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Reading & Mathematics English Grades 18/Spanish Grades 15 Writing Grades 4 & 7 Science Grades 5 & 8 Proven to predict STAAR performance. Guaranteed to improve it.CurriculumAssociates.com/STAARprep This is the best I have seen in years. It is user friendly and right on target.Teresa N.Math ALT, Riverwood Middle SchoolI have 30 years of teaching experience and I know a good product when I see one. Rosalinda O.Third Grade Teacher, El Paso, TexasFrom: Vincent C., Piney Point ES, Houston ISDTo: STAAR ReadySubject: Thanks!Excellent materials bolstered student learning.STAAR is a federally registered trademark owned by the Texas Education Agency, and is used pursuant to license.In a recent independent study, STAAR Ready accurately predicted student performance on the STAAR test AND increased the number of students who scored 50% or higher by 46% in just 12 weeks. Look inside to see how it can work for you.2 Buy now at CurriculumAssociates.com/STAARprep, call 800-225-0248, or fax order to 800-366-1158What to look for when choosing your STAAR test practice and instruction:Give your students a program proven to prepare them for the STAARSTAAR Ready OtherDoes it include the latest updates that match the current TEA blueprints?Does it provide solid instructional support for test preparation materials?Are the TEKS standards clearly identified for each instructional lesson?Is it more difficult to differentiate between the choices in the STAAR multiple-choice answers?Does it provide rigorous multi-step practice problems to prepare students for the test?Has each book been completely revised (and not just blackline masters)?Is the recommended instruction driven from the data provided by the practice tests?Do the assessment results provide a clear indication of how your students would perform if they took the STAAR today?12345678STAAR is a federally registered trademark owned by the Texas Education Agency, and is used pursuant to license.STAAR Ready Test PracticeSTAAR Ready InstructionSTAAR Ready Test Practice + InstructionPretest, Benchmark, Post Test Give students authentic test-taking practice to build confidencepractice tests mirror content of the STAAR.Data-Driven Instruction Provide targeted, scaffolded instruction. Easy-to-use Teacher Guide gives you the support you need to teach each lesson most effectively.Save when you buy them together!3Give your students a program proven to prepare them for the STAAR1 2 3 4 5 6 7 81 2 3 4 5 6 7 8Student Books: 1020 copies: $11.99 21+ copies: $9.99Teacher Guides: $17.99ReadingEnglishSpanishMathematicsEnglishSpanishStudent Books: 1020 copies: $5.99 (Science: $2.99) 21+ copies: $4.99 (Science: $1.99)Teacher Guides: $5.99 (Science: $2.99)ReadingEnglishSpanishMathematicsEnglishSpanishWriting EnglishScience EnglishIt Works!In a recent independent study conducted by the Educational Research Institute of America, STAAR Ready accurately predicted student performance on the STAAR test AND increased the number of students who scored 50% or higher by 46% in just 12 weeks. 46%Read the entire study at CurriculumAssociates.com/STAARprep1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8Student Book Sets: 1020 sets: $15.99 (SAVE $2) 21+ sets: $11.99 (SAVE $3)Teacher Guides:* $17.99 * To order Teacher Guides, use STAAR Ready Instruction order numbers. (The Instruction Teacher Guide contains answers for both Test Practice and Instruction Student Books. There is no need to purchase the Test Practice Teacher Guide separately.)To order Teacher Guides, use .9 instead of .1 on Student Book #. Example: STRR .9To order Teacher Guides, use .9 instead of .1 on Student Book #. Example: STRR .9STRR13262.1 STRR13263.1 STRR13264.1 STRR13265.1 STRR13266.1 STRR13267.1 STRR13268.1 STRR13269.1STRR13270.1 STRR13271.1 STRR13272.1 STRR13273.1 STRR13274.1 STRR13315.1 STRR13316.1 STRR13317.1 STRR13318.1 STRR13319.1 STRR13320.1 STRR13321.1 STRR13322.1STRR13323.1 STRR13324.1 STRR13325.1 STRR13326.1 STRR13327.1 STRR14463.0 STRR14464.0 STRR13482.1 STRR13483.1STRR13249.1 STRR13250.1 STRR13251.1 STRR13252.1 STRR13253.1 STRR13254.1 STRR13255.1 STRR13256.1STRR13257.1 STRR13258.1 STRR13259.1 STRR13260.1 STRR13261.1 STRR13302.1 STRR13303.1 STRR13304.1 STRR13305.1 STRR13306.1 STRR13307.1 STRR13308.1 STRR13309.1STRR13310.1 STRR13311.1 STRR13312.1 STRR13313.1 STRR13314.1 ReadingEnglish STRR13817 STRR13818 STRR13819 STRR13820 STRR13821 STRR13822 STRR13823 STRR13824Spanish STRR13825 STRR13826 STRR13827 STRR13828 STRR13829 MathematicsEnglish STRR13830 STRR13831 STRR13832 STRR13833 STRR13834 STRR13835 STRR13836 STRR13837Spanish STRR13838 STRR13839 STRR13840 STRR13841 STRR13842 4 Buy now at CurriculumAssociates.com/STAARprep, call 800-225-0248, or fax order to 800-366-1158Test PracticePractice items ensure students are able to demonstrate not