plautus 5 (loeb)

Download Plautus 5 (Loeb)

Post on 08-Nov-2014

177 views

Category:

Documents

42 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Plautus' Comedies Vol. 5, Latin & English

TRANSCRIPT

THE LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARYFOUNDED BY JAMES LOEB,EDITED BYfT. E. PAGE,t E.C.H., LTTT.D.

LL.D.

CAPPS,POST,

PH.D., LL.D.

t

W. H, D. ROUSE,

litt.d.

L. A.

M.A.

E. H.

WARMINGTON,

m.a., r.B.HisT.soc.

PLAUTUSV

P L A

U TUVOLUMES

S

WITH AN ENGLISH TRANSLATION BY

PAUL NIXONDKAK OF BOWDOIN OOLUKGK, XAIKS

IN FIVE

VSnCHUS THREE BOB DAY TRUCULENTUS THE TALE OF A TRAVELLING BAG FRAGMENTS

.#eLONDON

WILLIAM HEINEMANN LTDCAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS

HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESSMCMLII

First printed

193S

Reprinted 1952

Pfl

TPrinted in Great Britain

THE GREEK ORIGINALS AND DATES OF THE PLAYS IN THE FIFTH VOLUMEThe Stichus was adapted from Menander'sa secondA.D. 200.less 'A3eAoi was produced in 306Poliorcetes

whenwith

wintered

Athens

much pomp and

circumstance.

war, and to busybodiesreginae dixeritoriginal,this'

References in the Trinummus to Asian trade and knowing quid in aurem rexcause HueffnerT^cravpos,

to assign

its

Greek

Philemon's

to the period

when

same Demetrius Poliorcetes ruled in Athens, 292-287 B.C. The Trinummus itself seems to havebeen produced no earUer than 194^

b.c.

'

Stich. 402-405. Stich. 287. Hueffner, 46.

*

*

Trin. 207.

Stich. 490-491. Stich. 290-291. Trin. 598-599. Huefiner, 61.

THE GREEK ORIGINALSThe original of the Truculentus is unknown. Stratophanes' statement that he overthrew Syria,itogetheroriginal

with

Diniarchus''^

allusion

to

going

to

Lemnos cum297B.c.^

publico imperioin

make

it

likely that that

was pi'oduced

Athens between 299 andat

The

Truculentus was written toward thelife

end of Plautus'

and probably was presented

Rome

about 1861

b.c.

^ True. 91-92. True. 530-532. Hueffner, 33.

VI

SOME ANNOTATED EDITIONS OF PLAYS IN THE FIFTH VOLUMEStichus, Fennell;

Cambridge, Cambridge Univer;

sity Press, 1893.

Trinummus, Faircloughlan

New

York, The Macmil;

Company,

1909.

Trinummus, Freeman and Sloman

Oxford, Claren-

don Press, 1885.Trinummus, Morris;

Boston and London, Ginn andGottingen,

Company,

1898. Truculenius, Spengel;

Vandenhoeck

und Ruprecht, 1868.

m

CONTENTSI.

Stichus

poge

1

II.

Trinummus, or Three Bob DayTruculentus

97

III.

223

IV. Vidularia, orV. Fragments

The Tale of a

Travelling

Bag

333351

Index

367

IX

STICHVS

STICHUS

GRAECA ADELPHOE MENANDRU ACTA LUDIS PLEBEISCN.

BAEBIO C. TERENTIO AED. T. PUBLILIUS PELLIO

PL.

MARCIPOR OPPIITIBIISC.

SARRANIS TOTAMC.

SULPICIO

AURELIO

COS.

STICHUS

FROM THE GREEK PLAY OF MENANDER, THE BROTHERS. ACTED AT THE PLEBEIAN GAMES IN THE PLEBEIAN AEDILESHIP OF GNAEUS BAEBIUS AND GAIUS TERENTIUS. PRODUCED BY TITUS PUBLILIUS PELLIO. xVIUSIC, ON TYRIAN FLUTES THROUGHOUT,BY OPPIUS' MARCIPOR. GAIUS SULPICIUS AND GAIUS AURELIUS,CONSULS.

; ; ;

ARGVMENTVM

I

Duas sorores simul in matrimonium duo fratres ducunt. post re confracta duo rem quaerunt peregre, qui paupertatem levent.ibi

absunt peregrinantes per triennium.filias

sorores nolunt prodere absentes viros.

pater castigat propter earn rem

;

ne se conlocet. reveniunt opibus aucti ad uxores viri facete reduces ludunt. potant servuli.sedei

persuadent,

aliis

ARGVMENTVMSenexcastigatfilias,

IIviros

quod eae

Tam

perseverent peregrinantis pauperes

Ita sustinere fratres neque relinquere

Contraque verbis delenitur commodis,

Habere

ut sineret quos semel nactae forent.

Viri reveniunt opibus aucti trans

mare

Suam4

quisque retinet, ac Sticho ludus datur.

;

ARGUMENT OF THE PLAY

(I)

Two brothers marrj' two sisters at the same time. Later, having lost their money, the brothers go abroad to recoup these losses that have left them And abroad they stay for three long years. poor. The sisters ^\^ll not hear of gi^^ng up their absent husbands. This leads their father to upbraid them but they persuade him not to marry them to other Home come the husbands to their wives at m.en. last, affluent again; and a lively time the homecomers have. The slaves carouse.

