young people, alcohol and influences: a study of young people and

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  • Young people, alcohol and influencesA study of young people and their relationship with alcohol

    Pamela Bremner, Jamie Burnett,Fay Nunney, Mohammed Ravat,Dr Willm MistralJune 2011

    This report presents the findings from a major study of young people and their relationship with alcohol, and explores the wide range of influences on their drinking.

    Where this study differs from other research is that it develops evidence of how different domains of influence work together, understanding their relative importance in tackling different patterns of drinking among different groups. The study involved a survey of 5,700 teenagers aged 1314 (Year 9) and 1516 (Year 11) in schools in England and data was statistically modelled using binary logistic regression to highlight the strongest influences on and predictors of young peoples drinking.

    The report:

    examines circumstances surrounding young peoples first time drinking, their current drinking patterns including levels of consumption, and their experiences of drunkenness; and

    develops our understanding of what really influences young peoples drinking patterns by identifying the domains and indicators that have the strongest relationship with their behaviour.

    www.jrf.org.uk

  • Contents

    List of figures and tables 4

    Executive summary 8

    1 Introduction 14

    2 Young peoples drinking patterns 22

    3 Explaining the statistical modelling 60

    4 The most important influences on different behaviours and groups 63

    5 Conclusion and implications for policy and practice 79

    Notes 83

    References 86

    List of appendices 89

    Acknowledgements and About the authors 90

  • 4 List of figures and tables

    List of figures and tables

    Figures

    Has had an alcoholic drink by year group 241

    Ten most frequently cited reasons for never having had an alcoholic drink by year group 242

    Has had an alcoholic drink by year group by gender 253

    Age when they had their first alcoholic drink by year group 254

    Frequency of drinking by year group 325

    When student last had an alcoholic drink by year group 336

    Number of drinks consumed last time drinking by year group 347

    Differences in the number of drinks consumed last time drinking by when the drinking took 8 place by year group 34

    Location last time drinking by year group 359

    Who student was with last time drinking by year group 3610

    Source of alcohol last time drinking by year group (five most frequently cited responses) 3711

    Types of drinks consumed in the last seven days by year group 4412

    Drinks consumed in the last seven days as a percentage of all drinks consumed by year group 4513

    Percentage of drinks consumed by day of the week by year group 4614

    Number of units consumed by year group 4715

    Extent of drunkenness by year group 5116

    Age when first drunk by year group 5117

    Intentionally getting drunk by year group 5218

    Intentionally getting drunk by current drinking level by year group 5219

  • 5List of figures and tables

    Location last time drunk compared to location last time drinking (top five presented) 5420

    Who students were with last time they were drunk compared to who they were with last 21 time drinking (top four listed) 55

    Tables

    Behaviours and different groups of interest 171

    Main domains and influences measured 192

    Drinking patterns and behaviours measured 193

    Achieved sample: profile by year group 214

    Demographic domain: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an 5 alcoholic drink is religion 26

    Demographic domain: Second most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having 6 had an alcoholic drink is ethnicity 27

    Individual domain: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an alcoholic 7 drink is Its ok to get drunk to see what its like 27

    Individual domain: Second most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an 8 alcoholic drink is Its ok to try drinking alcohol to see what its like 28

    Family domain: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an alcoholic 9 drink is seeing parents or carers drunk 28

    Family domain: Second most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an 10 alcoholic drink is seeing older siblings drunk 29

    Local context domain: The most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an 11 alcoholic drink is peer drinking 29

    Local context domain: Second most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an 12 alcoholic drink is ease of access 30

    Media and celebrity domain: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an 13 alcoholic drink is parental supervision of 18-rated films 30

    Media and celebrity domain: Second most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of 14 having had an alcoholic drink is time spent listening to music 31

    Reliability of recall about when last drinking 3315

    Differences in the location of last time drinking by when the drinking took place by year group 3616

  • 6 List of figures and tables

    Individual domain: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an alcoholic 17 drink in the previous week is the students perceived level of drinking compared to their peers 38

    Individual domain: Second most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an 18 alcoholic drink in the previous week is Its ok to get drunk once a week 39

    Family domain: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an alcoholic 19 drink in the previous week is parents knowing where their child is on a Saturday evening 39

    Family domain: Second most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an 20 alcoholic drink in the previous week is seeing an older sibling drunk 40

    Local context domain: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an 21 alcoholic drink in the previous week is the proportion of friends who drink 40

    Local context domain: Second most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having 22 had an alcoholic drink in the previous week is the perceived ease of obtaining alcohol 41

    Media and celebrity domain: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an 23 alcoholic drink in the previous week is parental supervision of 18-rated films 41

    Drinking patterns: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an alcoholic 24 drink in the previous week is related to being drunk 42

    Drinking patterns: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having had an alcoholic 25 drink in the previous week is the approximate number of drinks last consumed 42

    Individual domain: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having consumed higher 26 volumes in the previous week is the students perceived level of drinking compared to peers 48

    Individual domain: Second most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having consumed 27 higher volumes in the previous week is Its ok to get drunk once a week 48

    Family domain: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having consumed higher 28 volumes in the previous week is the number of evenings they are permitted to spend with friends 49

    Family domain: Second most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having consumed 29 higher volumes in the previous week is parents knowing where their child is on a Saturday night 49

    Individual domain: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having been drunk on 30 more than one occasion is having seen their parent(s) drunk 56

    Individual domain: Second most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having been 31 drunk on more than one occasion is parents knowing where children are on a Saturday evening 56

    Individual domain: Most significant bivariate relationship on likelihood of having been drunk 32 more than once is the students perceived drinking compared to their peers 57

    Influence of friends (1) 6533

  • 7List of figures and tables

    Influence of family members 6634

    Influence of perceived drinking norms 7035

    Influence of friends (2) 7036

    Influence of family drinking 7137

    Influence of friends (3) 7338

    Frequency of drinking 7639

  • 8 Executive summary

    Executive summary

    Background and objectives

    The Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) commissioned Ipsos MORI to carry out a study involving a survey of over 5,700 young people in school years 9 and 11 (with an age range of 1315 years). The study gathered robust information on the students levels and patterns of drinking and detailed information on the wide range of influences on drinking. Where this study differs from other research is that it develops evidence of how different domains of influence work together, understanding their relative importance in tackling different patterns of drinking among different groups. The different domains are demographic characteristics, individual factors, family, local context, and media and celebrity. The groups of interest to the research are:

    Model 1: Those who have consumed alcohol versus those who have not this will provide greater understanding of the relative importance of influences on young people drinking alcohol.

    Model 2: Those who have consumed alcohol in the previous week versus those who have consumed alcohol but not in the previous week this will provide greater understanding of the relative importance of inf

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