only procedural understanding but also conceptual understanding, as assessed on the new STAAR.The STAAR test will have an increased number of griddable responses.Mirror the content, rigor, and format of the test with STAAR Ready Test PracticeGrades 15 also available in Spanish!Three tests provide additional practicepretest, benchmark, post test44Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.GO ONPractice Test 223 Jenny got 98 points on her first math test and 90 points on her second math test. She wants to know how many more points she got on her first math test than her second. Jenny says she got 8 more points on her first math test. Is she correct and why?A Jenny is correct because how many more means subtraction, and 98 2 90 5 8.B Jenny is correct because how many more means addition, and 98 1 90 5 8.C Jenny is not correct because how many more means subtraction, and 98 2 90 5 18.D Jenny is not correct because how many more means addition, and 98 1 90 5 188.24 Patrick bought several sets of new mugs for his coffee shop. If Patrick counts the mugs in groups of 8, which list shows only numbers he will say?F 8, 12, 16, 20G 16, 24, 32, 40H 8, 15, 22, 29J 16, 26, 36, 46STAAR Ready Test Practice, Mathematics, Grade 3STAAR Ready Test Practice, Mathematics, Grade 7STAAR Ready Test Practice, Reading, Grade 769Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.GO ONPractice Test 345 Newton folded the net below along the dashed lines.Which of the following describes the shape of the folded object?A Triangular pyramidB Rectangular pyramidC Triangular prismD Rectangular prism46 Dave bought 18 golf balls priced at 3 for $8.95 and 250 tees priced at 50 for $6.50. What is the total cost, in dollars and cents, of the golf balls and tees?Record your answer and fill in the bubbles on your answer document. Be sure to use the correct place value.Practice Test 15Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.Read this selection. Then answer the questions that follow it.Sifs Golden Hair 1 Loki,wholivedinAsgardwiththeAesirgodsandgoddesses,lovedtocausetrouble.Nimbleandbright,likeaflickeringflame,Lokicouldchangehimselfintoanyform,whichmadehimamasterofdisguise.ThecunningLokilovedplayingtricksontheAesirgodsandgoddesses.ButfortunatelyfortheAesir,Lokistricksoftencamebacktohimwithnegativeconsequences.SomeofLokismeantricksevenendedupbenefitingthegodsinthelongrun.Forexample,neitherOdinnorThorwouldhavereceivedmagicalgiftsifnotforthedreadfultrickthatLokiplayedonThorswife,Sif. 2 AlloftheAesirgoddesseswerelovely,butnoneofthemhadhairasbeautifulandgoldenasSifs.Thor,thegodofthunder,adoredhisgolden-hairedwife.Herhairgleamedlikeafieldofripebarleyripplingunderflashesoflightning. 3 Onemorning,ThorawokeandsawtohishorrorthatallofSifsgoldenhairhadbeencroppedshort.Duringthenight,someonehadsnuckintotheirbedroomandchoppedoffSifsgoldentresses.SparksflewfromThorsredbeardasheroared,WhereisLoki?Onlyhecouldhavedonethishorribledeed!ThorrushedfromthehouseandstormedafterLoki,threateningtocrusheveryboneinhisbody. 4 Pleasesparemylife!criedLoki.IpromiseIwillhavethegnomesforgenewhairforSifhairmadeofrealgold! 5 ThorreleasedLoki,whoquicklyscamperedoffandrushedtotheunderworldwherethesonsofthegnomeIvaldilived.Ivaldissonswerefamousfortheirfineworkforgingmetal.Butbecausetheyweregnomestheywereorneryandhatedtodofavorsforanyone.SoLokiflatteredthem,sweeteningtheirillhumorwithpraise.SoontheypromisedtodowhatLokiaskedofthem. 6 LokiknewhewouldhavetoimpressthemightyAesirwithastonishinggiftstobeforgivenforcuttingSifshair.Lokisaidtothegnomes,UseyourforgingskillsandmagicpowerstomaketheAesirmarvel.ForgetressesofgoldenhairthatwillgrowonSifsheadlikerealhair.Thenmakeasharpspearthatwillalwaysstrikeitsmark.Finally,forgeavesselthatcansailonlandandsea. 7 Thegnomeswenttowork.Asthefireintheforgehissedandcrackled,thegnomesdrewmagiccirclesintheair.Thesecretivelittlegnomeshuddledtogether,castingspellsandmumblingincantations.Pitchblackandsulfuriccloudsofsmokerosefromtheforge.ThegnomesextractedadazzlinglumpofmoltengoldfromthefireandusedittospinthefinesttressesforSif.Then,theyforgedamagicspearandaflyingship.Armedwiththesespectaculargifts,LokilefttheunderworldandhurriedlyreturnedtoAsgard.Practice Test 17Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted. 8 What element from the story helps the reader know that this is a myth?F The setting of the story is unrealistic.G The story takes place in an ancient time.H The characters are gods and goddesses.J The plot contains a conflict and resolution. 