michigan curriculumframework

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  • 1. 60 Y = 10 * sin (x) + x 50 40 30 20 10 0 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 0 5 x MICHIGAN CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK Michigan Department of Education 12 11109
  • 2. MICHIGAN STATE BOARD OF EDUCATIONClark W. Durant, President .................................................................................................................... DetroitMarilyn F. Lundy,Vice President.............................................................................................................. DetroitDorothy Beardmore, Secretary ........................................................................................................RochesterBarbara Roberts Mason,Treasurer ....................................................................................................... LansingKathleen N. Straus, NASBE Delegate .................................................................................................. DetroitLouis E. Legg, III ............................................................................................................................. Battle CreekSharon A.Wise ...................................................................................................................................... OwossoGary L.Wolfram .................................................................................................................................... Hillsdale The opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the Michigan State Board of Education, and no official endorsement by the Michigan State Board of Education should be inferred. EX OFFICIO MEMBERS John M. Engler Governor Arthur E. Ellis Superintendent of Public Instruction Number of copies printed: 10,000 Costs per copy: $3.33 The publication of this document is authorized by section 1278 of the School Code of 1976, as revised. The development of this document has been supported by federal funding through the U.S. Department of Education under the Secretarys Fund for Innovation in Education and the Eisenhower National Program for Mathematics and Science Education. A publication of the Michigan Department of Education
  • 3. MichiganCurriculum Framework Michigan Department of Education Lansing, Michigan 1996Copyright 1996, by The State of Michigan. All Rights Reserved. Local and Intermediate School Districts areencouraged to create copies for their own educational purposes. No part of this publication may be reproduced,stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying,recording or otherwise for commercial purposes without the prior written permission of the Michigan State Boardof Education.
  • 4. Table of Contents Section I: IntroductionSection II: Michigan Content Standards and Draft Benchmarks Section III: Planning Section IV: Teaching and Learning Section V: Assessment Section VI: Professional Development Appendix A: Tier II Toolkits Appendix B: Tier III Resources Appendix C: Glossary Appendix D: Contributors
  • 5. Section I: Introduction
  • 6. INTRODUCTIONT he Michigan Curriculum Framework is a resource for helping Michigans public and private schools design, implement, and assess their core content area curricula.The content standards identified in this document arepresented as models for the development of local districtcurriculum by the Michigan State Board of Education and theMichigan Department of Education. They represent rigorousexpectations for student performance, and describe theknowledge and abilities needed to be successful in todayssociety. When content, instruction, and local and stateassessments are aligned, they become powerful forces thatcontribute to the success of student achievement. We believe that efforts to set clear, common, stateThe framework presents a content and a process for developing and/or community-basedcurriculum that enables schools to realize Michigans vision for academic standards forK-12 education: students in a given school district or state are Michigans K-12 education will ensure that all necessary to improve students will develop their potential in order to lead student performance. productive and satisfying lives. All students will Academic standards engage in challenging and purposeful learning that clearly define what blends their experiences with content knowledge students should know and and real-world applications in preparation for their be able to do at certain adult roles, which include becoming: points in their schooling to be considered proficient in literate individuals specific academic areas. We believe that states and healthy and fit people communities can benefit from working together to responsible family members tap into the nations best thinking on standards and productive workers assessments. involved citizens 1996 National Education Summit Policy Statement self-directed, lifelong learnersThe intent of this document is to provide useful resources todistricts as they strive to implement a program which ensuresthat all students reap the benefits of a quality education andachieve the adult roles described in Michigans vision forK-12 education. The content standards and benchmarks serveas worthy goals for all students as they develop the knowledgeand abilities inherent in their adult roles. They represent anessential component in the process of continuous schoolimprovement, which like professional development, should befocused on improving student achievement. S i I I d i i
  • 7. The framework emphasizes the importance of: using continuous school improvement to align all district initiatives for the purpose of increasing student achievement; building a curriculum based on rigorous content standards and benchmarks; using student achievement data to make decisions about continuous school improvement, curriculum, instruction, and professional development; and, incorporating research-supported teaching and

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