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Scottish Food and Drink DINU CATALIN IONUT DOBRIN IONUT BADEA CLAUDIU ANDREI GRUPA 8201

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Scottish Food and DrinkDINU CATALIN IONUTDOBRIN IONUTBADEA CLAUDIU ANDREIGRUPA 8201

Scottish producers now grow 3,000 tonnes of raspberries and22,000 tonnes of strawberries each year. Scotland is the birthplace of some of the main beef breeds in the world - including Aberdeen Angus, Galloway and Highland. We now produce nearly 30% of the UK's breeding cattle.Produces

SeafoodScotlands coastline is home to thousands of species of fish and shellfish. Scotland is now one of the largest seafood producers in Europe, and the third largest producer of farmed Atlantic salmon in the world, exporting to over 60 countries worldwide. Scottish lobsters are currently used in over 20 Michelin starred restaurants in Tokyo alone.

There are more than two dozen cheese-makers across Scotland, ranging from large Cheddar creameries to smaller artisan and farmhouse cheese-makers. Scottish Cheddar accounts for 80% of total output and the main creameries are located at Lockerbie, Stranraer and Campbeltown and on the islands of Bute, Arran, Islay, Mull and Orkney.Dairy

It's beyond dispute that whisky is one of Scotland's most famous exports. Sold in around 200 markets worldwide, whisky accounts for 80% of Scotland's food and drink export market.Our range of whiskies from 109 distilleries across Scotland is beyond compare.Whisky

Scotland is famous for naturally healthy oat-based products such as porridge and oatcakes - the latter being first produced as far back as the 14th century when Scottish soldiers would carry a sack of oatmeal which they would moisten and heat on a metal plate over a fire when they were hungry. Today, they are commonly enjoyed as an accompaniment to soups, or after dinner with cheese and chutney.Oatcakes

Scotland's national dish, haggis, is a savoury pudding containing sheeps heart, liver and lungs, minced with onion, oatmeal, spices and salt. Traditionally encased in the sheeps stomach, although nowadays most haggis is prepared in a sausage casing. It is traditionally served with neeps and tatties (turnip and potato), particularly when served as part of a Burns Supper. However, haggis is also enjoyed all year round with other traditional accompaniments such as black pudding.Haggis

Bibliographyhttp://www.scotland.org/experience-scotland/scottish-food-and-drink/http://www.visitscotland.com/about/food-drink/produce/