9 What action taken by Loki sets the sequence of events in the plot in motion? A Loki wisely convinces Thor to spare his life.B Loki has the gnomes make gifts for Thor and Odin.C Loki learns how to draw magic circles in the air.D Loki cuts off all of Sifs beautiful, golden hair. 10 Read this sentence from paragraph 2 of the myth.Her hair gleamed like a field of ripe barley rippling under flashes of lightning. The author uses this simile to express F the difference between Sifs hair and a field of barleyG the beauty and brightness of Sifs hairH how a flash of lightning made Sifs hair gleamJ how much Thor adored his wifes golden hair11 In paragraph 3, the author states that sparks flew from Thors red beard to help the reader understand that A Thors beard is on fireB Thor feels very warmC Thor has been shamedD Thor is furiousPractice items require students to combine literary tools and apply higher-order thinking skills.Practice Test 16Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.GO ON 7 The graph below shows the number of books four students read for a reading contest.Books Read by StudentsNumber of BooksAltheaBarryCalvinDenise0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18Student NameHow many more books did Denise read than Althea?A 28B 3C 6D 17 8 A candy store gives away 4 lollipops to each person who enters the store between 10:00 a.m. and noon. At 10:00 a.m., the store has 350 lollipops. By noon, the store has 154 lollipops. How many customers entered the store between 10:00 a.m. and noon?F 49G 51H 98J 196Multi-step math problems prepare students for rigor of the new test.STAAR Ready Test Practice, Mathematics, Grade 45STAAR Ready Instruction, Reading, Grade 5Data-Driven Instruction57Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.IntroductionSTAAR TEKSTEKS 5.1.19.FL8: Making Connections Across GenresIn this lesson, you will learn about similarities and differences in texts of different genres. You will see how two selections can be alike or different.Many authors write about the same things. But their selections might be very different. Authors may write about the same topic, or subject. But they often have different reasons for writing. Suppose an author writes a letter to the editor about why palm trees should be planted. Another author writes a poem about palm trees in a hurricane. Both write about palm trees. But they have big differences. One argues that palm trees will make an area look nicer. The other describes the way palms sway in the wind.In stories, characters may be similar and different. For example, Kay and Kim attend the same school. But after school, Kay surfs in the ocean. Kim writes blog posts. Events may take place in the same settingor in different settings, such as a beach and a library. Stories can have similar themes, or messages. They can have different themes, too.In addition, two selections either can have the same main ideas or different main ideas. They can be organized similarly or differently. One book might cover a large range, such as basic facts about many insects. Another book might have a smaller focus, such as detailed facts about a few insects. Figuring out how selections are similar and different can help you better understand these selections. Use this diagram as a guide.Differences Similarities Differences5.1.19.F Make connections (e.g., thematic links, author analysis) between and across multiple texts of various genres and provide textual evidence.Lesson 8 Making Connections Across Genres58Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.Modeled InstructionL8: Making Connections Across GenresTEKS 5.1.19.FRead the selections. Look for details to answer the question below.My Doodlebug Hobby Finding doodlebugs is one of my favorite hobbies. Some people like to call them roly-polies or pill bugs, but I call them doodlebugs. I love watching them curl up into tiny balls to protect themselves. Did you know that doodlebugs have seven pairs of legs? They arent insects. We really shouldnt call them bugs at all!The Giant Pill Bug Sometimes called the giant pill bug, the giant isopod is from the same class of animals as shrimp and crabs. It has the same segmented body and hard outer shell as the tiny pill bug. However, the giant isopod can grow over 16 inches long. Its size helps it survive the strong ocean pressure.How are the two selections different? Think about the purpose of each selection. My Doodlebug Hobby is a personal narrative. The Giant Pill Bug is a science article. Think about how the ideas in each selection are presented. In My Doodlebug Hobby, the author gives an opinion about liking doodlebugs. In The Giant Pill Bug, the author simply presents facts about the giant isopod.ANSWER: These two selections are different in purpose and how they present material.Reread the selections to answer this question.Try I t !What is similar about the two passages?259Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.Guided InstructionCORRECT ANSWERSUPPORTING DETAILSINCORRECT ANSWERSTEKS 5.1.19.FL8: Making Connections Across GenresAnswer choice B is correct.In the first story, the hungry man gets one fish to eat for one day. In the second story, the