ARGUMENT OF THE PLAY

(II)

An old gentleman upbraids his daughters for standing by their husbands through thick and thin and refusing to give them up, two impoverished brothers then abroad. The girls, however, find the proper words to appease him and are permitted to keep the mates they already have. Their husbands, affluent again, return from across the sea. They have their \\-ives secure, and Stichus is allowed to celebrate.

PERSONAEPANEGYRIS VXOR EPIGNOMI SOROR VXOR PAMPHILIPPi ANTIPHO SENEX GELASIMVS PARASITVS CROCOTIVM ANCILLA PINACIVM PVER EPIGNOMVS )PAMPHILIPPVS/^'^^'^^^^ STICHVS ISERVl SANGARINVS/ J' STEPHANIVM ANCILLA

DRAMATIS PERSONAEPaxegyris, wife of Epignomus. Sister of Panegyris, and rvife of Pampkilippus. Antipho, their father, an old gentleman of Athens. Gelasimus, a parasite.

Crocotium, maid to Panegyris. PiNACiuM, slave boy of Panegyris. Epignomus ., .., \ brothers, youns Athenians. Ti ' " PamphilippusJ Stichus, slave of Epignomus. Sangarixus, slave of Pamphilippus. Stkphanium, maid to Pamphilippus' ivife."\

,

.

ACTVSPan.

I

Credo ego miseram fuisse Penelopam,soror, suo ex animo,

quae tam diu viduaviro suo caruit

nam

nos eius

animumnoscimus, quarumviri

de nostris

factis

hinc apsunt,

Sor.

negotiis apsentum, ita ut aequom est, soUicitae noctes et dies, soror, sumus semper. Nostrum officium nos facere aequomist, neque id magis facimus

quorumque nos

quam nos monet pietas. sed hie, soror, asside dumloqui de reviri.

:

multa volo tecum10

Pan.Sor.

Salvene,

amabo ?

sed hoc, soror, crucior, patrem tuom meumque adeo, unice qui unus ^ civibus ex omnibus probus perhibetur, eum nunc improbi viri officio uti, viris qui tantas apsentibus nostris facit iniurias immerito nosque ab eis abducere volt.;

Spero quidem et volo

^

Corrupt (Leo).

Scene

:

Athens.

A

street in rchich

stand the houses

of Epignomus, Pamphilippus and Antipho.

ACT

I

ENTER Panegyris and her sister into doorway of Panegyris' house, they look down the street,disappointedly.

Ah, Penelope must have felt dreary, sister, living alone without her husband all that time. We know what her feelings ^vere, all right, from what's happened to us, with our husbands gone, and we for ever anxious about their affairs while they're away and so we should be, sister day and night. {resolutely) We should do our duty, and what we do is no more than our loyalty dictates, {droning her to a couch mthin the nide open doors) But do come and sit down here, dear. There's lots I want to talk over with you it's this husband matter.{querulously)

{as they seat themselves)I

Mercy

!

All's well, isn't

it ?

But here's what torments me, sister to have your father, yes, and mine, who's held to be the one outstanding man of high principles in this whole city, to have him, him, act like an unprincipled scoundrel now in doing our absent husbands such dreadful, undeserved injustice and wanting to take us awaycertainly hope so

and

vvish so.

TITUS MACCIUS PLAUTUShaec res vitae me, soror, saturant, haec mihi dividiae et senio sunt. Ne laeruma, soror, neu tuo id animo fac quod tibi tuos pater facere minaturspes est eum melius faeturum. novi ego ilium ioeulo istaec dicit,:

Pan.

20:

neque

ille sibi

mereat Persarum

montis, qui esse aurei perhibentur, ut istuc faciat quod tu metuis.

tamen

si

faciat,

minime

irasci

Sor.

Pan.

Sor.

decet, neque id immerito eveniet. nam viri nostri domo ut abierunt, hie tertius annus. Ita ut memoras, Quom ipsi interea vivant, valeant, ubi sint, quid agant, ecquid agant, neque participant nos, neque redeunt. An id doles, soror, quia illi suom officium non colunt, quom tu tuom facis ?Ita poi.

30

Pan.Sor.

Tace

Pan.Sor.

cave sis audiam ego istuc posthac ex te. Nam quid iam ? Quia pol meo animo omnis sapientissis,

suom officium aequom est colere et facere. quam ob rem ego te hoc, soror, tametsi es maior, moneo, ut tuom memineris officium:

40

improbi sint atque aliter nobis faciant quam aequomst, tam pol ne quid magi' sit,^ omnibus obnixe ooibus nostrum officium meminisse decet.etsiilli

*

magi^

sit

Lindsay,

sit

A

:

magis simus (Leo), lacuna noted.

10

STICHUSfrom them,(choking) It's this that

of life, dear. It's this that harassed, so worn.Pan.(petting her)

makes me tired makes me feel so!

Don't There, there, sister, don't cry treat your oift-n self the way your father threatens I'm in hopes he'll do better than to treat you. he's having hi