Click the Find icon at the top of the MBean navigation tree.

    b. For Find, select MBean Name.

    You can also select Attributes, Operations, or JMX syntax.

    c. Enter the name of the MBean and click the search icon.

    5. To view the MBean's attributes, select the Attributes tab. Some attributes allow youto change their values. To do so, enter the value in the Value column.

    6. To view the available operations, select the Operations tab. To perform anoperation, click the operation. The Operations page appears. Enter any applicablevalues and click Invoke.

    The Fusion Middleware Control online help provides additional information about theMBean browser.

    Using the MBeans for a Selected ApplicationYou can view, configure, and use the MBeans for a specific application by takingthe steps described in Using the System MBean Browser, and drilling down to theapplication. As an alternative, you can navigate to an application's MBeans using thefollowing steps:

    1. From the target navigation pane, expand Application Deployments.

    2. Select the application.

    3. From the Application Deployments menu, choose System MBean Browser.

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  • The System MBean Browser page is displayed, along with the MBean informationfor the application.

    4. To view the MBean's attributes, select the Attributes tab. Some attributes allow youto change their values. To do so, enter the value in the Value column.

    5. To view the available operations, select the Operations tab. To perform anoperation, click the operation. The Operations page appears. Enter any applicablevalues and click Invoke.

    Changing the Administrative User PasswordDuring the Oracle Fusion Middleware installation, you must specify a password for theadministration account. Then, you can use this account to log in to Fusion MiddlewareControl and the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console for the first time. Youcan create additional administrative accounts using the WLST command line or theOracle WebLogic Server Administration Console.

    Understanding Users and Roles in the Securing Applications with Oracle PlatformSecurity Services describes users, roles, and changing passwords.

    You can change the password of the administrative user using the command line orthe Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, as described in the followingtopics:

    • Changing the Administrative User Password Using the Command Line

    • Changing the Administrative User Password Using Fusion Middleware Control

    Changing the Administrative User Password Using the Command LineTo change the administrative user password or other user passwords using thecommand line, you invoke the UserPasswordEditorMBean.changeUserPasswordmethod, which is extended by the security realm's AuthenticationProvider MBean.

    MBean Reference for Oracle WebLogic Server describes the changeUserPasswordmethod.

    Changing the Administrative User Password Using Fusion MiddlewareControl

    To change the password of an administrative user using Fusion Middleware Control:

    1. From the WebLogic Domain menu, select Security, then Security Realm.

    2. Select the Users and Groups tab.

    The Users and Groups page is displayed.

    3. Select the user.

    The Settings for user page is displayed.

    4. Select the Pas