hungry man learns to fish and eats for a lifetime. These are two different messages.A is not correct because both stories are set along the shore.C is not correct because both stories have the same purpose. The author wants to entertain readers with a story about what happens to a hungry man.D is not correct because both stories have a hungry man and a fisherman as characters.Read the stories. Use the Think About It to guide your reading. Then answer the question. Use the Hint to help you.The Generous Fisherman A hungry man was walking along the shore when he met a fisherman who gave him a fresh trout. The man was grateful because he knew he would eat that day.The Clever Fisherman A hungry man was walking along the shore when he met a fisherman who taught him to cast a line. The man was grateful because he knew he would eat for a lifetime.How are these two stories different?A They have different settings.B They have different messages.C They have different purposes.D They have different characters.Think About ItHow are the outcomes of the two selections different? Why are they different?HintWhat are the themes of the two selections?31Grades 15 also available in Spanish!Provide explicit instruction with STAAR Ready InstructionFive-step, scaffolded approach supports students: 12345IntroductionModeled InstructionGuided InstructionGuided PracticeIndependent Practice60Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.Guided PracticeL8: Making Connections Across GenresTEKS 5.1.19.FRead the selections. Use each Think About It to guide your reading.Greetings From Camp Tall Pines! Hi Mom and Dad! Im having a fantastic time at camp! Learning to canoe has been the biggest challenge. At first I was anxious, but my counselor has been patient. I enjoy hiking, too. Its so relaxing. Yesterday I saw a fox and a deer. My bunkmates are an entertaining bunch. We are rehearsing each night for the big Parents Day performance. My new friend Sharon and I are designing the costumes. Well, Id better go because the dinner bell just rang. Tonight is my favoritemeatloaf and macaroni and cheese! See you soon, SusanDiscover Camp Tall Pines! Spend the summer relaxing in the stunning wilderness! Miles from the bustling city, Camp Tall Pines offers towering pines, peaceful lakes, and fresh air. Daily activities teach kids everything they need to know about the great outdoors.Camp Features 12 cabins housing 6 campers each mess hall serving three meals per day 24 canoes for instruction and pleasure first-aid station with 24-hour on-call nurse outdoor theater for camp performancesAdventures and Activities instruction in swimming, canoeing, and archery two overnight camping trips supervised by counselors daily hikes and wildlife scouting on our beautiful trails daily arts and crafts and music appreciationWhat is the purpose of this brochure? How can you tell?What is the main idea presented in the brochure?How would you describe the authors attitude toward the camp?What is the main idea of the letter?What is the authors purpose in this letter?Think About It62Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.STAAR PracticeSTAAR PracticeL8: Making Connections Across GenresTEKS 5.1.19.FRead the next two selections. Then answer the questions that follow them.March 31, 3022: Troy 1 11:22 a.m. My family and I were only two light years away from the Crystal Galaxy when a sensor on our spaceship went out. We are making an emergency landing on a large asteroid called Troy, but were worried well encounter Dreckweevils. 2 12:20 p.m. We landed on Troy, which is cool for an asteroid. The ground shimmers with an odd bluish color, and everywhere there are pools of red liquid. While Mom and Dad work on the spaceship, Priscilla and I are exploring the asteroid on our Hoverblades. 3 1:23 p.m. You wont believe what happened! Priscilla and I had quietly coasted into the mouth of a cave. After a few moments, we heard a strange sucking sound. Quickly, we cruised back toward the spaceship. But we were being followed! 4 When we reached the spaceship, I spotted Dad on the Hoverledge and Mom handing tools up to him. Once we reached them, I looked back and could see the creature that had been following us. Its eight arms swayed. Attached to the suction cups on its arms were various tools, gadgets, and scraps of metal. 5 He sucks on anything made of metal, said Mom. Our tools must seem like candy to him. She pointed to the tools floating around our spaceship. 6 He can have them, said Dad, if I can have his socket probe. Dad moved toward his largest wrench and gave it a push through the air. The Dreckweevil suddenly sucked it to its body. Then the creature blinked its eyes, cocked its head, and slowly extended its arm toward Priscilla. Gently, she peeled free the socket probe.54Table of ContentsTo the Student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vLesson 1 Roots, Affixes, and Word Origins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1Lesson 2 Context Clues and Word Meanings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9Lesson 3 Summarizing and Paraphrasing Literary Texts . . . . 17Lesson 4 Inferences in Literary Texts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25Lesson 5 Theme and Genre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33Lesson 6 Plot, Characters, and Point of View . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41Lesson 7 Literary Elements and Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49Lesson 8 Making Connections Across Genres . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57Lesson 9 Summarizing Main Ideas and Details in Informational Texts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65Lesson 10 Organizational Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73Lesson 11 Inferences in Informational Texts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81TEKS STANDARD5 .1 .2 .A Readiness5 .1 .2 .B Readiness 5 .1 .2 .E Readiness5 .2 .19 .E Readiness/Supporting5 .2 .5 Supporting 5 .2 .14 .C Supporting 5 .2 .19 .D Readiness/Supporting5 .1 .3 .A Supporting 5 .2 .3 .B Supporting 5 .2 .3 .C Supporting5 .2 .6 .A Readiness 5 .2 .6 .B Readiness 5 .2 .6 .C Supporting5 .2 .4 .A Supporting 5 .2 .7 .A Supporting 5 .2 .8 .A Readiness5 .1 .19 .F Readiness5 .3 .11 .A Readiness 5 .3 .19 .E Readiness/Supporting5 .3 .11 .C Readiness 5 .3 .13 .A Supporting5 .3 .10 .A Supporting 5 .3 .19 .D Readiness/SupportingUse lessons year-round to teach all of the TEKS at every grade.STAAR is a federally registered trademark owned by the Texas Education Agency, and is used pursuant to license.6 Buy now at CurriculumAssociates.com/STAARprep, call 800-225-0248, or fax order to 800-366-1158Table of ContentsSTAAR Ready Program Overview A5STAAR Ready Instruction and Test PracticeWays to Use STAAR Ready Books A6Getting Started with STAAR Ready Books A7Testing with STAAR Ready Test Practice A8Teaching with STAAR Ready Instruction A10STAAR i-Ready Going Online with STAAR i-Ready A12Ways to Use STAAR i-Ready and Ready Books A14Getting Started with STAAR i-Ready and Ready Books A15Features of STAAR Ready Instruction A16Supporting Research A26Correlation Charts Correlations to the STAAR-Assessed TEKS in Reading A29 STAAR Ready Test Practice Questions by TEKS Standards A32STAAR Ready Test Practice Scoring Guide A38Lesson Plans (with Answers)Lesson 1 Roots, Affixes, and Word Origins 1Lesson 2 Context Clues and Word Meanings 8Lesson 3 Summarizing and Paraphrasing Literary Texts 15Lesson 4 Inferences in Literary Texts 22Lesson 5 Theme and Genre 29TEKS STANDARD5.1.2.A Readiness5.1.2.B Readiness 5.1.2.E Readiness5.2.19.E Readiness/Supporting5.2.5 Supporting 5.2.14.C Supporting 5.2.19.D Readiness/Supporting5.1.3.A Supporting 5.2.3.B Supporting 5.2.3.C SupportingA6The STAAR Ready Instruction and Test Practice books prepare students for the Reading STAAR. The instruction lessons and practice tests directly align to the STAAR-assessed TEKS. Three ways to use STAAR Ready Instruction and Test Practice together are described below. To learn how the STAAR Ready books and the STAAR i-Ready online system are integrated, see pages A12A15.Year-Long Supplemental (whole class)Lesson Sequence: Use STAAR Ready Instruction and Test Practice with the whole class to supplement any standards-based textbook program. Follow either the sequence of topics set in your textbook or the learning progression in the STAAR Ready Instruction table of contents.Pacing: STAAR Ready Instruction and Test Practice will take 18weeks to implement as a year-long supplement. The pacing chart gives suggested intervals. Allocate 3days to administer each practice test, 2days to score and review tests, and 5days to teach each lesson. See pages A10 and A11 for a Year-Long Supplemental Sample Week.Intensive Test Preparation (whole class or individual)Lesson Selection: Use STAAR Ready Instruction and Test Practice during an intensive preparatory phase before the state test. Administer Practice Test 1 of STAAR Ready Test Practice to identify the test questions students answered incorrectly. Next, consult the chart on page A32. Correlate those test questions to the related standards and the STAAR Ready Instruction lessons that focus on those standardsPacing: Allow at least 13 weeks for this test-prep period. See the Intensive Test-Preparation Sample Week on pagesA10 and A11 for a two-lessons-per-week plan.RTI: Response to Intervention (individual or small group)The assessment features of STAAR Ready Test Practice help you stay informed about student progress. As you become aware of skills students still struggle with, you can use specific STAAR Ready Instruction lessons to provide differentiated instruction. The scaffolded lessons support the challenged learnerinstructional support is removed gradually to build student independence. Extensive support in the teacher guide allows experienced teachers as well as paraprofessionals to successfully implement each lesson.Year-Long Pacing Chart for STAAR Ready, Grade 5Week STAAR Ready Instruction LessonMinutes per Day1STAAR Ready Practice Test 1 (pretest)30602L1: Roots, Affixes, and Word Origins30453L2: Context Clues and Word Meanings30454L3: Summarizing and Paraphrasing Literary Texts30455 L4: Inferences in Literary Texts 30456 L5: Theme and Genre 30457L6: Plot, Characters, and Point of View30458 L7: Literary Elements and Devices 30459STAAR Ready Practice Test 2 (benchmark)306010L8: Making Connections Across Genres304511L9: Summarizing Main Ideas and Details in Informational Texts304512 L10: Organizational Patterns 304513L11: Inferences in Informational Texts304514 L12: Text Features 304515 L13: Checking Facts 304516 L14: The Authors Position 304517L15: Making Connections Within and Across Informational Texts304518STAAR Ready Practice Test 3 (posttest)3060Ways to Use STAAR Ready BooksSTAAR Ready Instruction and Test PracticeSTAAR Ready Teacher Guide, Reading, Grade 5Teacher GuideGet extra support from the robust, easy-to-use Teacher GuideDelivers support on all content by Readiness or Supporting TEKS in an easy-to-use format.Includes correlation charts, pacing charts, and detailed lesson plans.Teachers get the support they need to teach each lesson most effectivelyall in an easy-to-use format.7STAAR is a federally registered trademark owned by the Texas Education Agency, and is used pursuant to license.51Modeled InstructionCurriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.TEKS 5.1.19.FL8: Making Connections Across GenresAt A GlAnceWith the class, read and discuss the selections and the question on page 58. Model the process used to answer the question as outlined in the bulleted points.SteP BY StePBefore ReadingTell students that they are about to read two selections. Encourage students to pay close attention to the connections between the ideas of each selection. Preview the question students will be asked to answer by telling them to think about what each author writes about and how.During ReadingHave students follow along as you read aloud the selections. Alternatively, have students read them silently. Remind students that they are looking for details about how the two selections are different.After ReadingRead the question that follows the selections. Model the process used to answer the question by discussing each of the bulleted points. Be sure to show students how to review the selections for details that help answer the question. Have students underline the supporting details as indicated in each point. Think about the purpose of each selection. My Doodlebug Hobby is a personal narrative. The Giant Pill Bug is a science article. (Have students underline the title and the first line of each selection.) Think about how the ideas in each selection are presented. In My Doodlebug Hobby, the author gives an opinion about liking doodlebugs. (Have students underline the third sentence in the selection.) In The Giant Pill Bug, the author simply presents facts about the giant isopod. (Have students underline phrases such as segmented body, hard outer shell, and over 16 inches long.) Make sure students understand how these details lead to the answer: These two selections are different in purpose and how they present material.try It!Direct students to answer the related try It! question. Read the question aloud with students to make sure they understand it. Have students, individually or in pairs, answer the question and write the answer on the lines provided. (Both selections describe a certain type of animal.)Then discuss their answers. Which selection would you use if you needed to write a report for school? (The Giant Pill Bug, because it contains more facts) Which selection would you use if you were giving a speech about unusual activities? (My Doodlebug Hobby, because it tells about an interest that not many people share.)58Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.Modeled InstructionL8: Making Connections Across GenresTEKS 5.1.19.FRead the selections. Look for details to answer the question below.My Doodlebug Hobby Finding doodlebugs is one of my favorite hobbies. Some people like to call them roly-polies or pill bugs, but I call them doodlebugs. I love watching them curl up into tiny balls to protect themselves. Did you know that doodlebugs have seven pairs of legs? They arent insects. We really shouldnt call them bugs at all!the Giant Pill Bug Sometimes called the giant pill bug, the giant isopod is from the same class of animals as shrimp and crabs. It has the same segmented body and hard outer shell as the tiny pill bug. However, the giant isopod can grow over 16 inches long. Its size helps it survive the strong ocean pressure.How are the two selections different? Think about the purpose of each selection. My Doodlebug Hobby is a personal narrative. The Giant Pill Bug is a science article. Think about how the ideas in each selection are presented. In My Doodlebug Hobby, the author gives an opinion about liking doodlebugs. In The Giant Pill Bug, the author simply presents facts about the giant isopod.ANSWER: These two selections are different in purpose and how they present material.Reread the selections to answer this question.TryI t !What is similar about the two passages?Both selections describe a certain type of animal.TEKS50Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.L8: Making Connections Across GenresTEKS 5.1.19.F5.1.19.F Readiness Standard Make connections (e.g., thematic links, author analysis) between and across multiple texts of various genres and provide textual evidence.Lesson 8 Making Connections Across Genres(Student Book pages 5764)TAP STUDENTS PRIOR KNOWLEDGETell students that they will be working on a lesson about making connections across genres. First, remind students that a genre is a type of writing. Two of the most common genres are fiction and nonfiction.Then have students think about two selections they have read before that are about the same subject. A good example might be a short story and article about the same kind of animal. How are the two selections alike? (The writers wrote about the same animal.) How are the selections different? (The story is meant to entertain, and the article is meant to inform.)For each selection, encourage students to identify the authors reason for writing and, if possible, his or her attitude toward the subject. Point out similarities and differences. Guide students to understand that many authors write about the same topic, but their selections might be very different.IntroductionAT A GLANcERead and discuss the Introduction on page 57.STEP BY STEPIdentify two fiction or nonfiction selections students have read. Assist students in making connections by discussing these elements: characterHow are story characters alike? How are they different? Tell students to consider characters actions, personalities, and appearances. SettingInvite volunteers to tell the time and place of two selections. How are the settings alike or different?TopicWhat are the selections about? Have students identify topics the authors write about. In what way are the topics similar or different?Authors PurposeDo the authors inform? explain? persuade? entertain? Have volunteers identify the authors reason for writing each selection. Authors PerspectiveWhat viewpoint does the author convey? What is his or her attitude toward the subject? Explain that perspective is how an author feels about a topic.Main IdeaWhat is the main idea? Remind students that the main idea is the most important idea expressed in a selection. Ask them to tell how the main idea in two selections is similar or different. ThemeRemind students that a story has a theme, or message. Have volunteers compare and contrast the themes of two different stories.ScopeHow much information does each selection cover? Tell students that a scope is the range of information in a selection. Explain that a book about elephants would have a narrower scope than a book about animals in Africa. If possible, use samples from magazines or textbooks to explain the concept of scope. 57Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.IntroductionTEKSTEKS 5.1.19.FL8: Making Connections Across GenresIn this lesson, you will learn about similarities and differences in texts of different genres. You will see how two selections can be alike or different.Many authors write about the same things. But their selections might be very different. Authors may write about the same topic, or subject. But they often have different reasons for writing. Suppose an author writes a letter to the editor about why palm trees should be planted. Another author writes a poem about palm trees in a hurricane. Both write about palm trees. But they have big differences. One argues that palm trees will make an area look nicer. The other describes the way palms sway in the wind.In stories, characters may be similar and different. For example, Kay and Kim attend the same school. But after school, Kay surfs in the ocean. Kim writes blog posts. Events may take place in the same settingor in different settings, such as a beach and a library. Stories can have similar themes, or messages. They can have different themes, too.In addition, two selections either can have the same main ideas or different main ideas. They can be organized similarly or differently. One book might cover a large range, such as basic facts about many insects. Another book might have a smaller focus, such as detailed facts about a few insects. Figuring out how selections are similar and different can help you better understand these selections. Use this diagram as a guide.Differences Similarities Differences5.1.19.F Readiness Standard Make connections (e.g., thematic links, author analysis) between and across multiple texts of various genres and provide textual evidence.Lesson 8 Making Connections Across GenresSTEP BY STEP section provides background material and scripting.53Guided PracticeCurriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.at a glanceHave each student read the selections on page 60. Then have them answer the three multiple-choice questions on page 61 and provide supporting details for the answers.Step by StepBefore ReadingPoint out the think about It questions next to the selections. Explain to students that these questions will help them better understand how ideas in the two selections can be connected.During ReadingHave students read the selections independently, using the think about It questions to guide their reading. After ReadingHave students answer the multiple-choice questions that follow the selections. Make sure students understand that they should provide details from the selections to support their answers.Point out the Hints. There is one for each question. Tellstudents that the hints provide clues about the organization, scope, and treatment of each selection. These clues will help students respond to the questions. Remind students to look back at the selections for supporting details.For the pair/Share activity, have students discuss their answers with a partner. Encourage students to share the details from the selections that they used to support their answers.Follow up with a whole-class discussion of answers and supporting details.ell SupportWrite the words brochure and letter, and explain their meanings. If possible, display samples of each kind of writing. If samples are not available, have students look at page 60 as you point out the text features of each kind of writing (e.g., headings and bullets on the brochure; greeting and closing on the letter). Ask students which type of writing they would use to try to sell something. (brochure) Which would they use to tell a friend about an event? (letter)60Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted.Guided PracticeL8: Making Connections Across GenresTEKS 5.1.19.FRead the selections. Use each Think About It to guide your reading.greetings From camp tall pines! Hi Mom and Dad! Im having a fantastic time at camp! Learning to canoe has been the biggest challenge. At first I was anxious, but my counselor has been patient. I enjoy hiking, too. Its so relaxing. Yesterday I saw a fox and a deer. My bunkmates are an entertaining bunch. We are rehearsing each night for the big Parents Day performance. My new friend Sharon and I are designing the costumes. Well, Id better go because the dinner bell just rang. Tonight is my favoritemeatloaf and macaroni and cheese! See you soon,SusanDiscover camp tall pines! Spend the summer relaxing in the stunning wilderness! Miles from the bustling city, Camp Tall Pines offers towering pines, peaceful lakes, and fresh air. Daily activities teach kids everything they need to know about the great outdoors.camp Features 12 cabins housing 6 campers each mess hall serving three meals per day 24 canoes for instruction and pleasure first-aid station with 24-hour on-call nurse outdoor theater for camp performancesadventures and activities instruction in swimming, canoeing, and archery two overnight camping trips supervised by counselors daily hikes and wildlife scouting on our beautiful trails daily arts and crafts and music appreciationWhat is the purpose of this brochure? How can you tell?What is the main idea presented in the brochure?How would you describe the authors attitude toward the camp?What is the main idea of the letter?What is the authors purpose in this letter?Think About ItTEKS 5.1.19.FL8: Making Connections Across GenresSpecial ELL support, mini lessons, and real-world examples extend the classroom learning opportunities.Student pages are shown for easy reference.7HoustonAustinDallasPRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID CURRICULUM ASSOCIATES LLC1/14 5.5KSTAAR is a federally registered trademark owned by the Texas Education Agency, and is used pursuant to license.Southeast and East TexasKaren Goins Office: 281-597-0653 Cell: 713-854-6166 KGoins@cainc.comContact your local rep today!North and West Texas, PanhandleKyle Warren817-723-7413 kyle@warrenin.comCentral Texas, Rio Grande Valley, and El Paso AreasGary Tipton512-919-4776 GTipton@cainc.comShawn Popovich512-422-4491 SPopovich@cainc.com

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